Jesse Powers Overstreet (1837-1924) - Find a... (2024)

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Photo added by Bryan S. Godfrey

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Birth

Bedford County, Virginia, USA

Death
8 Jan 1924 (aged 86)

Bedford County, Virginia, USA

Burial

Overstreet-Crowder-Foster Cemetery

Chestnut Fork, Bedford County, Virginia, USA Add to Map

Memorial ID
102445383 · View Source

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Ancestors of Jesse Powers Overstreet

Generation No. 1

1. Jesse Powers Overstreet, born 18 Dec 1838 in Bedford Co., VA or Montgomery Co., VA; died 08 Jan 1924 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 2. Littleberry Overstreet and 3. Mildred Witt. He married (1) Mary Jane Warner 24 Feb 1862 in Bedford Co., VA. She was born 08 Sep 1841 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA, and died 19 Sep 1922 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of Jacob Warner and Sarah Updike.

More About Jesse Powers Overstreet:
Date born 2: 18 Dec 1837
Burial: Overstreet-Crowder-Foster plot on Rt. 24 near Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA
Cause of Death: mitral regurgitation
Census 1: 09 Jul 1870, Otter Township, Bedford Co., VA. Value of personal estate $190. Neighbors were Sarah Warner (mother-in-law), Thomas and Elizabeth Updike Shepherd (wife's aunt), Reason and Susan Mayhew, Littleberry and Mildred Overstreet (parents), etc.
Census 2: 15 Aug 1860, Apparently had left his parents' household in Tazewell Co., VA and returned to Bedford by this time, as he was listed as J.P. Overstreet, age 23, as a farmhand in the household of Jno. H. Franklin, age 34, in Southern Revenue District of Bedford Co., VA
Comment: 1860, In the 1860 census of Southern Revenue District, Bedford Co., VA, he is listed in the household of Jno. H. Franklin, and one household down is listed that of Thomas A. Oversteeet, age 27, probably the son of Archibald Oversteet and Polly Crouch.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Baptist-member of Quaker Baptist Church, Bedford Co., VA
Event: 10 May 1904, Applied for a Confederate pension on account of disabilities caused by a hernia and chronic bronchitis. Dr. J.T. Rucker signed the application, and Jesse signed his own name.
Military 1: Civil War-Private-Company G, 28th Regiment, VA Infantry, Confederate States Army; enlisted 27 Apr 1861, discharged 30 Dec 1861 by medical board.
Military 2: According to his grandson, Theo Ernest Williamson (1914-2005 ) of Newport News, VA, Jesse was shot in the Civil War and the bullet is preserved by a descendant
Military 3: 22 Oct 1864, He is probably the J.P. Overstreet who enlisted at Liberty this date, a second tour of duty, for in an 1888 pension application, he stated he was wounded 30 Mar 1865 in the Battle of Hatchers Run outside Petersburg, VA, shot in his shoulder.
Occupation: Farmer
Residence 1: Bef. 1860, Raised in Montgomery Co. and Tazewell Co., VA where his parents lived prior to returning to Bedford. According to the death certificate of his son Zone, Jesse was born in Montgomery County, but Jesse's death certificate says he was born in Bedford County.
Residence 2: Aft. 1860, Present-day Rt. 24 1.5 miles W of Rt. 732, Bedford Co., VA

Notes for Mary Jane Warner:
The following is Mary's obituary from the "Bedford Bulletin-Democrat":

On September 19th, at noon, the death angel visited the home of Mr. Jesse P. Overstreet, near Chestnut Fork, and claimed for its victim the beloved wife and mother, Mary Jane Overstreet. She had been in declining health for several months, but was able to discharge the lighter household duties most of the time, but on Saturday morning, the 16th, at 4 o'clock, she suffered a stroke of paralysis, and from that time grew rapidly worse until the end came. Mrs. Overstreet was 81 years old and during her long life in this county and community earned the love and veneration of her neighbors and others with whom she came in contact. She is survived by her husband, one son, Mr. B.Z. Overstreet, and three daughters, Mrs. H.L. [Malissa] Foster, Mrs. R.E. [Fannie] Williamson, and Mrs. M.H. [Mildred] Crowder; also by one sister, Mrs. W.S. [Lee] Mayhew, and by thirty grandchildren and thirty great-grandchildren.
She was a member of Wilson Methodist Church, and was a devoted wife and mother and grandmother, and a kind and obliging neighbor. One of her greatest pleasures in life was to help the needy, and especially in cases of illness she was a welcome visitor, carrying as she always did and encouraging and cheerful word, some small gift, and the willingness to do what she could to relieve those in distress. She had a kind, loving disposition, and is greatly missed in her home and community.
She was laid to rest in the family cemetery near her home, the funeral being conducted by her pastor, Rev. J.D. Burford, in the presence of a large assembly of sorrowing friends and loved ones; her grave was covered with beautiful flowers, tributes from her multitude of friends. May God's richest blessing rest upon the aged and grief-stricken husband and children.
BERTA [Berta Lillie Mayhew, her niece]

More About Mary Jane Warner:
Burial: Overstreet-Crowder-Foster plot on Rt. 24 near Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA
Cause of Death: apoplexy
Comment: Her father was a Revolutionary soldier and her husband was a Civil War soldier! Her father was 79 years old when she was born.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Methodist-member of Wilson's United Methodist Church, Bedford Co., VA
Residence: Farm on south side of present Rt. 24 (across from cemetery) in Bedford Co., VA

Generation No. 2

2. Littleberry Overstreet, born Abt. 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; died Jul 1880 in Staunton River District, Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 4. Jesse Overstreet and 5. Elizabeth Gordon. He married 3. Mildred Witt 12 Dec 1836 in Bedford Co., VA.
3. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; died 18 Jul 1872 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 6. Rowland Witt and 7. Sarah Duvall.

Notes for Littleberry Overstreet:
From: [emailprotected]
Subject: Interesting observations about the Overstreet name dying out in the Littleberry Overstreet branch and why my Cousin Errin is unique in my family
Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2010 11:58:56 -0500

It's long been remarked in the immediate family of my great-grandfather, Herbert Colon Overstreet (1885-1967) , that my first cousin, Errin Michael Overstreet of near Atlanta, GA, age 34 and unmarried, is the only great-grandchild of Herbert and Bessie carrying the Overstreet name, even though my grandfather Ray had three brothers (and four sisters). Granddad's brother Cecil only had one daughter, his brother Bernard only had one son who has no children, and his brother Rudolph only had two daughters.

A couple of weeks ago, I discovered that my third cousin, Drew Overstreet of Kentucky, has a genealogy website, mainly for the Woodford side of his family because they have reunions every year. So I called him and told him I have lots of information on his dad's entire ancestry. Drew is a grandson of my grandfather's double first cousin, W. Earl Overstreet. He has two daughters and one son, who is the only great-great-grandson of my great-grandfather's brother, Leffie Overstreet, carrying the Overstreet name.

In spite of the fact that my great-grandfather's parents, Berry Zone Overstreet (1863-1934) and Lucy Cheek Overstreet (1861-1958) , had two daughters and seven sons, it appears my Cousin Errin and Drew's 12-year-old son Jonathan Daniel Overstreet are among the few carrying the Overstreet name among Zone and Lucy's descendants. Uncle Howard's only surviving son Melvin did not have children, Uncle Jim had no children, Uncle Luther died childless at age 18, and Uncle Delbert's only son Berry only has one daughter. As for Uncle Otey, his son Luther only had one daughter, his son Mahlon had two sons, his son Winston has two children but if I recall they are both adopted (correct me Dave if that is wrong and only one of them is adopted), and his son Woodie had two sons and three daughters. Woodie's son Dave has no children, and his son W.S. Jr. has six children, but only one son who died as an infant. Mahlon's son Wayne has a 34-year-old son named Travis Wayne Overstreet, Jr., and I don't know his situation. Mahlon's deceased son Keith had a son Eric who apparently changed his name after his parents' divorce.

So correct me if I am wrong (Dave, you'd be the best one to know about the Otey Overstreet branch), but it appears that my first cousin Errin Michael Overstreet, and my third cousins Michael Drewry Overstreet, Jr. and Travis Wayne Overstreet, Jr. are the only biological great-great-grandsons of B. Zone and Lucy Cheek Overstreet carrying the Overstreet name. And I currently have 91 great-great-grandchildren listed for them in my database, though this is probably much outdated since most of my information comes from the Updike book that was written 25 years ago (though most in my generation had been born by that time but another generation has been born since then). Moreover, because my great-great-grandfather Zone was the only son of his parents, Jesse Powers Overstreet (1838-1924) and Mary Jane Warner Overstreet (1841-1922), who had three daughters after they had him, this means that Errin, Drew, and Travis are the only great-great-great-grandchildren of Jesse and Mary carrying the Overstreet name (out of 150 in my database). Dave, does Travis go by Travis or by Wayne like his dad? Does he have children? [Yes, he has a son named Gavin

It appears that Jesse Powers Overstreet's parents, Littleberry Overstreet (1810?-1880) and Mildred Witt Overstreet (1812?-1872), had six children, but I have been unable to determine what became of those who lived to childbearing age and whether any besides Jesse had children. All but two, Jesse and Addison, were daughters however, and I have been unable to determine what became of Addison, who was about 22 years younger than his brother Jesse.

However, Littleberry's parents, Jesse Overstreet (died in Norfolk, VA in 1814 during the War of 1812) and Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet (1791-1889), who interestingly enough was still living when my great-grandfather Herbert, her great-great-grandson, was born, had at least three other sons besides Littleberry, and the male line has been prolific among them. And Jesse's parents, Thomas Overstreet, Jr. (1744-1842) and Barsheba Turner Overstreet (?-ca. 1825), had 14 children besides Jesse, most of whom were sons whose male lineages have been prolific. And the farthest back that we can prove our lineage is to Thomas, Jr's parents, Thomas Overstreet, Sr. (?-ca. 1791) and Agnes ? Overstreet, who came from Orange Co., VA to Bedford County about 1755 and who had two other sons besides Thomas, Jr.: William, who went to Tennessee, and John, who went to Illinois.

The Overstreets in Bedford County descend from either Thomas Overstreet, Sr., who settled on the south side of the county around 1755, or a James Overstreet, who came from Goochland Co., VA and settled in the north side in the 1700s also. We do not know how Thomas and James were related, but the YDNA of their descendants matches and proves they were related. More than likely they were first cousins once removed and both were probably descended from a James Overstreet who settled in King and Queen Co., VA by the 1680s and died after 1703. James was probably our immigrant ancestor, as shown by YDNA test results from several other Overstreets whose families originated there.

Even for those uninterested in genealogy, I hope this is a good summary of the Overstreet lineage and how interesting it is that a male line can become extinct easily even if people have lots of other descendants. ...

******************************************************
Comments by Bryan S. Godfrey:

Previously it has been assumed by several Overstreet researchers, including me, that Addison was a son and the youngest child of Littleberry Overstreet and Mildred Witt, simply because he appears in their household in census records. However, in the 1880 Bedford Co., VA Census, he is listed as a son, age 20, in the household of Bettie Overstreet, age 35. Her sister Martha was also listed in her household. Because both were listed in the Littleberry Overstreet household in previous census records, it would appear that Elizabeth AKA Bettie was a daughter of Littleberry and Mildred, and that Addison was her son and their grandson, probably an illegitimate son. In the 1880 census, Bettie is listed as a widow, which may have been a falsehood fabricated to hide the shame of being an unwed mother in those days. Because Mildred would have been about 48-50 years old when Addison was born, that also gives credence to him being her grandson rather than her son. It is not known what became of him or his mother Bettie after the 1880 Census.

Therefore, it appears that my great-great-great-grandfather, Jesse Powers Overstreet, was the only son of Littleberry Overstreet and Mildred Witt.

James and Mildred Overstreet and his daughter Missouri were listed next to Bettie's household in the 1880 Census. James was her uncle, a brother of Littleberry Overstreet. Bettie's brother Jesse and his wife Mary Overstreet, and their children Zone, Mildred, Fannie, and Lissie, were listed two more households up from them but on the preceding page. Six households down the page was listed William Updike and his son Nathan (William being the father of Mildred Updike who married James Overstreet), and just below them was listed Amon Updike, his wife Isabella, and their children.

Littleberry, Mildred, and their children left Bedford County for a time and then returned by the 1870 Census, for they are listed in Montgomery County, Virginia in the 1850 Census and in Tazewell County, Virginia in the 1860 Census. His mother, Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet, appears to have had a sister, Nancy Gordon, who married Braxton Bailey, and they too settled in Montgomery County. Nancy settled in Knox County, Tennessee, with at least two daughters, after Braxton's death. The Baileys and Overstreets were both living in District 41 in Montgomery County in the 1850 Census, yet they were not neighbors, for they were listed about ten pages apart from one another.

More About Littleberry Overstreet:
Census 1: 1850, Montgomery Co., VA--listed as a white laborer, born in Virginia, age 40, with wife Mildred age 39 and children Jesse Powers (13), Eliza Ann (11), Mary A. (9), Sarah J. (8), Martha K. (5).
Census 2: 1860, Listed in Eastern District of Tazewell Co., VA, age 50, as a farm laborer, value of personal estate $40, with wife Mildred, age 50, and assumed daughters Martha, Mary, and Elisabeth. Addison was also listedas age 1, who was probably Elizabeth's son.
Census 3: 08 Jul 1870, Listed in Otter District, Bedford Co., VA, age 60, with wife Mildred, age 60, assumed daughter Betsy A., age 31, assumed daughter Martha W., age 24, and assumed grandson Addison, age 10. Listed next to brother James and 3 households away from son Jesse.
Comment: Nothing currently known about fate of children besides Jesse-1 died young
Nickname: Berry
Occupation: Farmer
Residence: Aft. 1836, Moved from Bedford Co. to Montgomery Co., VA; was listed in the 1850 Census in Montgomery County; listed in Tazewell Co., VA in 1860 Census; returned to Bedford Co., VA before the 1870 Census where he is listed in 1870 and 1880.

More About Mildred Witt:
Cause of Death: heart disease
Nickname: Millie
Residence: Bedford Co., VA; Montgomery Co., VA; Bedford Co., VA

Children of Littleberry Overstreet and Mildred Witt are:
1 i. Jesse Powers Overstreet, born 18 Dec 1838 in Bedford Co., VA or Montgomery Co., VA; died 08 Jan 1924 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Jane Warner 24 Feb 1862 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. Elizabeth Ann Overstreet, born Abt. 1839 in Montgomery Co., VA?; died 08 Jan 1908 in Roanoke, VA; married Tracey Overstreet?.

Notes for Elizabeth Ann Overstreet:
From "Bedford Democrat," Volume 24, Number 40, 23 January 1908:

Death of a Former Bedford Lady

Mrs. Bettie A. Overstreet died at the residence of Mrs. Fannie Luck, her granddaughter, 421 Rutherford avenue, Roanoke, Jan. 8th after an illness of only a short time. Grandma Overstreet, as she was best known to her Roanoke friends, was loved and respected by every one who knew her. She was for many years a devout Christian lady being a member of the Methodist church. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Dogan.

Mrs. Overstreet is survived by one brother, Mr. Jesse Overstreet of Bedford county. She was aged 69 years and was the great grandmother of the quadruplets born to Mrs. Luck Dec. 24th, 1907.

More About Elizabeth Ann Overstreet:
Census: 1870, Apparently unmarried in 1870 at age 31 as she is listed as Betsy A. Overstreet in her parents' household in Bedford Co., VA
Comment: According to her son's marriage record, his father was Tracey Overstreet, mother Betsy Ann Overstreet, but more than likely, he was out of wedlock and the listing of his father was intended to conceal that. No Tracy Overstreets have been found at that time
Nickname: Bettie

iii. Mary A. Overstreet, born Abt. 1841 in Montgomery Co., VA?.
iv. Sarah Jane Overstreet, born Abt. 1842 in Montgomery Co., VA?; died Abt. 1850 in Montgomery Co., VA.
v. Martha K. Overstreet, born Abt. 1845 in Montgomery Co., VA?.

Generation No. 3

4. Jesse Overstreet, born Bef. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died Oct 1814 in Norfolk, VA. He was the son of 8. Thomas Overstreet, Jr. and 9. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner. He married 5. Elizabeth Gordon 24 Dec 1809 in Bedford Co., VA.
5. Elizabeth Gordon, born Mar 1791 in Loudoun Co., VA; died 27 Dec 1889 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 10. John Gordon and 11. Isabella Willis.

More About Jesse Overstreet:
Burial: probably Norfolk, VA
Cause of Death: Died of typhus fever while in service (probably War of 1812)
Comment: His pension files give two different dates for his death, 7 Oct 1814 and 25 Oct 1814. They indicate that he died of typhus fever while at Norfolk, VA while in service.
Military: 1814, Probably served in the War of 1812 since he died while in service.

Notes for Elizabeth Gordon:
Comments on the wife of Jesse Overstreet:

Below are remarks I made between 2001 and 2007--

A Jesse Overstreet married Polly Gordon on 24 December 1809 according to Bedford County Marriage Records. However, in the estate settlement of Jesse's father Thomas Overstreet, Jr., Jesse's widow was listed as Elizabeth. The 1880 death record of Littleberry Overstreet listed his parents as Jesse and Bettie Overstreet and that he was age 70, indicating he was probably born in 1810. This shows that more than likely Jesse Overstreet was not married more than once. Bob Tinsley concluded that Polly and Elizabeth were the same person, that her actual name may have been Mary Elizabeth Gordon, a daughter of John Gordon who was a neighbor of Thomas Overstreet, Jr. The fact that Jesse had a son named John G. Overstreet gives credence to this possibility; perhaps he was named John Gordon Overstreet after his maternal grandfather. John Gordon's wife was Izra or Isabel Willis, but there is no proof as to whether he had more than one wife or whether she was the mother of Elizabeth Overstreet.

I find it odd that Jesse Overstreet's wife's name would be listed as Polly when she was married and later as Elizabeth and/or Bettie, but Bob Tinsley was a much better genealogist than I am and felt it was plausible.

Fortunately, in 2008, Overstreet researcher Robert B. ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, WA, mailed me his latest printout on descendants of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet, which, thanks to the discoveries of two other researchers, gives documentation that Polly and Elizabeth were the same person. The information from Rick Saunders is quoted as follows:

In several different affidavits at different times, it is shown that Jesse Overstreet died in Oct. 1814 of typhus fever while in service, and that she never remarried. That would explain why no Jesse appears in any of the censuses, but it also raises several questions regarding the children assigned to him born after 1815, including Mary (born circa 1820) on her marriage bond was listed as the daughter of Jesse, deceased.

Bedford Co., VA Court Order Book 46:375, Family History Library microfilm 1,940, 764, gives that Elizabeth Overstreet died at Body Camp, Bedford County on 27 December 1889 entitled to accrued pension, and with no assets, but with the expenses of her last sickness and burial that were borne by Granville Overstreet [her son-in-law], who was to receive $17.

I just wanted to add that she was married as "Polley" and all other records I found of her were as Elizabeth. That it is the same person as that in the pension as Elizabeth she said she was married on 24 Dec. 1809 to Jesse O., and there was also a deposition from the Clerk of Court citing the marriage of "Polly" to Jesse O. on that date to the pension commission.

Further remarks by Bryan Godfrey:

After receiving the above information in 2008 to the effect that my great5-grandmother lived until 1889, I double-checked the Bedford County Death Records to see if Elizabeth's death was recorded in them. It was, and she was listed as Elizabeth Overstreet, age 98, died of old age, father John Gordon (I was hoping it would list her mother too so I could have proof Izra Willis was her mother), and consort Granville Overstreet. Consort means wife, so this must have been a misprint, as Granville was actually her daughter Mary's husband whom she lived with. However, I do not know what became of Mary after the 1880 census. It is possible, but seems far-fetched, that Mary could have died while Elizabeth was living with them and then Elizabeth married her son-in-law, Granville Overstreet. But more than likely, Elizabeth was an unfortunate victim of two errors in recording, both on her marriage record and on her death record, which has prevented her descendants in the past few generations from knowing much about her until now. It would be safe to assume her name might have been Mary Elizabeth Gordon (Polly normally being a nickname for Mary and Bettie a nickname for Elizabeth) if only there were not another Polly Gordon being listed in the records as marrying Daniel Harris, for which John Gordon, likely her father, was surety. More than likely, Elizabeth's actual maiden name was Elizabeth Gordon and she was known as Bettie, and Polly Gordon Harris was her sister for whom she named her youngest child, Mary Harris Overstreet.

It is fascinating to me that Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet, probably my last-living great-great-great-great-great-grandparent, lived so long through so many generations and had so many descendants, but I regret that her grave location is most likely lost, that there are probably no extant photographs of her, and that nothing is known of her ancestry beyond her father and maternal grandfather. She and her father-in-law, Thomas Overstreet, Jr., were both in their 98th year when they died, and she was probably the last surviving child-in-law of Thomas. She was still living when my great-grandfather, Herbert Colon Overstreet (1885-1967), was born, and he was not her first great-great-grandchild, as one of her first great-great-grandchildren appears to have been William Louis Robertson (1878-1963), whose son Louis "Rucker" Robertson (1907-1990) married Herbert's oldest daughter, Lucille Estus Overstreet (1908-1965), the two of them most likely not knowing they were fourth cousins through the Overstreet family. Whether Elizabeth AKA Bettie actually held my Great-Grandfather Herbert C. Overstreet we will never know, but more than likely she saw him, and it seems fairly certain that my Great-Uncle Ruck Robertson's father would have remembered her since he was eleven when his great-great-grandmother died. Whether Bettie saw and/or held Herbert is a question that my great-grandfather's mother, Lucy Cheek Overstreet (1861-1958), could have answered more than fifty years ago, another Overstreet matriarch in my ancestry who lived through many generations and had a prolific family of descendants. The fact that my great-grandfather lived to be a great-grandparent means that he lived through eight generations of the Overstreet family, although both of his Overstreet great-grandparents, Littleberry and Mildred Witt Overstreet, died before he was born; Elizabeth seems to have outlived some, if not all, of her children, including her son Littleberry who died in 1880. Even more interesting is the fact that two other descendants of Elizabeth's were born a few years before her death and lived into the 1970s and 1980s, into my lifetime and in the latter case after I became interested in genealogy as a teenager and knew of Elizabeth and Jesse Overstreet. The one who lived into the 1980s was a great-granddaughter, Bettie Mary Overstreet Carter (1886-1989), who was probably named for her. If only I could have met her, I may have touched hands with someone who probably touched hands with someone born in the 1700s, but perhaps some cousins of mine in her family around my age can claim that distinction! Mrs. Carter may have known where Elizabeth was buried and whether there was a photograph of her. I missed that opportunity to find out by nearly twenty years.

More About Elizabeth Gordon:
Census 1: 05 Jul 1870, Listed in the household (housekeeper) of Mary and Granville Overstreet (her daughter and son-in-law) in Liberty Township (present-day Bedford City), Bedford Co., VA.
Census 2: 21 Aug 1850, Elizabeth Overstreet listed in Southern District of Bedford Co., VA, age 50, in household of Granville Overstreet (son-in-law); unable to read or write. Birthplace listed as Virginia.
Census 3: 1880, Listed as E. Overstreet, age 85, in household of son-in-law Granville Overstreet in Liberty Magisterial District, Bedford Co., VA, The census erroneously refers to as mother of head of household when she was actually Granville's mother-in-law.
Comment 1: 1850, listed as widow of Jesse Overstreet in estate settlement of Thomas Overstreet
Comment 2: Her death record lists birthplace as Bedford, but the fact that her father was listed in her Grandfather Willis' household in Loudoun in 1791 indicates she was probably born in Loudoun Co., VA
Comment 3: It is not known why she was referred to as Polly in her marriage record. She apparently had a sister named Mary or Polly, and the record may have recorded her first name wrongly as Polly instead of Elizabeth.
Comment 4: Several affidavits at different times refer to Jesse Overstreet dying in service in 1814 of typhus and that his widow Elizabeth never remarried
Comment 5: The discovery by researcher Rick Saunders that Jesse died in 1814 opened up a mystery because it questions the paternity of his daughter Mary, born about 1820 according to census estimates. Perhaps she was born around 1815 instead.
Comment 6: There were 2 Jesse Overstreets of the same time period in Bedford. The other, son of James and Frances Eubank Overstreet, is often listed as the one who married Polly Gordon. These Overstreets lived on the north side of Bedford County and were related.
Comment 7: When she married Jesse Overstreet, her name was recorded as Polly Gordon, but all later records refer to her as Elizabeth or Bettie. Jesse's Pension File and other court documents prove she was the same person who married Jesse, as marriage date matches.
Comment 8: 27 Dec 1889, In the Bedford Co., VA Register of Deaths, p. 140, she is listed as Elizabeth Overstreet, age 98, died of old age, father listed as John Gordon, birthplace Bedford. It erroneously lists Granville Overstreet, her son-in-law, as her husband, a likely error.
Event 1: Dec 1854, Gave a deposition in court to qualify for a pension as the widow of Jesse Overstreet who died in service.
Event 2: 27 Dec 1889, According to Bedford Co., VA Court Order Book 46, p. 375, Elizabeth Overstreet died at Body Camp entitled to an accrued pension, and that her last expenses were born by Granville Overstreet (husband of her daughter Mary).
Residence: 1850, living with Mary & Granville Overstreet in Bedford Co., VA

Children of Jesse Overstreet and Elizabeth Gordon are:
2 i. Littleberry Overstreet, born Abt. 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; died Jul 1880 in Staunton River District, Bedford Co., VA; married Mildred Witt 12 Dec 1836 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. James W. Overstreet, born Abt. 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1887 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Lucinda P. Newman 30 Dec 1839 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1815 in Bedford Co., VA; died 24 Feb 1862 in Bedford Co., VA; married (2) Elizabeth Meador 11 Oct 1862 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1825; married (3) Amelia "Mildred" Updike 11 Dec 1873 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1836 in Bedford Co., VA; died 20 Jun 1886 in Bedford Co., VA; married (4) Marinda "Ann" Stinnett 11 Aug 1886; born Abt. 1851 in Bedford Co., VA; died 26 Jan 1926 in Bedford Co., VA.
iii. John G(ordon?) Overstreet, born 24 Aug 1811 in Bedford Co., VA; died 05 May 1882 in Bedford Co., VA; married Lucy S. Dowdy 10 Dec 1834 in Bedford Co., VA; born 09 Oct 1812 in Bedford Co., VA.
iv. Mary Harris Overstreet, born Bef. 1820 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bet. 1880 - 1900 in Bedford Co., VA; married Granville Overstreet 17 Feb 1845 in Bedford Co., VA; born Sep 1822 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 14 Feb 1907.

More About Granville Overstreet:
Occupation: 1860, millwright
Residence: Bedford Co., VA

6. Rowland Witt, born Abt. 1768 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1838 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 12. Lewis Witt and 13. Anna Mills. He married 7. Sarah Duvall 31 Jan 1793 in Campbell Co., VA (bond date).
7. Sarah Duvall, born Abt. 1776 in probably Prince Georges Co., MD, Henry Co., VA, or Franklin Co., VA; died 1822 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 14. Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall and 15. Elizabeth ?.

More About Sarah Duvall:
Nickname: Sally

Children of Rowland Witt and Sarah Duvall are:
i. Anne Witt, married Isaac Wright 13 Dec 1837 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. Agnes Witt
iii. Mary Witt, married James Hamilton 18 Dec 1832 in Bedford Co., VA.
iv. Keziah Witt, married Joshua West 07 Jan 1825 in Bedford Co., VA.
v. Elizabeth Witt, married John Pollard 21 Dec 1824 in Bedford Co., VA.
vi. John Witt, born Abt. 1795 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mildred Howard 21 Dec 1818 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1803 in Bedford Co., VA.
3 vii. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; died 18 Jul 1872 in Bedford Co., VA; married Littleberry Overstreet 12 Dec 1836 in Bedford Co., VA.

Generation No. 4

8. Thomas Overstreet, Jr., born 15 Oct 1744 in Orange Co., VA; died 11 Apr 1842 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 16. Thomas Overstreet and 17. Agnes Stone?. He married 9. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner Abt. 1775 in probably Bedford Co., VA.
9. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner, born Abt. 1755 in probably Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1825 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 18. James Turner, Jr. and 19. ? Phelps?.

Notes for Thomas Overstreet, Jr.:
The following is quoted from Bob Tinsley's speech to the Overstreet Family Reunion on June 20, 1998 at the Terrace Restaurant at Bedford, Virginia:

Thomas Overstreet, Jr. was born about 1750, the son of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet. (When he prepared this speech, Mr. Tinsley was not aware of Thomas Overstreet's 1833 Revolutionary Pension request when he stated he was born October 15, 1744 in Orange County, Virginia). When he was only several years old, his parents moved to Bedford County and settled on Orrix Creek in front of Johnson Mountain. When Thomas Jr. was about thirteen, the family moved again to the northwest to a new home on Falling Creek. Here Thomas Jr. grew to adulthood. In 1773 Thomas was given a 220 acre tract by his father. This tract later taxed as 200 acres was located on the headwaters of the east fork of Difficult Creek in the area now known as Chestnut Fork. It was part of a 1230 acre tract bought by his father from Charles Irby in 1772. Here he apparently lived until about 1787 when he sold the land. During the late 1770's, Thomas apparently served in the American Revolution effort. He was listed as a veteran in his obituary in the "Lynchburg Virginian" triweekly newspaper. He also took a wife named Barsheba who was reputed to be a Native American [incorrect; she was later proven to be white and a Turner], before 1780. Here on Difficult Creek, nearby to his parents, now quite elderly, he began to raise his family. He left Difficult Creek in 1787. The land was sold in 1787 with the part north of Difficult Creek, 140 acres, going to Jehu Lewis and the southern part, 70 acres, going to William Thurman. Thomas, Jr. apparently moved to the 337 acre tract just southeast of the Irby tract. His dad, Thomas, Sr., had purchased the tract in 1786. Here Thomas would remain for the rest of his life. At the end of 1791 Thomas Sr. died. In his will, Thomas Jr. along with his brother, John, were appointed as executors. His mother was pushing 60 years of age. Thomas, Jr. had his hands full. Now the full responsibility for all his father's estate as well as caring for his own family which included a wife and at least nine children. His father's will left him another tract of land which he chose to be the 337 acre tract he was already living on. Either his mother died shortly after her husband, or she went to live with one of her children, for within a year, Thomas, Jr., acting as executor, sold the balance of the Falling Creek home tract to John Mayhew. Thomas, like his father, looked to increasing the land holdings.

In 1793, the year after his father died, Thomas found that the land tract to the east of the 240 acre grant to his father was up for grabs. Thomas, along with William Callaway, submitted a survey for the 840 acres, and in 1795 the grant was issued. However by that time, he had disposed of the 240 acre tract, selling off parcels to John Wigginton, Elijah Weeks, and Thomas' own brother, John.

By 1800 Thomas and Barsheba's children were born, all of them. There were at least fifteen children, and perhaps sixteen. At this time they ranged from adults, Mary and James, both married, to babies, the youngest, Archibald, being born in 1800. Thomas and Barsheba were about fifty years old. Life was apparently good to them since all of the children survived to adulthood and married. Thomas, I am confident, wanted to take care of his sons and daughters as they reached adulthood by seeing to it that they had land. His father for the most part had done this, but then there were only six children. Thomas Jr. had sixteen, and nowhere near the resources to do with. Thus the oldest son (?), James, married in 1799 and went to seek his fortune in Tennessee about 1810. He may have been following in the footsteps of Thomas' brother William, who migrated to Tennessee shortly after 1802. By 1822 Thomas' other brother, John, migrated west, apparently ending up in Ohio, and then to Illinois. Thomas would be the only son of Thomas Sr. who stayed in Bedford County.

Marriages of the children now started happening at a rapid pace. Elizabeth, Sarah, and John married in 1801, William and Jesse married in 1809, Jeremiah in 1810, in 1813 Stephen married, followed by Barsheba in 1815, Littleberry in 1816, Lewis in 1817 (twelve down and four to go). George and Archibald tied the knot in 1820, Thomas Jr. (III) in 1824, and finally Benoney in 1825.

In the midst of all this, Thomas maintained the home tract on Glady Branch 337 acres, and added a 70 acre tract near Dumpling Mountain just to the northeast. He sold this land to his son Lewis in 1817, the year he married. And in the same year he sold off the Island Creek grant. Thus, by the time Benoney married in 1825, he had reduced his holdings to the home tract on Glady Branch. In January, 1824, he sold Benoney 34 1/4 acres of the home tract. He sold another tract, 33 1/2, to Benoney in 1825, shortly after Benoney's marriage. Then disaster struck.

In early 1826 Thomas wife of forty-six years (?), Barsheba, died. She was about seventy years old and Thomas was a few years older than that. Other men would have adjusted to the loss, but not Thomas. After recording a prenuptial agreement, having their individual estates go to their own heirs, he married again on November 30, 1826 to Frances Roberts.

In 1831 another twenty plus acres of the home tract was sold to Benoney. The tracts adjoined each other and were the eastern end of the home tract. Benoney would live there until 1832, when he sold the tracts and moved out of the area to the Craddock Creek area near the Staunton River.

By 1842 Thomas and Frances were becoming so old and feeble that they could not manage their own affairs. Thomas was over ninety (actually ninety-seven) years of age and Fanny was in her seventies. Pleasant Preston appointed a committee to handle their affairs. On April 11, 1842, Thomas died, having lived a long and fruitful life. Oddly enough he didn't leave a will. His wife, Fanny, lived past 1850. Per the prenuptial agreement, the land went to Thomas' children, who couldn't agree on how to divide it. After a chancery suit amongst themselves, the court decreed that it would be sold. On October 28, 1843, Pleasant Preston, now acting on behalf of the court, sold it to James Burroughs. The saga of the Thomases had come to a close. As to the final resting place of these two warriors, we haven't a clue. Thomas, Jr. had probably outlived all his contemporaries. However, his death did not go unnoticed, for it was recorded in the Lynchburg newspaper. He left his estate in the form of hundreds of descendants, many of which still live within a stone's throw of the old homeplace, a fitting tribute. Hopefully this makes people out of these first two. And we can go on for days into the others, but hopefully we gain nothing more tonight; you know who your ancestors were. They were real people. They were busy people. They were prosperous people. They were survivors. Somewhere in the Overstreets there is a rabbit, because they had sixteen kids the second go-round. And I suspect he (Thomas Jr.) may have worn Barsheba out. But these are the first two of the Overstreets. Everybody in here is descended from these people. These are the people who showed up in the county the year after it was founded, and lived to see it become part of the United States, and become populated. And let's face it, there's not a person in this room that could do what these people did. Not anymore. If you have questions, I am available to you, today and tomorrow. Hopefully this has been enlightening. The maps that I handed out should have allowed you, if you wanted to watch through them to follow me across the pieces of land. Hopefully I got it all. Every time I turned up a rock there's another piece of Overstreet under there. Hopefully this will help you folks out.

This ends Mr. Tinsley's quoted information. At the time he gave this speech, he did not know about the booklet "Overstreet-Hall Family," a copy of which is in the Bedford Museum, which traces some of the descendants of Thomas Overstreet, Jr.'s brother, John Overstreet, who settled in Illinois.

The following is quoted from the booklet "Overstreet-Hall Family," a copy of which is in the Bedford Museum, which traces some of the descendants of Thomas Overstreet, Jr.'s brother, John Overstreet, who settled in Illinois, and shows Thomas, Jr.'s Revolutionary War pension application. The portion dealing with Thomas, Jr. is quoted as follows:

Thomas Overstreet 1744-1842
(From his pension application): On the 29th day of October, 1833, personally appeared in open court, before the county court, now sitting, Thomas Overstreet, as resident of Russell Parish in this county and state aforesaid, aged 89 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress, passed June 1833.
"That he entered the service of the United States, under the following named officers and served as herein stated--That in the fall, probably in September, he cannot recollect the day, 1777, he volunteered into the Service of the United States in Bedford County, Virginia, where he resided, under Capt. Samuel Campbell and Lieut. John Phelps, to march against the Indians, who were said at that time to be collected together in the western part of Virginia--His company rendezvoused at Bedford court house, and marched from thence thro Botecourt (sic-Botetourt) to a place called Benhevers Ford on Greenbrier River in Greenbrier County (now in West Virginia), a distance of about 130 miles, where they remained stationed one month--in expectation of the Indians--but not meeting with them, we were then marched to a mill in the same county, where we stationed about two months, still looking out for Indians, but they did not make their appearance. He was discharged by Capt. Campbell sometime in December 1777, but received no written discharge--There was no regular officers with the troops, nor any Continental regiments or companies with the troops during this tour--He was engaged in this tour three months--no other troops of any line along, but his company & no field officers."Again in the winter of 1777, he thinks the last of December, but he cannot recollect the day, he volunteered into the service of the United States, in Bedford county, Va., where he then lived, under Capt. William Leftwich, Lieut. John Phelps to march against the Indians, who were said to be still collected in the western counties of Virginia. His company rendezvoused at Anthony's Store in Bedford county & marched from thence thro Boutecourt to the lead mines on New River in Wythe county, Va. They were stationed at this place five weeks & were engaged in building a Fort, for the purpose of protecting the country against the Indians, but no Indians making their appearance, and the people becoming pacified, they were discharged by Capt. Leftwich, but received no written discharge. He was engaged in this tour five weeks--There were no regular officers, nor any continental regiments, or companies with the troops--no field officers--The troops consisting of his company alone--He was discharged at the expiration of his tour by Capt. Leftwich.
"In the month of October, he cannot recollect the day, 1779, he again volunteered into the service of the United States, in Bedford County, Va. under Capt. Jacob Early of the Virginia militia, for three months--His company rendezvoused at Maj. Ward's in Bedford County, Va. (now Campbell), and marched thence through Charlotte, Prince Edward, Cumberland, Powhatan & Chesterfield counties to Petersburg, where (he) joined the army commanded by Genl. Lawson. His other officers were Col. Charles Lynch, Maj. Leftwich, latter of whom is the same officer he marched under at certain lead mines. He was stationed about half mile from Petersburg during the whole time. Of the regular officers he recollects, Genl. Lawson, Baron Steuben, Col. Holcombe. He was discharged in December 1779 by Col. Lynch, but received no written discharge--He refers to the affidavit of Maj. Samuel Mitchell, who served with this tour, to prove his services.
"In the past two first tours mentioned above, there was but one company at any time in the service--He served not less than the period mentioned below, to wit:--the first tour three months--the second tour, five weeks--& the third tour, three months, for which he claims a pension--He has no documentary evidence of any of his services--He refers to the afidavits of Maj. Sam'l Mitchell & John Turner. Mr. Turner cannot recollect the time, in which, he served the two first tours--"
'In answer to interrogatories he states:
1. He was born in Orange county, Va.--he believes 15 Oct--1744
2. He never had any register of his age
3. He lived in Bedford county, Va. when he entered the service each time & has lived there ever since the revolution & now resides there
4. He entered the service each time as a volunteer.
5. & 6. he has answered to the best of his recollection, in his declaration
7. William Leftwich & Samuel Mitchell are persons to whom he is known in his present neighborhood, who can testify to his character, veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier of the Revolution.'
Record
After relinquishing his claims to any other pension or bounty, except for the present one, he then declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any other agency nor any other state, he signs his name.
William Leftwich, Samuel Mitchell, and John Turner all residents of Bedford county then gave their affidavits as to their memories of Thomas' service: these in turn witnessed by various Justices of the Peace. The court then certified the declarations.
Thomas Overstreet was allowed a pension of $22.88 per year. His allowable service was seven months and forty-five days; the pension was dated back to March, 1833. He died in April, 1842. His entire life was lived in Bedford county (correction-except for about the first ten or so years in Orange County). On November 23, 1826 he had married Fanny Roberts of his home county. She was allowed a pension on her application, dated March 11, 1854, at which time she was eighty-five years of age, and residing in Bedford county. Like many Overstreets, they were Methodists and were married by a Methodist preacher. The account of his War activities as given by Thomas Overstreet gives a good idea of the type of services rendered by the militia forces.

This ends the Hall-Overstreet Genealogy quoted information. A footnote on the bottom of page 68 states, "The names Leftwich, Mitchell, and Turner are prominent in Bedford county history. These pensions may be thought of as the old age benefits and social security of that period of time."

The following is Thomas Overstreet's obituary from the "Lynchburg, Virginia Times":

Another Revolutionary Soldier gone!
--------, at his residence in Bedford county, on the 11th inst., Mr. THOMAS OVERSTREET, supposed to be between ninety and one hundred years old. He has left a numerous train of relations to lament his death. His reasoning faculties had been declining for several years previous to his death.

More About Thomas Overstreet, Jr.:
Burial: Unknown location, probably in the Glady Branch Creek vicinity of Bedford Co., VA where his home tract was, south of Dumpling Mountain and east of Chestnut Fork
Comment: Thomas Overstreet, Jr. was the only son of his parents who remained in Bedford County. His brother William settled in Tennessee, and his brother John settled in Illinois. Most later Overstreets of Bedford descend from Thomas, Jr.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Probably Methodist
Event 1: 1826, His wife Barsheba died early in the year, and on November 30 he married Frances ("Fanny") Roberts, with whom he recorded a prenuptial agreement stipulating that their respective estates would go to their own heirs.
Event 2: 1833, Claimed he was born on Orange Co., VA when applying for a Revolutionary pension
Event 3: Abt. 1842, Pleasant Preston appointed a committee to handle the affairs of Thomas Overstreet, Jr. and his second wife Fanny, who were aging and unable to manage their own affairs.
Military: Bet. 1777 - 1779, Revolutionary War-volunteered as foot soldier-VA Militia-received pension 1833
Occupation: Farmer
Property 1: 1773, Granted a 220 acre tract by his father on the headwaters of Difficult Creek in the Chesnut Fork area of Bedford County; was later taxed as 200 acres. This was part of the old Charles Irby tract, where Thomas, Jr. lived until 1787 when he sold the tract.
Property 2: 1787, Sold his portion of the Irby tract on Difficult Creek to Jehu Lewis (140 acres north of the creek) and William Thurman (70 acres south of the creek). He then moved to his father's 337 acre tract on Glady Branch.
Property 3: Aft. 1787, Apparently for the last 55 years of his life on the 337 acre tract southeast of the Irby tract that had been purchased by his father in 1786. As executor of his father's will in 1792, Thomas, Jr. sold his father's Falling Creek home tract to John L. Mayhew
Property 4: 1793, He and William Callaway had an 840 acre tract surveyed which was east of Thomas, Sr.'s 240 acre grant. A grant was issued to Thomas, Jr. in 1795, by which time he had disposed of the 240 acre tract by selling parcels to his brother John and two others.
Property 5: Bef. 1817, While continuing to live on his Glady Branch home tract, he bought a 70 acre tract to the northeast near Dumpling Mountain, which he sold to his son Lewis upon Lewis' marriage in 1817.
Property 6: 1817, Sold off the Island Creek grant; began reducing his holdings as he was aging.
Property 7: Bef. 1825, Sold his son Benoney (possibly his youngest child) about 67 acres of his Glady Branch tract; sold more than 20 additional acres to Benoney in 1831, which Benoney sold the next year, moving to Craddock Creek area near the Staunton River.
Property 8: 1850, His 15 heirs received $65.70 each-Bedford Order Book 30, pp. 460-63. Upon its discovery by Bob Tinsley about 1993, this document proved extremely valuable because it listed Thomas' 15 heirs; he had no will or other record of his 15 children.
Residence 1: Bef. 1755, Was born in Orange Co., VA, but his parents were living in Bedford Co., VA by 1755 on Orrix Creek in front of Johnson Mountain.
Residence 2: Abt. 1757, His parents moved from the Orrix Creek farm northwest to a farm on Falling Creek, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 3: Abt. 1773, Lived in his early adult years on the Irby tract on Difficult Creek, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 4: Bet. 1787 - 1842, Probably lived on his 337 acre tract on Glady Branch for the last 55 years of his life.
Will: In spite of living to the age of 97 years and having at least 15 children, Thomas Overstreet, Jr. died without a will. His children disagreed on how to divide his property, so a chancery suit decreed it be sold. Pleasant Preston sold it to James Burroughs

More About Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner:
Burial: Unknown location, probably in the Glady Branch vicinity of Bedford Co., VA
Comment 1: The order of births of their 15 children are unknown-listed arbitrarily
Comment 2: Until her maiden name of Turner was determined in 2002, it was believed by some descendants that she was American Indian or part-Indian. The latter may still be true, as her mother's identity has not been determined with certainty (a Phelps or a Wimmer?)
Residence: Bedford Co., VA

Children of Thomas Overstreet and Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner are:
i. James Overstreet, born 15 Jun 1776 in Bedford Co., VA; died 14 Aug 1845 in Maury Co., TN; married Ruth Hurt 13 Sep 1799 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1776 in Bedford Co., VA; died 11 Dec 1867 in Maury Co., TN.

Notes for James Overstreet:
James was the only child of Thomas and Barsheba who is known to have left Bedford County. Most of his descendants are scattered in Tennessee, Missouri, and Oklahoma. One of the notable great-grandsons of James and Ruth Hurt Overstreet was Thomas George Overstreet (1849-1934), who married a Choctaw Indian woman, which enabled him to receive a land grant of over 3000 acres in present-day Oklahoma (then Indian Territory). Thomas George was a son of Clayton and Margaret Cutberth Overstreet, grandson of Thomas and Sally Scott Overstreet, and great-grandson of James and Ruth. He established a large homestead near Sallisaw, Oklahoma with a magnificent house built in 1895, known as the Overstreet-Kerr Farm. For the past few years several Overstreet reunions have been held at this mansion.

I am indebted to James and Ruth Hurt Overstreet's great-great-grandson, Jefferson "Lee" Overstreet (1920-2002) and his wife, Willard Keeling Overstreet (1921-2012), of Texarkana, Arkansas, for their mutual interest in Overstreet family history. They were most gracious in entertaining me and furnishing me with additional Overstreet information when I visited them in the summer of 1997 while I was living temporarily in Austin, Texas. They made several trips to his ancestral home in Bedford County, Virginia to research the Overstreet family and help host Overstreet family reunions, and also helped host reunions at the Overstreet-Kerr Farm at Sallisaw, Oklahoma, the home of his grandfather's first cousin. Several of Mr. J. Lee Overstreet's family married Choctaw Indian women with the ulterior motive of receiving large land grants in Oklahoma. His paternal grandmother was a Choctaw whose family had walked the infamous Trail of Tears from Tennessee to Oklahoma. James was the only child of Thomas and Barsheba who is known to have left Bedford County. Most of his descendants are scattered in Tennessee, Missouri, and Oklahoma. One of the notable great-grandsons of James and Ruth Hurt Overstreet was Thomas George Overstreet (1849-1934), who married a Choctaw Indian woman, which enabled him to receive a land grant of over 3000 acres in present-day Oklahoma (then Indian Territory). Thomas George was a son of Clayton and Margaret Cutberth Overstreet, grandson of Thomas and Sally Scott Overstreet, and great-grandson of James and Ruth. He established a large homestead near Sallisaw, Oklahoma with a magnificent house built in 1895, known as the Overstreet-Kerr Farm. For the past few years several Overstreet reunions have been held at this mansion.

More About James Overstreet:
Burial: Hunter-Kittrell Cemetery, Maury Co TN
Census: 1820
Comment: James Overstreet and his wife Ruth Hurt were second cousins through the Turner family. Her grandparents were Moses Hurt and Ruth Turner.

More About Ruth Hurt:
Burial: Hunter-Kittrell Cemetery, Maury Co., TN
Census: 1850

ii. Thomas Overstreet III, born Abt. 1778 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Creasy 10 Nov 1795 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1774 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Thomas Overstreet III:
"There was one correction I could make based on hearing Bob Tinsley's speech last year at the Bedford Museum. We had been listing Thomas C. Overstreet, who was married three times, as a son of Thomas and Barsheba, but it seems more likely that he was a grandson instead. Mr. Tinsley never could account for the Thomas Overstreet who married Mary Creasey in 1793, but in his last speech he said he must have been the son of Thomas and Barsheba and the father of the Thomas C. Overstreet who married (1) Elizabeth Dickerson; (2) Mary Creasey, and (3) Margaret Taylor. He said the middle initial was probably C for Creasey, the maternal grandfather being Thomas Creasey." per Bryan Godfrey email Dec'01, rbo.

Comment by Bryan Godfrey in 2008: This seems confusing, but it seems most likely that Thomas Overstreet, III's wife was Mary Creasy, and his son Thomas C. Overstreet's second wife was also a Mary Creasy/Creasey.

More About Thomas Overstreet III:
Comment 1: His estimated birthdate seems to match the Thos. Overstreet Sen. who d Apr 1858 of ulcers, age 80, in the poor house, information furnished by H. Beard, Overseer of the poor, according to Bedford Death Records.
Comment 2: There was also a Thos. Overstreet who died 3 Apr 1859 in the Poor House of a sore leg, information also furnished by James H. Beard.

iii. Mary Overstreet, born Abt. 1779 in Bedford Co., VA; died Dec 1850; married (1) Rev. Elijah Hurt 20 Dec 1797 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA?; married (2) Pleasant White 18 Jan 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA.

More About Rev. Elijah Hurt:
Date born 2: Abt. 1772

iv. John Overstreet, born Abt. 1780 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bef. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA; married Peggy Cannady 19 Aug 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1778.
v. William Overstreet, born Abt. 1780 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1859; married Nancy Ann Weeks 01 Nov 1809 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1780.
vi. Sarah Overstreet, born Abt. 1782 in Bedford Co., VA; married John Taylor 19 Mar 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1776.
vii. Elizabeth Overstreet, born Abt. 1784 in Bedford Co., VA; died Dec 1850; married John Richeson (Richardson) 23 Feb 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1780.
viii. Jeremiah Overstreet, born Abt. 1788 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bef. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA; married Lucinda White 25 Oct 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1794 in Pittsylvania Co., VA?; died 18 Jul 1859 in Bedford Co., VA.
4 ix. Jesse Overstreet, born Bef. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died Oct 1814 in Norfolk, VA; married Elizabeth Gordon 24 Dec 1809 in Bedford Co., VA.
x. Littleberry Overstreet, born Abt. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died 24 Oct 1847 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Ann Higgins 01 Nov 1816 in Bedford Co., VA; died 03 Jul 1848 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Littleberry Overstreet:
The following is quoted from Gerald Preas, Overstreet descendant, in regard to Ben T. Overstreet:

In the past we have thought that the illusive father could have been George Dickerson Overstreet. By looking at this Death Cert I have concluded his parents to be Littleberry and Mary Overstreet. The book "Overstreets from Virginia" by Bob Overstreet, Pg. 4 has a Littleberry son of Thomas Jr. born before 1800. His wife, Mary born 1790. Ben T was born 1824 so dates are correct. His son is one on death certificate says Berry and Mary parents. If my name was Littleberry I would go by Berry too. gerald
###
Littleberry/Littlebury Overstreet
Berry Overstreet was my 4th grandfather
Following information was taken from War of 1812 Bounty Land record Group 15, National Archives Wash D.C.
Died 1Oct, 24-1847, Bedford County Va
Married Mary Higgins 11-1-1816
Mary Higgins Overstreet died July 3, 1848
A Guardian of Martha Ann Overstreet, minor, Charles A or H (script too fancy for me to read) brings to court a document requesting land. This was October 15, 1855, saying Martha Ann Overstreet is 18 years and six month old. Littleberry was a Private serving under 7th (Saunders') Virginia Melita, honorable Discharged at Norfolk Va.,1st day of March 1814.
At the time of the Act of September 1850, the following were minors Samuel ?, Mary J? and said Martha Ann Overstreet.
Only comments was Additional Evidence requested
==========
Children of Littleberry Mary Higgins Overstreet
Benjamin T born about 1821 LVA Death Cert lists Berry and Mary as parents Died Dec 11.1893
Ben married Martha Ann Turner 15 Dec 1845

Martha Ann 1 Feb 1837
Samuel unk
Mary J unk
===========
Possible children
Charles
Alexander
Per email to Overstreet Rootsweb 21 Jan 2005, from GERALD PREAS , rbo.
###
Littleberry Overstreet and Mary Higgins of Bedford County Va had these known children.
Source Record Group Records of the Veteran Adm. War of 1812, Littleberry Overstreet, Capt Pleasant Coggins, Co 7, Va Inf. (Saunder's Inf) Nation Archives Wash. D C
At time of the Act Sept 1850 there were three minor children to wit: Samuel (P, H, K or something else as fancy script), Mary J, Martha Ann. Charles ( H or A fancy script) was guardian. Benjamin Thomas the other son was not mentioned, however, on his death cert. is listed Berry and Mary as parents.
Death date of Littleberry Oct 24, 1847 Bedford County Va. Mary Higgins Overstreet died Bedford Va., July 3, 1848. Bible record that Martha Ann Overstreet, born, Feb 1, 1837. Gerald Preas, email 3/9 '08.

More About Littleberry Overstreet:
Comment: It was previously believed that he was the only child of the 15 known children of Thomas and Barsheba Overstreet who did not have children. Evidence has since been located that he had at least 4 children, Benjamin T., Samuel, Mary J., and Martha Ann.
Military: 1812, War of 1812--Private in the 7th Regiment of Virginia Militia. War of 1812 records of the Veterans Administration indicate three minor children, Samuel, Mary J., and Martha Ann, at the time of an 1850 act specifying pensions; Charles Overstreet guardian.
Nickname: Berry

More About Mary Ann Higgins:
Nickname: Polly

xi. Stephen Overstreet, born Abt. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; married Eunice Crouch 06 Mar 1813 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1795 in Bedford Co., VA; died 20 Aug 1879 in Central District, Bedford Co., VA.

More About Eunice Crouch:
Comment: In Bedford Death Records, a Unie Overstreet is listed as dying 20 Aug 1879 in the poor house of old age, age 85; information furnished by R.M. Beard, Friend--this is probably this Eunice Crouch Overstreet.

xii. Lewis Burwell Overstreet, born Abt. 1792 in Bedford Co., VA; died 1863 in Floyd Co., VA; married Mary Ann Davis 04 Sep 1817 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1802; died Bef. 1850.

More About Lewis Burwell Overstreet:
Military: War of 1812
Residence 1: 1840, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 2: 1850, Fayette Co., VA (now in WV)
Residence 3: 1860, Floyd Co., VA

xiii. Barsheba Overstreet, born Abt. 1794 in Bedford Co., VA; died 29 Jun 1858 in Bedford Co., VA; married John Thomas Crouch 06 Mar 1815 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1792; died 17 Jan 1876 in Bedford Co., VA.

More About John Thomas Crouch:
Military: War of 1812

xiv. Benjamin Oney (Benoni) Overstreet, born 25 Apr 1796 in Bedford Co., VA; died 17 Oct 1884 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Anne Preston 28 Feb 1825 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1808 in Bedford Co., VA; died 05 Jul 1885 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Benjamin Oney (Benoni) Overstreet:
The following is quoted from the database of Benoni's great-great-grandson, Robert Bruce ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, Washington:

I have noted on some mailing lists mention of the given name of Benoni. This is an unusual name, and some people think that it is an Italian family name and the child is named after his or her mother's family and then indicate that they have been unable to find a family with that surname.
Actually Benoni is a Biblical name that means "son of my sorrow." It was the original name given to the younger son of the patriarch Jacob. Rachel, his mother, in her dying agony named the child Benoni. (Genesis 35:18).
This name was often given in American Colonial times to a child whose mother died in childbirth or whose father died before the child was born. In fact, this is an important clue. When one sees the name Benoni, look to see what sad event might have caused the child to be given that name. It might have been the death of a grandparent, a parent or a sibling. By Carl Hommel

***************************************************************************

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~overstrt/Land/vapitt.html

Purchases:
1824 - Deed book 18, page 256 - purchased 34+ acres from Thomas Overstreet &ux

1825 - Deed book 19, page 305 - purchased 33 1/2 acres on waters of Gladys Br

1831 - Deed book 22, page 342 - purchased 20A 2R 17P on which Thomas Overstreet resides

The first two purchases were in the name of Benoney Overstreet and the third one in the name of Benjamin Oney Overstreet.

More About Benjamin Oney (Benoni) Overstreet:
Burial: present-day Dixie Acres subdivision of Bedford Co., VA, near Smith Mountain Lake
Residence: Aft. 1832, Settled in the present-day area of Dixie Acres and Smith Mountain Lake in Bedford Co., VA. Part of his property was inundated when the lake was created in the 1950s and 1960s, but not his home and cemetery.

xv. Archibald Overstreet, born Abt. 1800 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Crouch 18 Dec 1820 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1802 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bef. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA.

10. John Gordon, born Abt. 1770; died Aft. 1849 in Bedford Co., VA?. He married 11. Isabella Willis in Loudoun Co., VA?.
11. Isabella Willis, born Abt. 1775 in Loudoun Co., VA; died Aft. 1849 in Bedford Co., VA?. She was the daughter of 22. George Willis and 23. ? Lucas?.

Notes for John Gordon:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/gordon/messages/7341.html

From the Loudoun Co Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1800:

1789C Second Battalion Gorden, John residing with Mayhugh, John and Lynes, Pearson and Carrell, Wm.
1790A [Second Battalion] Gordon, James and Gordon, Jno.
1791A Second Battalion Gorden, Jno. residing with Willis, George
1793B Second Battalion Gordin, James and Gordin, Jno.
1794B Second Battalion Gordin, James and Gordin, John
1795B Second Battalion Gorden, John
1796B Cameron Parish (2nd Battalion) Gorden, John

Order Book M, 14 April 1790
[p. 41] Samuel EDWARDS ass'ee of John WILLIS against John GORDON – upon a petition – Defendant failed to appear; judgment granted Plaintiff against Defendant for 50 Shillings with 5% interest from 25 December 1788 and costs.

Pat Duncan
[emailprotected]

Children of John Gordon and Isabella Willis are:
i. Mary (Polly) Gordon, married Daniel Harris 23 Dec 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1790.

More About Mary (Polly) Gordon:
Comment: Need to prove she is a daughter of John and Izra Gordon. John Gordon was surety for her marriage. Mary Harris Overstreet, daughter of Elizabeth Gordon, was probably named for her and she was probably Mary's aunt.

5 ii. Elizabeth Gordon, born Mar 1791 in Loudoun Co., VA; died 27 Dec 1889 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA; married Jesse Overstreet 24 Dec 1809 in Bedford Co., VA.
iii. Sarah Gordon?, born Abt. 1798.
iv. Nancy Gordon, born Abt. 1800; died Aft. 1859 in Knox Co., TN?; married Braxton Bailey 28 Jul 1817 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1797; died Bet. 1855 - 1860 in Montgomery Co., VA.

More About Nancy Gordon:
Census: 1860, Listed in 12th District of Knox Co., TN with daughter Elizabeth, son-in-law Wade McDaniel, their children, and daughter Isabella.
Comment: Need to prove she is a daughter of John and Izra Gordon. John Gordon was surety for her marriage.

v. Martha Gordon?, born Abt. 1810.

12. Lewis Witt, born Bef. 1735 in present-day Powhatan Co., VA?; died Bef. 28 Feb 1774 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 24. Benjamin Witt and 25. Marianne Chastain. He married 13. Anna Mills Aft. 1755 in Amherst Co., VA?.
13. Anna Mills, born in Goochland Co., VA?; died Abt. 1816 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 26. William Mills and 27. Mary Walton?.

Notes for Lewis Witt:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Witt-773

Biography
Lewis Witt was born to Benjamin Witt and Marianne Chastain about 1730, likely in Goochland County, Virginia Colony (Albemarle Co. was formed from Goochland Co. in 1744.)[1]. Alternatively, Lewis' birth is listed as about 1740 in Virginia in the DAR database[2]. This birth would make him very young (~15) if he married after 1755 (see below).

Lewis married Anne Mills (possibly daughter of William and Mary Mills)[1] sometime after September 1755, when Anne was shown as unmarried in her father's will.

From the WikiTree profile of his father Benjamin Witt Sr.:

By June 1755 Benjamin and his family are living in Prince Edward County. The list of tithables between Bush and Buffalo Rivers, Prince Edward County, taken by Thomas Scott lists Benjamin Witt & his sons Charles Witt & Lewis Witt -- 3 thithables.[3] In 1756 Benjamin purchased land in Prince Edward County with his children Lewis and Charles as witnesses.[4]
Lewis is described in the research by Robert Baird on his father, Benjamin Witt, Sr., as follows[5]:

In 1756, as a resident of Buckingham County, he [Benjamin Witt, Sr.] purchased land in Prince Edward County with his children Lewis and Charles as witnesses [32[6]]. He and his sons Lewis and Charles were all on the 1755 tithables list of Prince Edward, though Charles appealed the tax (probably because he was still a resident of Buckingham). His sons Lewis and Charles both appeared as witness to deeds in the next few years, but Benjamin himself seems to have gone back to Buckingham County where he appears in its records.
Children
The will of Anne (as widow of Lewis Witt) named the following eight children (one deceased and seven living) for Anne and Lewis Witt. Anne's will was probated in 1816[7].

Mills (eldest)
Jesse
John Witt
Rowland Witt
Robert
Agnes Witt (as Agatha Lavender)
Milly (as Milly Whitton)
Elizabeth (as Betsy Calvert, deceased with 5 children)
Land
9 February 1773: Lewis purchased from John Cooper land on Island Creek on Otter River in Bedford County, Virginia Colony. In 1785, following the death of Lewis, this land was the subject of a Chancery Case in Bedford County. See the full transcription in the Images tab[8]. Lewis and Anne's land has been mapped by Elizabeth Shown Mills and is available on her website[9]

Death
Lewis passed away about 1774 in Bedford County, Virginia Colony[10]. He died sometime between February 1773 and March 1774 based on Chancery Case #1785-011 (transcription attached[11]).

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Bedford County Court, 28 Feb 1774, recorded in book 5A, page 261, A Deed, Oglesby to Richard Oglesby Proved by L. Witt; page 263, SL #30579 28 Feb 1774 "On the motion of Ann Witt letters of Admin is Granted her on the Estate of Lewis Witt Dec'd who make Oath & gave Bond w'th Sec'y ac'g to Law. William Adams, John Adams, Thomas Robinson & Robert Mitchell are ap'd to appraise the sd Decedents Estate. Book 5B, page 291, May 1774, An Inventory and Appraisment of the Estate of Lewis Witt Deceased was Exhibited in Court and Ordered to be Recorded.

Bedford County, Virginia, Will Book 1, page 211, SL#30538
Witts List of the Estate of Lewis Witt Dec'd Appraised by Robert\
Appraisment Mitchell, Thomas Robinson & William Adams 21st May 1774 Being first sworn upon\
the Evangelist\
1 Mare L6-19-0 1 ditto L6 L12 - 10 - 0
1 Spinning Wheel 10/ A drawing knife & hd saw 7/6 0 - 17 - 6
1 Cotton Wheel 8/ 1 Rasor and Case 1/ 0 - 9 - 0
Sundry Books 5/6 1 Pocket Book 1/ 0 - 6 - 6
Sundry Shoe tools 3/6 1 froe 2/6 0 - 6 - 0
3 Cows and Calfs L8-0-0 4 Heifers L 4-0-0 12 - 0 - 0
17 Head of Hogs 66/ 2 Axes 10/ 1 Howell? 1/6 3 - 17 - 6
1 Hatchet and 1 Round Shear 0 - 3 - 0
3 Hoes and Mattock 8/ 2 pieces Leather 2/6 0 - 10 - 6
1 Gun 15/ 1 Plain wt Stock and a Chizal 3/9 0 - 18 - 9
1 Read 4/6 3 Pr Cards 6/3 1 Sifter 6d 0 - 11 - 3
1 Sadle and Bridle 15/ 1 Hatchel 5/ 1 - 0 - 0
a parcel of pewter 20/ a parcel of Delphs 6/ 1 - 6 - 0
1 Copper Coffee Pott 9/ 15 Spoons and 1 Kettle 5/6 0 - 14 - 6
a parcel of stone ware and a Candle Stick 0 - 2 - 6
A Table & Chest wt 2 Chairs 0 - 10 - 0
2 Potts 1 Skillet & 1 Frying Pan 0 - 11 - 0
2 pails 4/6 6w Cotton 9/ 2w Wool 3/ 0 - 16 - 6
a Parcel of Flax 2/6 Cotton Yarn & Thread Do Value 33/ 1 - 15 - 6
a plough wt hoe (?) 0 - 3 - 0
2 Beds wt Bedsteds and furniture 5 - 15 - 0
2 Sad Irons 4/ 1 Cow hyde 6/ 0 - 10 - 0
------------------------------------------------------------
Witness our hands date as above 45 - 14 - 0
Robert Mitchell, Thomas Robinson, Wm X Adams. Test...R. Cowan

*******************************************************
-----Original Message-----
From: [emailprotected]
To: [emailprotected]
Sent: Sun, Jun 28, 2009 2:54 pm
Subject: Lewis Witt parentage problem

Mr. Bates,

I spoke with you back in 1997 when I first learned that most now claim my ancestor Lewis Witt was a son of Benjamin Witt and Marianne Chastain. I understand the main claim is based on Lewis appearing on a deed for land purchased by Benjamin Witt in 1756, and on process of elimination because of the fact that William Witt's son John did not mention a son Lewis in his will in 1782. However, I've never felt overly comfortable claiming descent from the Chastain family because Benjamin did not leave a will which may have mentioned Lewis as a son and because Lewis named a son John but did not name any children Benjamin or Marianne.

One item which makes me consider the possibility he was a son of John Witt of Amherst is the fact that Lewis was already deceased when John wrote his will. That could explain why Lewis was not mentioned as a son. Had the will been written prior to Lewis' death in 1774, I would feel more comfortable ruling out Lewis being a son of John and Lucy Littleberry Witt, but the fact that the will was written after his death makes me consider the possibility he was John's son rather than Benjamin's. Secondly, I cannot prove that Lewis Witt married Anne Mills, daughter of William Mills of Amherst, but the fact that the Millses were in Amherst makes me wonder whether Lewis was a son of John and grew up in Amherst rather than in Buckingham or Prince Edward which would be the case if he were Benjamin's son. Even if Anne were a Mills, she may not be identical with William Mills of Amherst's daughter Anna or a sister of the Tory Col. Ambrose Mills; she could have been the daughter of a Mills in Goochland who lived adjacent to a Witt there.

But if Lewis were John's son rather than Benjamin's, I agree it seems unlikely he would have witnessed a deed where his uncle lived when he would have probably lived in Amherst, and that the fact that he witnessed the deed is good circ*mstantial evidence that he was Benjamin and Marianne's son. Also, Lewis settled in Bedford as did his probable brother Benjamin Witt, Jr., and Marianne had a nephew named Lewis Chastain who was probably named for his likely first cousin Lewis Witt.

I'm just looking for any circ*mstantial evidence to make me feel comfortable claiming descent from the Chastain family.

Thanks,

Bryan

Mr. Bates' reply:

Lewis Witt of Amherst Co., was son of Abner Witt b ca 1738. It is telling that Lewis Witt witnessed many deeds for Abner Witt, but not for any other Witt.

This Lewis Witt left an orphan named Jane Lewis Witt, who married her guardian (whose name don't come to mind at the moment).

Lewis Witt of Amherst Co., VA should not be confused with Lewis Witt d1774, who had record in Buckingham and Bedford Co., Va.

All of the children of Benjamin Witt & wife Marianne Chastain ended up in Bedford Co., except Charles Witt, who stayed in Buckingham Co.

Bedford Co. Records
1. Lewis Witt
2. John Witt d after 1821
3. Benjamin Witt d before 1789
4. Marianne Witt Franklin

John Chastain, brother of Marianne Chastain Witt lived in Bedford Co., VA.

Wayne Witt Bates
http://www.witts-end.org

More About Lewis Witt:
Comment 1: The fact that Lewis Witt and Benjamin Witt witnessed Benjamin Witt, Sr.'s purchase of 204 acres in Prince Edward Co., VA in 1756 is the best circ*mstantial evidence that Benjamin was their father.
Comment 2: Earlier genealogies of the Witt family listed Lewis as a son of William Witt, but he was not listed in William's will so later researchers stated he must have been a grandson and narrowed the possibilities down to Benjamin (son of William) as his father.
Comment 3: The fact that Lewis Witt witnessed his father's 1756 purchase indicates he must have been born before 1738, since he had to be over 18 years of age to be a witness to a legal document.
Event: 28 Feb 1774, His wife Anne Witt was granted administration of his estate in Bedford Co., VA.
Residence 1: Abt. 1756, Prince Edward Co., VA
Residence 2: Bef. 1765, Settled in Bedford Co., VA

Notes for Anna Mills:
SL#30579, Bedford County Court Record Book 6, November Court 1774, Guy Smith, Robert Cowan & Robert Alexander appointed to lay off & allot to Ann Witt Widow of Lewis Witt her One third part of the Dec'd Estate. July 28, 1777 (same film etc) Isham Talbot Gent. appointed to Lay off and allot to Ann Witt Widow of Lewis Witt Dec'd her part of the said Decedants Estate in the Room of Robert Cowan who is removed out of this Country.
page 165 to Ann Witt al'd L15 for the support of her and her Family 1 Year in the absence of her Son a Soldier in the Service of the United States wch is orderd to be Cert.
page 200, 24 July 1780, on the mo of Ann Witt her Negroe fellow London is set Levy free.

Bedford County Will Book 4, pages 276-7, SL#30539
In the name of God amen, I Ann Witt of Bedford County State of Virginia being through the attendant surety & goodness of God being of sound state of mind & disposing memory & calling to mind the uncertainty of human life & being desirous to dispose of such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with I give and bequeath the same in manner and form following - Having already given unto my son Mills Witt part of my tract of land (lying in the said county) I give the balance of said tract of land with all the estate I may be possessed of at my decease to be divided amongst my children and grand children in the manner hereafter mentioned & if the said tract of Land cannot be divided to any advantage amongst my children hereafter named it is my desire that my executors hereafter named shall dispose of the same in a manner they shall think most profitable, that is to say they may sell the Said land for cash or on account as they may think best and the money arising from such sale together with such other estate I may be possessed of at my decease to be divided share & share alike as followeth to my sons Jesse John Rowland & Robert each a share, to my daughters Agness & Milly each a share & to my Daughter Betsy Calverts five children to be equally divided amongst them a share equal to that of one of my sons or daughters aforesaid. And lastly I herby constitute & appoint my son Jesse Witt & my friend Henry Adams Executors of this my last will & testament hereby revoking all others wills or testaments by me heretofore made - In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal this 9th day of December in the year 1811.
Signed sealed published & Declared her
as & for the last Will & Testament Anne X Witt (seal)
of the above named Anne Witt mark
in presence of us
Henry Brown, Joel Crumpacker, George White
Whereas I some time past lent my son Jesse Twenty five dollars & my son in Law william Whitton Twelve Dollars my will is that after my decease the sum of twenty five dollars shall be reducted from my son Jesses part of my estate and that the sum of Twelve dollars shall be reducted from my daughter Milly Whittons part of my estate. her
18 Oct 1813 Anne X Witt
Henry Brown mark
Joel Crumpacker, George White
At a court held for Bedford County at the Courthouse the 25th day of October in the year 1816 This last Will & Testament of Anne Witt Dec. was exhibited in court & proven by the oath of Henry Brown, Joel Crumpacker & George White the subscribing witnesses and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Jesse Witt one of the Executors therein named who made oath & gave bond & security according to law - certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due form. Liberty being reserved the other executor to join in the probate when he shall think fit.

Teste, J. Steptoe, C. B. C.

A lengthy and detailed accounting is found in Will Book 5, pages 196-7, on SL#30539, copy in files.

*******************************************************

*******************************************************
http://www.genforum.familytreemaker.com/witt/messages/2079.html

Proof that Lewis Witt m Anne Mills of Amherst, VA?
Posted by: Bryan Godfrey Date: February 17, 2002 at 07:00:01
of 2889

My hope is to be able to prove that the William Mills who died about 1767 in Amherst County is the father of Anne Mills who married Lewis Witt. So far the only circ*mstantial evidence I have found for her being a Mills is that she named a son Mills Witt, and the only circ*mstantial evidence of a connection with the William/Ambrose Mills family is the Witt family's residence in Amherst, the fact that William Lavender, who married Lewis' daughter Agatha Witt, was a witness to William Mills' will, and that the Key family of Amherst was associated with both the Witts and Millses. Also, there was a 1757 land record referring to John Witt's land in Goochland which bordered the property of a William Mills, but this bothers me because the William Mills, father of Ambrose, should have been living in Amherst by then. William Mills of Amherst refers to a daughter Anna Mills, whereas Lewis Witt's wife called herself Anne Witt in her 1811 Bedford County will. I ordered a book last year on the descendants of Ambrose Mills, written by Marshall Styles who coincidentally wrote a book on a North Carolina Quaker family, the Lambs, that he and I also descend from. However, I would enjoy his Mills book more if I were more convinced Lewis Witt's wife were of that same family. Every Witt genealogy I have read says Lewis Witt married Anne Mills, and later ones have listed her parents as William and Mary Mills, whose son Ambrose was the noted Tory who was hung at King's Mountain, NC in 1781.

Posted by: Connie Moretti (ID *****6043) Date: February 24, 2003 at 17:46:59
In Reply to: Proof that Lewis Witt m Anne Mills of Amherst, VA? by Bryan Godfrey of 2889

It's been over a year since you posted your query, but I felt compelled to reply since Lewis and Anne are my direct ancestors. There will probably never be a single document that proves the connection, but there is certainly an accumulation of evidence pointing that way. For one, William Mills lived within a short distance of the Witt family on Pedlar Creek on the Amherst/Bedford line. Anne was one of the younger children, not yet married at the time the 1755 will was written. In addition to naming her first son Mills, her next two children, Milly and Jesse, were apparently named for the siblings closest in age to her. Like Mills, both are somewhat unusual names. At the time of her will and death Anne had been the widow Witt for forty years and it would be natural for her to use her married name.

Connie Moretti

More About Anna Mills:
Probate: 28 Oct 1816, Bedford Co., VA
Property 1: 1778, Purchased 15 acres from James Chastain
Property 2: According to a map in "Finding the Father of Henry Pratt of Southeastern Kentucky," National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume 100 Number 2, Anne Witt owned 2 tracts at confluence of Island Creek and Big Otter River, Bedford Co., VA.
Property 3: 1811, Sold 70 acres to John Wood

Children of Lewis Witt and Anna Mills are:
i. Agnes Witt, married Claiborne Dowdy 22 Aug 1795 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1758 in Bedford Co., VA; married William Whitten.
iii. Agatha Witt, born Abt. 1760 in Bedford Co., VA; married William Lavender.

Notes for Agatha Witt:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/witt/messages/3197.html

"Jesse (Witt) was the Executor of his mother's (Ann) will. In his settlement of the account on 6/25/1820 he lists Agnes Lavendar, Milly Whitton, Jesse Witt, John Witt, Elizabeth Calvert, Five Children, and Rowland Witt are named to receive one-seventh share. Robert Witt, William Lavinder, Polly Calvert, John W. Lavinder, Nancy Lavinder, Charles Lavinder, Clif Lavinder, Bird Lavinder, and Dosha Lavinder, are all children of Agatha (Witt) Lavinder"

I have found a formal record of an Agnes Witt marrying a Clairbourne Dowdy, but not a William Lavender.

iv. Jesse Witt, born 11 May 1762 in Bedford Co., VA; died 03 Feb 1842 in Sandy River area of Prince Edward Co., VA?; married Alice (Alcy) Brown 06 May 1786 in Bedford Co., VA; died 09 Jul 1844.

Notes for Jesse Witt:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vafrankl/jesseandalicebrownwittw6524.htm

Pension Application of Jesse and Alice Brown Witt: W6524

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

State of Virginia}

County of Bedford Sct}

On this 30th day of August in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared before the County Court of the said County of Bedford in the state aforesaid, Jesse Witt a resident of the County and state aforesaid, aged according to his belief seventy years on the 11th day of May last past, who being first duly affirmed according to law, doth on his affirmation, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress, passed June 7th 1832, that he enlisted in the army of the United States on the first day of March 1777 with Capt. George Lambert and served in the 14th Regiment of the Virginia line under the following named officers towit Colo [Charles] Lewis who commanded the Regiment in the first instance and Abraham Buford who was the Major of the same, George Lambert the Captain [last name illegible] the 1st Lieutenant, Rogers the 2nd Lieutenant and Ward[?] the Ensign of the Company in which the applicant enlisted he resided in the said County of Bedford in the aforesaid state at the time of his enlistment and marched from the said County on the 25th of March 1777 with his company which was joined by other companies at Fredericksburg, the route was subsequently through Alexandria Georgetown and Baltimore to the main Army under General Washington then lying at Middlebrook in New Jersey. Upon joining the army the 14th Regiment was a part of the brigade under General Weeden [sic: George Weedon] in the first instance. he continued in the service under the immediate command of General Washington during the whole subsequent period of his service and was in the battles of Brandywine [11 Sep 1777] & Germantown [4 Oct 1777] in the course of the last mentioned year – after the battle of Germantown (but at what particular period or in what order he cannot remember) Col Davis & Col Parker [see note below] commanded the Regiment and Gen'l. Muhlenburg [sic: Peter Muhlenberg] the Brigade to which he belonged. The army to which he was attached went into Winter quarters at Valley forge and in the spring of 1778 crossed the delaware river and pursued the British army through New Jersey to Monmouth and thence they marched to White Plains in New York and afterwards to West Point. at the latter place he was compelled by sickness to quit the field & was sent to a hospital – his company quartered that winter as he understood at Middlebrook in New Jersey, at which place he joined it in the month of May 1779 but his infirmities and & inability were such that he was shortly afterwards sent back to the Hospital and did not join his company again til shortly before his discharge, on the 10th of September in the year 1779 in the high lands of New York. he received his discharge which was signed by Colo. Parker & Gen'l Muhlenburg. He enlisted for the term of three years and after serving [two or three words illegible] from the foregoing dates more than two years, was discharged in consequence of disability incured in the performance of his duty. The discharge given him by Colo Parker & Gen'l. Muhlenburg bears testimony to the fidelity with which he has served his Country, and recommended him to the legislature of Virginia as deserving the attention and assistance of the Government. This discharge he shortly afterwards placed in the hands of the delegates representing his county in the General assembly and was in consequence thereof placed in the invalid pension list and drew for many years half pay or forty dollars per year. The discharge above mentioned he has never seen since he sent it to Richmond and supposes it may be filed and preserved in the archives of the State. – He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity except the present & he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any state except in the State of Virginia.

Affirmed and subscribed the day and year aforesaid [signed] Jesse Witt

NOTES:

In May 1779 Gen. Washington assigned Col. Richard Parker to recruit reinforcements for Charleston SC, and Col. William Davies was Parker's temporary replacement.

On 25 March 1843 Alice Witt, 79, applied for a pension stating that she married Jesse Witt (year illegible), and he died 3 Feb 1842. With her application is a copy of a statement signed by Alcy Brown and witnessed by Henry Brown Jr and Samuel Brown that, "I being of age intend marriage to Jesse Witt," dated 6 May 1786. There is also a copy of a bond signed by Jesse Witt and Henry Brown, Jr. dated 6 May 1786 in Bedford County for the marriage of Witt to Alcy Brown. Documents in the file state that Alice Witt died 9 July 1844 leaving the following living children: Lettice Witt, Elizabeth Witt, Daniel Witt, Alice Witt, Milly Witt, and Jesse Witt.

v. Robert Witt, born Abt. 1765 in Bedford Co., VA; died 31 Mar 1849 in Logan Co., KY; married Nancy Reese 19 Apr 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1836 in Logan Co., KY.
6 vi. Rowland Witt, born Abt. 1768 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1838 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Sarah Duvall 31 Jan 1793 in Campbell Co., VA (bond date); married (2) Sophia Wright 14 Sep 1822 in Bedford Co., VA.
vii. John Witt, born Abt. 1769 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1808 in Logan Co., KY; married Keziah Creasey.
viii. Mills Witt, born Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA; died 15 Feb 1863 in Liberty, Dekalb Co., TN; married Barthena (Bethani) Creasy 27 Apr 1797 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1768.
ix. Elizabeth Witt, born Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 22 Sep 1806 in Bedford Co., VA; married Francis Calvert 22 Dec 1791 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1751 in Prince William Co., VA; died 11 Jul 1832 in present-day Kanawha Co., WV.

14. Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall, born Abt. 1750 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died Bef. Sep 1809 in Muhlenberg Co. , KY. He was the son of 28. Benjamin Duvall and 29. Anne Griffith. He married 15. Elizabeth ? Bef. 1791.
15. Elizabeth ?, born Abt. 1750; died Aft. 1809 in Muhlenberg Co., KY.

Notes for Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

BENJAMIN SKINNER DUVALL
176... - 18...

Benjamin Skinner Duvall, known generally as Skinner Duvall, was the son of Benjamin and Ann (Griffith) Duvall and was born in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges County, Maryland. He accom­panied his parents to southwestern Virginia, where in 1783 he was listed as a tithable in Bedford County.
On September 24, 1783, as Skanner Duvall he purchased from James Stephens for £30 the tract of land on which Stephens was then living containing 30 acres, beginning at a Spanish oak standing on the Black Water River on "Henry County side."1 On November 23, 1784, he bought of William Mead, of Bedford County, for £20 a tract of 216 acres beginning at Ambrose Rain's corner in Peddy's Hollow and on the north side of Black Water Run. Martha Mead, wife of William, waived all dower rights.2
His plantation lay apparently between Bedford and Franklin Counties, as sometimes his deeds of conveyance were recorded in Bedford and at times in Franklin County. While he does not appear on the land-tax lists for Bedford County between 1797-1807, he is regularly taxed in that county for personal property. From 1801 to 1806 there were two male tithables in his household, and while he was not taxed for slaves, his horses consisted of various times between two and four. In 1807 the last year for which he was listed as a tithable in Bedford County it was noted that he was of "the southern district." Lewis Duvall appears as a tithable in 1807, and whereas Skinner had two males in 1806 and only one in 1807, it is assumed that Lewis appearing for the first time was his son and had established his own household.3
On March 4, 1787, of Franklin County, he purchased from Robert Mead, of Bedford County, for £20 a tract of land beginning at Ambrose Rain's chestnut tree and consisting of 216 acres.

His wife was Elizabeth --- who joined him in a deed of February 7, 1791, when he sold to Jacob Criss, of Franklin County, Virginia, for £ 8 a tract of 246 acres lying on the north side of Black-water River beginning at Peday's Hollow and adjoining the land of Ambrose Rain.5
On October 23, 1799, he bought of James Laird, of Iredell County, North Carolina, for £296 land in the latter county, at which time Lewis Duvall and David Beale witnessed the conveyance. On Jan­uary 12, 1802, for $520 he sold the land to Mareen Duvall, of Iredell County. There is no record of his living in Iredell County, and in 1802 at the time of sale he was styled of "Bedford County."
There are no wills nor administrations accounts for him recorded in either Franklin nor Bedford Counties.
__________
SOURCES: 1. Bedford Co. Deeds, Liber 7, folio 333; 2. Bedford Co. Deeds, Liber 7, folio 448; 3. Bedford Co. tax lists, Richmond State Library; 4. Franklin Co. Deeds, Liber 2, folio 46; 5. Franklin Co. Deeds, Liber 2, folio 163.

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http://files.usgwarchives.net/ky/muhlenberg/wills/d6400002.txt

Source: Will Book 1 Page 111 & 112

In the name of God Amen

I Skinner Durall, *(Duvall) of Muhlenberg County, being of sound mind and memory,
do desire this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others
heretofore by me made. and recommending my soul to God who gave it to me and
my body to the dust in comfortable hopes for a joyful resurrection. and as
to my worldly goods which it hath pleased God to bless me with, I give in
the manner following:

My desire for all my debts first to be paid then I give and bequeath to my
beloved wife Elizabeth Durall, *(Duvall) my land and plantation whereon I now live,
and all my household furniture, and all my stock of all kinds during her
natural life, then to be divided betwen my sons, Howard Durall *(Duvall) and
Benjamin Durall, *(Duvall) and **----? Durall, *(Duvall) except five shillings a piece
to all the rest of my children and ten pounds in trade to Manly Moore.

I appoint my beloved wife Elizabeth Durall *(Duvall) and Elisha Durall *(Duvall)
my joint executors to this my last will and testament.
This 17th day of Sept. in the year 1809

Skinner ( X his mark ) Durall *(Duvall) (seal)
Test ;
Micah Wells,
Spencer O'neal,
Robert Elder

Muhlenberg Co. Sct. Oct. Term 1809
The last will and testament of Skinner Durall *(Duvall) dec'd, was produced into
court and proved by the oaths of Spencer O'Neal, and Micah Wells subscribing
witness thereto and ordered to be recorded.

Att. Chas. F. W i n g

NOTE:
* According to Sandra Kidd (a descendant of Skinner DUVALL says that the
surname Durall is mis-spelled and should be DUVALL in this document, she has
several documents of documentation of the spelling...

** Sandra also believes that ----? Durall, is also Elisha Duvall one of the executors...

More About Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall:
Residence 2: 1783, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 3: Bet. 1807 - 1809, Muhlenberg Co. , KY

Children of Benjamin Duvall and Elizabeth ? are:
i. Anna Duvall, married Henry Jenkins 24 Dec 1804 in Bedford Co., VA (bond date).
7 ii. Sarah Duvall, born Abt. 1776 in probably Prince Georges Co., MD, Henry Co., VA, or Franklin Co., VA; died 1822 in Bedford Co., VA; married Rowland Witt 31 Jan 1793 in Campbell Co., VA (bond date).
iii. Keziah Duvall, born Abt. 1781; married David Farley 20 Aug 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1780; died Apr 1860 in Campbell Co., VA.
iv. Jemima Duvall, born Abt. 1785; died 09 Nov 1851 in Clark Co., OH; married Pleasant Howard 23 Aug 1804 in Bedford Co., VA; born 08 Jan 1783; died 21 Sep 1852 in Clark Co., OH.

More About Jemima Duvall:
Burial: Knob Prairie Cemetery, Mad River Township, Clark Co., OH

v. Lewis Duvall, born Abt. 1785; died Bet. 1843 - 1850 in Chariton Co., MO; married Margaret Butler 1804 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1782 in VA; died Aft. 1850.

Notes for Lewis Duvall:
Imported file from Muhlenberg website described Lewis as moving to Keatsonville, KY in 1844 with six younger children. There is no Keatsonville, KY, but Keytesville is the seat of Chariton Co., MO. Daughters Sarah and Nancy were married in Chariton in 1843 and 1845, respectively. Wife Margaret listed as head of household in 1850 Chariton Co. census. Lewis likely died in Chariton Co. between 1840 and 1850.

More About Lewis Duvall:
Died 2: Aft. 1840
Residence 1: Aft. 1804, Settled in Muhlenberg Co., KY
Residence 2: Aft. 1843, Chariton Co., MO

More About Margaret Butler:
Date born 2: TN
Nickname: Peggy

vi. Benjamin J. Duvall, born Abt. 1790 in Virginia; died Aft. 1860 in Muhlenberg Co., KY or Ohio; married Mary Jane Whitaker 13 Jan 1817 in Butler Co., KY; born Abt. 1792 in KY; died 22 Apr 1867.

Notes for Benjamin J. Duvall:
Death date is approximate. There is a death of a Benjamin Duvall recorded in Ohio county KY in 1872 or 1873. This is likely the same person. (From Barry Wayne Duvall)

More About Benjamin J. Duvall:
Date born 2: Abt. 1790, VA
Died 2: Abt. 1872, Ohio Co., KY

More About Mary Jane Whitaker:
Date born 2: Abt. 1792, Kentucky
Died 2: Aft. 1850, Muhlenberg Co., KY
Burial: Arnold Cemetery, Ohio Co., KY
Fact 7: Lived in Butler Co., KY
Nickname: Polly

vii. Howard Duvall, born Abt. 1790 in Virginia; died 14 Apr 1853 in Muhlenberg Co., KY; married Quinney Wells 11 Jun 1811 in Muhlenberg Co., KY; born Abt. 1791 in North Carolina; died 07 Jun 1856 in Muhlenberg Co., KY.

Notes for Howard Duvall:

viii. Archibald Duvall, born Abt. 1798 in Virginia; died Aft. 01 Jul 1870 in Muhlenberg Co., KY?; married Sarah Wells 16 Mar 1826 in Muhlenberg Co., KY; born Abt. 1805 in Tennessee; died Aft. 01 Jul 1870 in Muhlenberg Co., KY?.

Notes for Archibald Duvall:
In the 1860 census, household of Archibald Duvall included Francis M, 14 year old male, and Amanda, 4 year old female. Do not list these as children, because Francis did not appear in household in 1850 census, and Amanda would have been born to a woman 51 years old.

Notes for Sarah Wells:
In the 1860 census, household of Archibald Duvall included Francis M, 14 year old male, and Amanda, 4 year old female. Do not list these as children, because Francis did not appear in household in 1850 census, and Amanda would have been born to a woman 51 years old.

Generation No. 5

16. Thomas Overstreet, born Abt. 1720 in King and Queen Co., VA?; died Abt. 1791 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 32. (probably) John Overstreet and 33. (possibly) Elizabeth ?. He married 17. Agnes Stone? Bef. 1744 in Orange Co. or Caroline Co., VA?.
17. Agnes Stone?, died Aft. 1791 in Bedford Co., VA?. She was the daughter of 34. William Stone and 35. Elizabeth Ann ?.

Notes for Thomas Overstreet:
Descendants of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet suffered a great loss with the passing of James Robert ("Bob") Tinsley at Lynchburg, Virginia on Wednesday, September 26, 2001, following a short battle with cancer at the age of 59.

Bob Tinsley's passion was local history and genealogy, especially that of Bedford County, Virginia. In that county he was especially authoritative on the history and families of the Taylor's Mountain area of northern Bedford. Three families of Overstreets, of undetermined connection to one another, settled in Bedford County in the late 1700's. One family of the name settled around Taylor's Mountain, and although he was not an Overstreet descendant, Mr. Tinsley became especially interested in the genealogy of all three Bedford Overstreet families. He was probably the first person to meticulously research the records concerning the first few generations of the family of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet, the first Overstreets to settle in Bedford, who came there around 1755. They founded the Overstreet clan which became extremely prolific in the Southside of Bedford County, mainly due to the fact that their son Thomas, Jr. had at least fifteen children. Another son of theirs settled in Illinois and another in Tennessee. Mr. Tinsley became interested in furthering his research on the Overstreets not only because persons of the name spread throughout Bedford County and intermarried with other Bedford families, but also because he observed it was the most common surname in the local telephone directory. Although his research originated from an interest in the Taylor's Mountain Overstreets who were of no known kinship to the Thomas Overstreet family of the Southside, Mr. Tinsley in his final years concentrated on the latter lineage.

Mr. Tinsley's remains were cremated and the ashes scattered from the top of Taylor's Mountain. It is requested that memorial contributions be made to Bedford City-County Museum, which will be involved in preserving his research and unpublished manuscripts.

Below is his obituary from the Lynchburg "News and Advance":

James Robert Tinsley

James Robert Tinsley, 59, of Lynchburg, died Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2001. He was the husband of Vickie Adamson Tinsley.

Born in New London, Conn., he was a son of Catherine Hanel Tinsley of Lynchburg and the late Isaac Dabney Tinsley.

Bob was a highly respected for his thorough research into histories of families and the land in Central Virginia, particularly Bedford County. He was often called upon to speak about his work. He fascinated his audiences with his ability to relate for hours at a time with minute details without referring to notes.

He not only was a contributor to the writing in Vol. III of "Bedford Villages, Lost and Found," but his manuscript, "An in Depth Study of Taylor's Mountain" in Bedford County", that is now being readied for publication.

In addition to his wife and mother, he is survived by three sons, James Robert Tinsley Jr. of Amherst, William Phillip Tinsley, Kenneth Allan Tinsley, both of Lynchburg; two brothers, William Tinsley of Hawaii, Phillip Edward Tinsley of Lynchburg; a sister, Patricia Ellis of West Virginia and four grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Monday in the Chapel of Heritage Funeral Service by the Rev. Nigel Alleyne.

In lieu of flowers please make memorial contributions to Bedford County Museum, c/o James Robert Tinsley Fund, 201 E. Main Street, Bedford, VA 24523.

Heritage Funeral Service and Crematory, 427 Graves Mill Road, 239-2405 in charge of arrangements.

To summarize his years of research in which he compiled voluminous notebooks on Overstreet families, Mr. Tinsley delivered several speeches at reunions, museum functions, and genealogical meetings. Two such speeches are cited in the "More About" information herein on Thomas Overstreet, Sr. and Jr. All of us with mutual interests in genealogy and Overstreet descent are especially grateful to Mr. Tinsley for his time and efforts.

The following information on the lives of Thomas Overstreet and his wife Agnes is quoted from a speech given by James Robert ("Bob") Tinsley, a renowned Bedford County family historian, on June 20, 1998, for a reunion of the Thomas Overstreet family at the Terrace Inn Restaurant at Bedford, Virginia:

Thomas Overstreet was the first person of that name to appear in the records of Bedford County. In 1755, just one year after the formation of the county from Lunenburg County, he made a purchase of 400 acres near the headwaters of the southwestern tributary of the Otter River. This creek came to be known as Orrix Creek, and flows in front of a low mountain ridge known as Johnson Mountain. This creek was named for Benjamin Orric, who had obtained land along the creek as one of the first landowners in the area. This portion of the Virginia colony was basically wilderness to these original settlers who started obtaining land grants along the Otter River in the late 1740's. The Native Americans had of course inhabited the area for centuries. While they didn't claim ownership of the land, they did consider the settlers as intruders into their ancestral hunting areas. And as more and more settlers moved into the area, conflicts were inevitable. However, the English king did claim ownership to the land. And, to encourage more settlement, he granted off large tracts of land to wealthy colonists living in the eastern part of the colony. These patent holders then sold off such subdivided tracts to settlers as they came in. Such men as Obadiah Woodson, Archibald Cary, George Walton, and Richard Randolph patented huge tracts in what is now Bedford County. In fact, Richard Randolph patented in 1755, the same year as Thomas Overstreet appeared, 14,000 acres. This grant included some of the headwaters of Falling Creek, another southwestern tributary of the Otter River, and began a few miles to the northwest of the Orrix Creek site. Between these two creeks flowed another creek, called Island Creek. The Overstreets would become involved in the future of all three of these creeks.

Thomas and his family, which already included a wife and several children, settled on the Orrix Creek farm. This farm is now currently located to the south of Route 24 as you come up the hill from crossing Otter River.

Life on a farm in the wilderness was not easy. First the land had to be cleared, crops planted. Thomas had no adult family to aid in this task, and it is assumed he did the bulk of the work himself. There were few neighbors to help, but neighbors of course had similar problems. There was no settlement nearby. The courthouse was at New London, which would be laid out as a village in 1757. This was more than 10 miles away. Few roads even existed. For all intents and purposes, these settlers had to be self-sufficient.

Of course to add to all their challenges, the threat of problems with the Native Americans always existed. Thomas Overstreet was the only Overstreet in the county until after the American Revolution. The county, when cut off from Lunenburg County, covered the area from the middle of the present Appomattox County westward to the middle of present Franklin County. We do not know at this time where Thomas came from. The nearest Overstreets were located in what is now Prince Edward County and Amelia County. They appear in that area from the late 1740's on and are suspected close kin to Thomas. (At this time Mr. Tinsley did not know that Thomas' son, Thomas, Jr., stated in his 1833 Revolutionary War pension application that he was born in 1744 in Orange County, Virginia, so it can now be assumed Thomas Sr. came from Orange County to Bedford County between 1744 and 1755).

Thomas' wife was named Agnes, and they were married shortly before coming to Bedford. They probably had at least two, if not three, of their six children when they arrived. Agnes must have been a strong woman, for she helped her husband build a home and a family in the wilderness and still outlived him past 1793. Things apparently went well for the Overstreets. By 1763 after eight years on the Orrix Creek farm, Thomas was able to look at the expansion of his landholdings. To the north the 14,000 acre land grant of Richard Randolph was being sold off. Randolph had died, and his heirs were selling off parcels through their agent, Richard Stith. Already tracts had been sold to Richard Turner, John Phelps, Richard Ballard, and others. But there was still the bulk of the land on the north fork of Falling Creek, now known as Bold Branch. One year later he purchased an additional 64 and 136 acres adjoining the 346 acres. With the additions of this farm, now totalled 541 acres. What's more, there was still room for expansion. In early 1765 Matthew Talbot and William Mead entered a 900 acre survey for a land grant east of the Randolph, now Overstreet, tract on Falling Creek. At the same time 235 acres of the 900 acres was surveyed for Thomas Overstreet. This tract adjoined the 541 acres on the northeast side across the old Randolph line. It was apparently bought from Mead and Talbot out of what they were getting as a land grant. This addition would expand the Falling Creek farm to 776 acres. Apparently Thomas relocated to this farm about this time, for in 1765 he sold the Orrix Creek farm to John Perry. Apparently when the Mead-Talbot land grant was issued in 1769, there was an error in the amount of land sold or transferred to Thomas Overstreet. To rectify this error a deed was issued to Thomas from Robert Mead for 35 acres, bringing the 200 acres back up to 235.

While waiting for this, Thomas was able to make another land transaction. In 1769 he was able to buy a 350 acre parcel of the Archibald Cary 10,000 acre land grant, which he immediately sold to Adam Lynn. This tract was on Wolf Creek about ten miles west of Falling Creek and probably was never farmed by Thomas. By 1770, all of the Overstreet children were probably born. At least two of the sons were now nearing adulthood. Thomas could now look forward to having grown sons to help him develop the land. To this end he sold the 200 acres obtained from Mead and Talbot to Edwin Franklin in mid-1771. This sale money mayhave been in the works before then because the 35 acres deeded to Thomas a little over two months before the Franklin deed was retained by Thomas as part of the home tract. It didn't go with that. Next in 1772 Thomas bought a 1230 acre tract from Charles Irby. This tract was located on both sides of the east fork of Difficult Creek and had just been granted to Irby the year before in 1771. Later in 1772, Thomas sold off the southwest portion of the Falling Creek farm to James Robertson, perhaps to help cover costs.

There were at least six children in the Overstreet family. Their birthdates for the most part have not been accurately documented. But in approximate order were as follows: Thomas, Jr. born sometime before 1752 (1744 to be exact, as Mr. Tinsley did not know this at the time of his speech); William, born before 1758; Nancy Ann, born in the 1750's; John born 10/10/1758; Mary born in the 1760's; and Elizabeth born in the 1760's. It is suspected that the first to marry was Nancy Ann, who married John Haile. In 1772, as was previously mentioned, Thomas sold approximately 200 acres of the Falling Creek farm to James Robertson. This tract included all the 131 acres on the southwest and on the southwestern part 70 acres of the original 346. This left a residue of 346 acres plus the 64 acre addition plus the 35 acres. This remained as the home tract until Thomas' death.

In 1773 Thomas began splitting up and selling off the Irby tract on Difficult Creek. First he sold off the northeast corner 304 acres to Zachariah Davis. Then he sold a 322 acre parcel to the west of that to John Haile. John had probably already married Thomas' daughter Nancy Ann. In May of 1773 he deeded 222 acres of the Irby tract to his son, Thomas, Jr. This tract was the parcel just west of the parcel he had just sold to his son-in-law John Haile. The balance of the Irby tract was held for another two years, with the tract being either rented or cared for by Thomas Jr., who lived next door. In December, 1773, Thomas entered two surveys for land grants of his own. Apparently the land located on Island Creek which was unclaimed, first survey was for 240 acres, the second survey for 700 acres adjoining the 240 on the south end and running westward across headwaters of Falling Creek. These surveys were probably followed by applications for land grants.

By 1774 the situation with the Native Americans had erupted. With English challenging the French over who would control the lands to the west of the Appalachian Mountains and each side having allies among the native tribes, war broke out. The Bedford Militia was mobilized and sent on the Point Pleasant Campaign. Thomas' son, William, was old enough to participate, and went as a private in Thomas Buford's company.

In 1775 Thomas sold off the last remaining parcel of the Irby tract, to Isiah Turner. This tract was adjacent to Thomas Jr.'s tract and composed of 290 acres. The point at which this tract joined Thomas Jr.'s tract on the south end would become the site of the Lower Goose Creek Quaker Meeting House in 1789 (where you will be tomorrow). Thomas then bought another tract. This 200 acre tract was located on the southside of Goose Creek and was bought from Elijah Turner. Also in 1775 John Haile sold his parcel of the Irby tract to John Burden. Although spelled Burden in the records it is suspected that the correct spelling is Borden. John Borden and his wife, Ann, would live there until 1780 when they sold the tract to Nathaniel Manson. Their daughter, Rebecca, would marry Thomas Overstreet's son, William, about 1780.

In 1776 the American Revolution started. This threw everything into an uproar. Land grant processing stopped, leaving Thomas still waiting for his two surveys. At the same time the militia was mustered again. This time Thomas Jr. and his younger brother, John, answered the call. Thomas, Sr., being too old to serve, provided provisions to the Army as did most of his neighbors. It is not known whether William served again or remained at home to help his father.

In 1777 Zachariah Davis sold 204 of the 304 acres of the Irby tract back to Thomas. This tract Thomas retained until after the end of the war. At the conclusion of the war, the king obviously no longer owned the undeeded land. A new setup had to be instituted to process land claims. In addition to the delay caused by this, the veterans from the war were paid by the state with land warrants. The results of this were a flood of land claims. Old surveys did not necessarily produce the grant that they should have. This may have been the case with Thomas Overstreet.

In 1779 Thomas' son, William, bought 350 acres at the head of Glady Branch. He held this tract for two years and it was sold in 1781 to William Leftwich. About this time William (Overstreet) married Rebecca Borden. In 1785 William bought 100 acres on Arvias Creek on the south side of Goose Creek. In about 1780 Thomas' son, Thomas Jr., returned from the war, having taken a wife, Barsheba. Family tradition says that she was a Native American. No record has been located for the marriage. They lived on the parcel of the Irby tract which Thomas Jr. still owned from before the war. Also in 1780 Thomas' son, John, returned from the war. He was unmarried and apparently installed on the 100 acre tract on the western end of the 700 acre land survey, however on 2/1/1780 Benjamin Witt was issued a land grant for 700 acres. This was the same 700 acres that Thomas Overstreet had surveyed in 1773. How this occurred is unsure. Thomas Overstreet's daughter, Mary, first married a Witt, and then Edward Doss. Did Thomas sell his rights to the 700 acres to his son-in-law as he had sold land to the older daughter's husband, John Haile, allowing the grant to come through in Witt's name? Benjamin Witt died before 1791, leaving only an infant son, John.

A chancery suit developed between Thomas Overstreet and John Witt, resulting in the sale of 100 acres at the western end of the 700 acre tract in 1791 to Ennis Mitchell. The sale was from John Witt, guardian for John Witt, the younger, and only son and heir to John Witt, deceased, to Ennis Mitchell. In 1783 Thomas sold the 200 acres he bought from Elijah Turner in 1775 to Admire Turner. He also sold the 100 acres of the 204 acres he bought back from Zachariah Davis to Joseph Wilson. On 11/3/1785 Thomas' only unmarried son, John, married Nancy Dabney, the daughter of Cornelius Dabney. The Dabneys lived on Body Camp Creek just west of the Irby tract. The following year, 1786, saw Thomas buying yet another tract. This time he bought a 337 acre tract on Glady Branch from William Mead. The tract was actually on a western branch of Glady Branch, almost joining the Irby tract on the southern end. This tract he would keep until his death. In 1787 Thomas sold the final parcel from the Irby tract of 100 acres to Thomas Pullen. This then reduced his land holdings to the home tract, on Falling Creek. The 337 acres on Glady Branch which he had just bought and the 240 acre survey on Island Creek awaited patent. The patent was finally issued on 8/8/1787. By this time Thomas and Agnes were approaching 60. All of their children are married, and there were already grandchildren. His home tract was intact, and he had two tracts available for sale if desired.

There were even other Overstreets in the county. Thomas Overstreet, the hatter by profession, had arrived and purchased 125 acres on Big Otter River in 1783. He and his wife, the former Judith Walker, would remain there until 1793 when they would sell all their land and move to Mercer County, Kentucky. A third Overstreet, James Overstreet, from Goochland County, had just moved into the northern part of the county near Suck Mountain. All three of his (Thomas') sons and their children lived nearby. Everything seemed okay with the first Overstreet family, this however was short-lived. For five years later, around New Year's 1792, Thomas Overstreet, Sr. died. He left a will in which he took care of his wife and family. His two sons, Thomas Jr. and John, were named as executors. Within one year the Falling Creek home tract was sold to John L.W. Mayhew. Another year would see the 240 acre land grant divided and sold. The Glady Creek tract would become the home of Thomas Jr., who had sold the Irby parcel in 1787 possibly to return home or move temporarily to the 240 acre grant and run it for his dad. Agnes outlived her husband, but we do not know how long. With her death the curtain closes on the life of this early settler. But life goes on, as we shall see with Thomas Overstreet, Jr.

This concludes Mr. Tinsley's speech, at least the portion pertaining to Thomas, Sr. Even though he had been working on the Overstreets for several years prior, he was unaware of Thomas Overstreet, Jr.'s Revolutionary War pension claim in which he deposed he was born 15 October 1744 in Orange County, Virginia. Someone brought this record to his attention after his speech, which was found in a recently published booklet on Bedford Revolutionary Pension applications.

Although the ancestry of Thomas Overstreet, Sr. of Bedford County, Virginia, who died in 1791, will probably never be proven, the following information was prepared by noted Bedford historian J. Robert ("Bob") Tinsley (1942?-2001) on February 7, 1999, which is conjecture on the origins of the Overstreet families of Bedford and Southside Virginia:

The following is an attempt to place all of the early Overstreets into perspective. Many of the county records in that region of the state were destroyed during the Civil War. Therefore much of what is developed here is speculative. Therefore the rules of common sense must apply. The picture given here makes sense, based on the bits of available information. As new pieces are unearthed, it is subject to modification. This author hopes at the conclusions that have been made will be ultimately found to be at least close to being historically accurate.

James R. Tinsley
February 7, 1999

The colony in Virginia was founded as a business venture. By 1620 over 1000 individuals had been transported to Virginia to tend the farms and projects of the London Company. These were almost exclusively men and unfortunately most of their names have not been documented. Soon women began to appear and families began to appear.

John Overstreet, the first of that name to appear in Virginia, was most likely one of those early individuals. He first appears in the records in York County in 1654. He lived there until he died in 1671. He married Sarah Moore, the daughter of Geoffrey Moore. She already had one child, Edward Jenkins, by a previous marriage and blessed John Overstreet with three children, namely, Geoffrey, Thomas, and Sarah. All three of the children appear to have lived and died in York County. Thomas died about 1692 leaving "children" which included a son named John. Jeffrey died about 1702 leaving sons John, Henry, Thomas, and Edward. The 1704 Quit Rent list showed that a Jeffrey Overstreet owned land in York County as well as a Thomas Overstreet. A John Overstreet died there in 1710 and a Thomas Overstreet in 1720. It is not known whether any of this line of Overstreets survived with male namesakes. A Henry Overstreet moved to Georgia in the early 1700's. He may have been Jeffrey's son but to this date no evidence has surfaced to imply that.

By 1704 another Overstreet had entered the scene. James Overstreet, after making several trips to the colony during the period of 1682 to 1703, had settled in King and Queen County. References to him appear in the Middlesex County records in the early 1690's. By the 1704 Quit Rent list he appears to have obtained 180 acres and 50 acres in King and Queen County. This county is adjacent to Middlesex County on the west and was split lengthwise in 1702 to form King William County. No evidence has been found to link this James Overstreet to the John Overstreet in York County.

The colony at this time (1704) was composed of two counties on the Eastern Shore peninsula and 22 counties on the western side of the Chesapeake Bay. Settlement, however, had barely reached the fall line of the rivers, about fifty or sixty miles inland. The two Overstreet groups lived about thirty or forty miles apart.

At this point it is assumed that both groups were having children. Ignoring the Henry Overstreet who went to Georgia for the moment, only two sons appear to emerge from this time period. One is a John Overstreet and one is a William Overstreet.

It would appear that John Overstreet lived and owned land in King and Queen County. He died prior to 1743, leaving a wife Elizabeth, who took on boarders through at least 1757. The King and Queen County records were destroyed. However, some of the Vestry records survived, from which the above was obtained. It would seem that he inherited the land of James Overstreet, hence implying James to be his father. If he inherited the land, then any brother he may have had would have been landless.

Thus the other Overstreet would have been landless. William Overstreet went southward to Amelia County, which was cut off of Prince George and Brunswick Counties in 1735. This William died in 1757 where the Inventory and Account of his estate appears in the Prince Edward Will Book I. Prince Edward (the western part of Amelia County) was formed in 1754.

This picture of the two "brothers," one in King and Queen and one in Amelia, is supported by the locations of their children, born in the 1720's and 1730's. John Overstreet had probable sons Gabriel (land in King and Queen County) who went to Kentucky, John (went to North Carolina by 1755--Gabriel got the land), Henry (went with his brother to North Carolina by 1755), and Thomas (married Agnes--went to Bedford County by way of Caroline and Orange Counties). None of these families went to Southside Virginia (i.e., Amelia, Nottoway, Prince Edward, Charlotte, or Halifax County).

On the other hand, William became the father of all the southside Overstreets. His sons were James (Amelia---Hanover---Louisa Counties in Virginia---Kentucky), Thomas (Amelia/Nottoway), Richard (Middlesex County; his son went to Charlotte County), and William (Amelia County). Thomas (the hatter), who migrated to Kentucky, appears to be the son of William Overstreet of Amelia County (William son of William). The Walkers were in this area. He married Judith Walker, then moved to Bedford County, then Halifax County, then to Kentucky. There appears to be no connection between the elder William Overstreet and the York County group. Of course there is also no connection between William and the immigrant James Overstreet. Therefore a choice was made. No William was mentioned in Jeffrey Overstreet's will.

Thus, by the mid 1700's, the Overstreet tree had spread out to Georgia, North Carolina, Southside Virginia, and western Virginia.

Previous to 1745 all the Overstreet references are confined to areas north of the James River, mainly in the Middlesex, King and Queen, and King William County vicinity. This changed in 1745.

A land grant for 393 acres was issued to Anne Overstreet on 6 July 1745 (Grant Book 22, page 269). The tract was located between Namozine Creek, the present line between Amelia and Dinwiddie Counties, and Mawhipponock Creek, the next creek downstream on the James River. It was in Prince George County at that time. Dinwiddie County would be formed from Prince George in 1752, seven years later.

Anne is rarely referenced. She was involved in a debt lawsuit with Buchanan and Hill in Amelia County in 1749 with a capias (?) being issued against her on 20 May 1749 and two debts to the same Buchanan and Hill being dismissed on 16 March 1750/51. At that time the year didn't change until spring so by our date this would be 16 March 1751.

A land grant for 137 acres was issued to William Loftis on 10 March 1756 which bordered the Overstreet tract. This grant was on both sides of Mawhipponock Creek. At this time all reference to Anne or this tract cease. The records for Dinwiddie and Prince George have not survived.

We have no reference to the husband of Anne Overstreet. However, the next references may give a clue.

A number of the Amelia County Tithable lists have survived. In 1749 a James Overstreet appears. He remains on the lists through 1756. In 1752 a William Overstreet appears. He remains on the lists through 1752 and 1753. In 1754 the western end of Amelia County was cut off to form a new county called Prince Edward. In 1757 the estate of William Overstreet (dec'd) was inventoried and appraised (Prince Edward Will Book 1, page 12).

On 31 December 1760 a Thomas Overstreet witnessed the deed by which James Overstreet purchased 100 acres on Lazaretto Creek. This tract, now in Nottoway County, was located then in Amelia County. Lazaretto Creek flows southeasterly parallel to present-day U.S. Route 460 between Burkeville and Nottoway Court House. Five months before, James had purchased 200 acres on Allens Creek in Lunenburg County. This tract was located in the northeast corner of present-day Halifax County. It may have been lost since no record can be found of its being sold. This Thomas Overstreet bought a 100 acre tract in Prince Edward County in 1768, sold it in 1776 (eight years later), and bought a 31 acre tract on Peters Creek in Nottoway County, where he lived until his death in 1797.

Assuming that James and Thomas Overstreet were adults in the 1750's, their births would have occurred in the 1720's or early 1730's.

Adding all of this together produces the following assumed family:

William Overstreet (ca. 1700-ca. 1757) married Anne ? (died after 1756)

1. James Overstreet (before 1720-1817), married three times, eventually moved to Jessamine Co., KY

2. Thomas Overstreet (ca. 1730-1797) married Mary ?; lived in Nottoway Co., VA

These three Overstreets were not the only ones to appear in the Southside counties. In 1782 a land grant was issued for 1064 acres on Cub Creek, in present Charlotte County, to one William Overstreet. On 26 July 1790 the same land was granted to John H. Overstreet, "heir at law" of William Overstreet dec'd. John H. Overstreet first appears in the records on 21 March 1777 when he bought 200 acres in Prince Edward County. He lived in Prince Edward County, except for a three year period from 1789 through 1792, his entire life until his death in 1815. Assuming adulthood when he bought the land in 1777, he would have been born before 1756. Therefore his father William would have been born in the 1730's. This makes William another assumed son of the elder William Overstreet and Anne.

There was another William Overstreet in the area. This William Overstreet bought land in the Louse (?) Creek area of Charlotte County in 1781 and lived there until his death in 1823. In his will he mentioned at least four children. Louse Creek is near to Cub Creek but this William is clearly not the father of John H. Overstreet. Per the early Charlotte County personal property tax lists, he was the only tithable Overstreet in Charlotte County. His birthdate, based on backdating the births of his children, occurred in the early 1750's. It would appear that he was not a child or grandchild of William and Anne. To get a hint of his origins we must return to James Overstreet, the son of William and Anne. Where was he prior to the first appearance in 1749?

In the Christ Church Parish records appears a James Overstreet. This James registered the birth of two children, John on 4 April 1741 and Mary on 23 January 1744. This places James in Middlesex County in the years immediately preceding the land grant to Anne.

Examination of the Middlesex County records reveals a Richard Overstreet who died there in late 1774 leaving a will which names four children: Henry, William, Richard, and Mary. The first child, Henry, had his birth recorded in the Christ Church Parish Record on 20 February 1752. This would make him about the same age as James and in the same place. Richard and his wife Jane probably lived and died in Middlesex County. Richard was probably the father of the William Overstreet of Charlotte County.

Adding all of this to the previous data gives the family shown next. William's birth date fits his being a son of James Overstreet, the immigrant. There is nothing that has been found to link William with the earlier York County Overstreets. James, the immigrant, left records in Middlesex County.

James Overstreet

Grant of 460 acres New Kent County to Lewis Waldin and George Martin 22 September 1682 (Grant Book 7, page 192) for the transportation of ten persons including James Overstreet.

Land grant (29 acres south side of Rappahannock River) issued to John Wood for importation of James Overstreet 22 October 1690 (Grant Book 8, page 116).

James Overstreet and John Stone witnesses Morris vs. Lewis 27 May 1695 (Middlesex Order Book 2, page 46-47) and Jno. Overstreet paid. [This is circ*mstantial evidence that Thomas Overstreet, Sr. of Bedford County, believed to be a grandson of James Overstreet, married a Stone (Agnes Stone?)]

Land grant (700 acres Dragon Swamp in King and Queen) issued to William Jones, Jr. for importation of James Overstreet 6 September 1699 (Grant Book 9, page 209).

Land grant (350 acres on north side of Mattaponi River in King and Queen) issued to William Jones for importation of James Overstreet 23 October 1703 (Grant Book 9, page 557).

John and Elizabeth Overstreet

Land of John Overstreet (dec'd) referenced in processioning order in Vestry meeting (King and Queen) 3 August 1743.

Elizabeth to board (keep) Eliza Brown from 5 October 1753 through October 1754--300 pounds of tobacco levied to pay. Vestry meetings 5 October 1753 and 7 October 1754. Vestry Book of Stratton Major Parish, King and Queen County.

This ends the quoted information from Mr. Tinsley's manuscript. The main point of the manuscript was to state his hypotheses regarding the origins of the Overstreet families who settled Bedford County in the 1700's and whether they were related. The Thomas Overstreet who came with his wife Agnes to Bedford around 1755 and settled in the Southside of the county, may be a grandson of the immigrant James Overstreet of King and Queen County, a son of James' hypothetical son John. Most of the Overstreets on the north side of Bedford County descend from James Overstreet (ca. 1749-ca. 1791) who married Frances Eubank Harrison and came to Bedford before 1780. Mr. Tinsley suggested that this James was also descended from James of King and Queen, perhaps a great-grandson, a son of the James Overstreet who was married three times and a grandson of James the Immigrant's son William. Finally, a third Overstreet, known as "Thomas the Hatter" to distinguish him from the other Thomas in Bedford, came to Bedford County in the 1780's but did not remain there long, eventually settling in Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Overstreet Y-DNA tests seem to corroborate most of Bob Tinsley's hypotheses. According to the latest Overstreet direct-male-lineage DNA tests, the Thomas Overstreet family of Bedford's Southside appears to be related to James Overstreet of the Northside (due to a match between a descendant of Thomas and a descendant of Charles Fayette Overstreet, a son of James and Frances Eubank Overstreet). A descendant of William Overstreet of Goochland/Fluvanna Counties (born about 1750) matches the above. Furthermore, Mitchell and Gabriel Overstreet have been placed in the Bedford group because of matching DNA among their descendants. They were in King and Queen County between 1782 and 1787, but Mitchell later settled in Buckner County, Kentucky. According to a descendant, Gabriel Overstreet rented a pew at the Anglican Church of Stratton-Major Parish in King and Queen County. Apparently he stayed in King and Queen and was descended from James Overstreet, and because the Bedford Overstreets match his descendants, it gives credence to Bob Tinsley's theory that Thomas and James Overstreet of Bedford descend from James of King and Queen. However, the DNA tests performed on the descendants of the James Overstreet (ca. 1736-1817) who was married three times and lived in Culpeper County, Virginia, and later in Jessamine County, Kentucky, do not match those of the Thomas Overstreet family, but their DNA does match that of two descendants of Thomas Overstreet "the hatter." This places James (AKA James with Three Wives) and Thomas the Hatter in a separate group from the King and Queen and Bedford Overstreets. It is hoped that further DNA contributions among male Overstreets will enable researchers to revise or draw more conclusions on whether the various families are related and where they originated.

The following are additional notes on Thomas and Agnes Overstreet, taken from the database of Robert Bruce ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, Washington:

Orange County, VA Pg. 160 Inventory of John McKeney, Decd.
John McKeney. Inventory. 9/23/1751. Total valuation L63.11.5 1/2 including money owed by Thomas Overstreet, John Eubanks, Mordecai Hoard, William Huntsman, Henry Franklyn, Edward Coffee and James Berry. Witness: Honorias Powell, Henry Franklyn, Wm. Hensley
###
"Virginia's Colonial Soldiers" by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck. There is a section on Militia Miscelany which mentions a Thomas Overstreet under the command of Lt. Samuel Hairston. No mention of whether it was for service during the French and Indian War or Revolution war. Sharon Fakkema [mailto:[emailprotected]], October 2003, rbo.
###
"ABSTRACTS OF BEDFORD COUNTY VIRGINIA, WILLS BK. 1 W/INVENTORY AND ACCOUNTS, 1788-1803" p.126-128
Thomas Overstreet Inventory and appraisem*nt - Dated 29 Feb, 1792
Negros Jenny, Little Jenny, Sale and her child Bacchus, Davie, Jack, Chole and Lucy.
Listed household goods (no beds or chairs listed), livestock (including 18 cattle), no farm equipment, a "New Wagon" and an "Old Wagon". Included "One sommoth gun", onle old stille, and horses names "Hix" (grey), Jack, Darby, Hudnall (grey).
Appraisers; Francis Hopkins, Henry Hayes, James Edgar. returned, 27 Jan. 1794
###
"ABSTRACTS OF BEDFORD COUNTY VIRGINIA, WILLS BK. 2 W/INVENTORY AND ACCOUNTS, 1788-1803" p.80-81
Thomas Overstreet, senior. dated 17 Dec. 1791
Just debts and funeral charges to be paid.
Unto my loving wife Agness Overstreet all my estate real and personal after paying my just debts during her widowhood. If she should marry she shall relinquish two thirds thereof to my children to be disposed of as shall hereafter be directed and the other third part shall be hers during her natural lufe, then to return to my children as the other. I have given my son Thomas Overstreet a tract of land which he hath disposed of now sold him another. He shall pay up the whole of the price to my estate to be divided with the rest and my executors shall make him a deed to the land when he shall make payment according to agreement. To my son John Overstreet that tract of land whereon he now lives containing 200 acres joining lands of Auston, Fauster and Wigginton, exclusive of his equal part hereafter mentioned.
To my six children (viz) Thomas Overstreet, Ann Hail, William Overstreet, Mary Witt, Elizabeth Keath and John Overstreet all the remainder of my estate real and personal to be equally divided between them as followeth; two thirds thereof at the marriage of my widow if she should marry and the other third at her death or at her death if she should not marry at all.
executors; my sons John Overstreet and Thomas Overstreet, Junior...the occation my son William not being mentioned till the fifth item was on account of his having had land given him before...
witnesses; Joel Lewis, John Overstreet, Thomas Overstreet,
Proven; 27 Feb. 1792 by the oath of John Overstreet and the solemn affirmation of Joel Lewis
executor, Thomas Overstreet, (Note; No reference is made here to John Overstreet as an executor)
securities; William Trigg, John Trigg
bond; 2000 pounds
###
---- WILL of Thomas Overstreet, Sr. ----
Posted by: Cathy PORTER-Maynard (ID *****9734) Date: June 09, 2004 at 13:01:56 of 960.
======================================
~ WILL of Thomas Overstreet, Sr. ~
======================================
Know all men by these Presents that I Thomas Overstreet Sener of the County of Bedford and State of Virginia do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament touching such worthy Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with that is today (Viz)
1st Item the first I order and ordain that all my just Debts and funeral charges be paid by my Executors hereafter named.
2nd Item The second I give and bequeath unto my Loving wife Agness Overstreet all my Estate Real and Personal (___) Lands Negroes Chattles good and after paying my just debts during the time of her widowhood. And if she should marry than she shall relinquish two thirds thereof to my children to be Disposed as shall be hereafter Directed and the other third part shall be hers during the term of her natural life and then to return to my children as the other or if she shall not marry to have the whole to the time of her death.
3rd Item the third whereas I have given to my son Thomas Overstreet a tract of land which he hath disposed of I now sold him another My will is that he shall pay up the whole of the price to my Estate to be divided with the Rest and that my Executors shall make him a Deed to the Land where he shall make payment according to agreement.
4th Item the forth I give and bequeath to my son John Overstreet that tract of land whereon he now lives containing two hundred acres more or less joining to lands of Auston, Fauster and Wiggington exclusive of his equal part hereafter mentioned.
5th Item the fifth I give and bequeath to my six children (VIz) Thomas Overstreet, Ann Hail, William Overstreet, Mary Witt, Elizabeth Heath and John Overstreet all the remainder of my Estate Real and Personal to be equally divided between them as followeth two thirds thereof at the marriage of my widow if she should marry and the other third at her Death or all at her Death if she should not marry at all.
6th Item the sixth I do hereby nominate Constitute and appoint and by these have nominated constituted and appointed my sons John Overstreet and Thomas Overstreet Jr. Executors of this my Last Will and Testament and I do further disannul disallow and denounce all former Wills legacies or testaments by me made done or bequeathed Ratifying and confirming This and this only to be my Last Will and Testament__ In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventeenth day of December in the year of our Lord one Thousand seven hundred and ninely one (1791) the occation my son William not being mentioned till in the fifth Item was on account of his having had land given him before.
Thomas Overstreet
Signed and sealed in the presence of us
Joel Lewis,
John Overstreet,
Thomas Overstreet
----------
Will found in Will Book 1, Bedford Co VA
This is from "Six Generations of Overstreets and Their Allied Families," Beginning 18th Century Virginia to 20th Century Middle Tennessee__Clay, Jackson, Knox and Overton Counties, compiled by Pixy Lynn Overstreet Morgan 5724 W. Del Rio Street, Chandler, Arizona 85226 revised 1995. Some families included: Borden, Butler, Dale, Goodpasture, Green, Holman, Nevins, Sevier, Thurman, Waddell, Williams.

More About Thomas Overstreet:
Burial: probably Bedford Co., VA (location unknown)
Comment 1: It has been claimed in one secondary source that he came to America in 1756 with 2 brothers (Scotch-Irish?) but his son Thomas, Jr. was born in Orange Co., VA in 1744 according to his own deposition in 1833 for his Revolutionary pension application.
Comment 2: Because male-line DNA of one of his descendants matches that of descendants of James Overstreet who settled in the northside of Bedford Co., VA, and a descendant of Gabriel Overstreet of King & Queen Co., VA, Thomas probably originated in King and Queen.
Comment 3: His origins and parents have not been proved. But DNA comparisons among Overstreet families indicate he was probably descended from James Overstreet who settled in King and Queen Co., VA, before the 1680s.
Comment 4: 1749, The name Thomas Overstreet is found in Caroline Co., VA and earlier in York Co., VA
Military: Bet. 1757 - 1758, Virginia Militia soldier; Revolutionary War-public service
Occupation: Farmer; may have owned stills according to family tradition
Probate: 1792, Bedford Co., VA
Property 1: 1755, Purchased 400 acres near the headwaters of the southwestern tributary of the Otter River, later known as Orrix Creek for Benjamin Orric who was one of the first landowners there at Johnson Mountain.
Property 2: 1765, Sold the Orrix Creek farm to John Perry. As the 14, 000 acre Richard Randolph land grant was being sold off, Thomas Overstreet purchased 64 and 136 acres adjoining his 346 acre Orrix Creek farm. He then purchased 235 acres nearby on Falling Creek.
Property 3: 1769, Purchased 350 acres of the 10, 000 acre Archibald Cary land grant on Wolf Creek, ten miles west of Falling Creek. Thomas probably never farmed this property because he sold it to Adam Lynn shortly thereafter.
Property 4: 1772, Purchased 1230 acres from Charles Irby on both sides of the east fork of Difficult Creek. a land grant to Irby issued only a year earlier. In 1772 Thomas sold the southwest portion of his Falling Creek tract to James Robertson.
Property 5: Aft. 1773, Began subdividing and selling off portions of his Irby tract on Difficult Creek. Zachariah Davis and John Haile were among the purchasers, the latter having married Thomas' daughter Nancy Ann. 222 acres of this tract Thomas deeded to Thomas, Jr. May 1773.
Property 6: Abt. 1775, Purchased from Elijah Turner a 200 acre tract on the southside of Goose Creek.
Property 7: 1775, Sold the last remaining parcel of his Irby tract to Isiah Turner, 290 acres adjacent to Thomas, Jr.'s land. Where the tracts adjoined was the later site of Lower Goose Creek Meeting House, founded in 1789.
Property 8: 1777, Thomas Overstreet, Sr. repurchased from Zachariah Davis 204 acres of the 304 acre Irby tract, 100 acres of which he sold again to Joseph Wilson in 1783.
Property 9: 1786, Purchased 337 acres on Glady Branch from William Mead close to the Charles Irby tract. The Glady Branch tract and a 240 acre Island Creek tract received patents on 8 Aug 1787.
Property 10: Abt. 1792, Following his death, his Falling Creek home tract was sold to John Love William Mayhew who later settled in Iredell Co., NC.
Residence 1: Bef. 1755, Orange Co., VA
Residence 2: Aft. 1755, Bedford Co., VA; was on jury to value land there in Mar 1755. He was the first of three Overstreets to appear in Bedford County in the mid-1700's. A James Overstreet settled in the northside, and a Thomas Overstreet "the Hatter" also came through Bedford.
Residence 3: Bet. 1755 - 1765, Lived on the Orrix Creek farm after first settling in Bedford County; land was located south of present-day Route 24 near its bridge over the Otter River.
Residence 4: Aft. 1765, After selling his Orrix Creek farm, Thomas apparently moved to a 776 acre farm on Falling Creek.
Will: 07 Dec 1791, Bedford Co., VA

Notes for Agnes Stone?:
Circ*mstantial evidence Agnes was a daughter of William and Elizaberh Ann Stone:

1. Thomas Overstreet, her husband, purchased land on Orrix Creek, Bedford Co., VA from William Stone

2. Agnes had a son William and a daughter Elizabeth Ann

3. Agnes had a great-great-grandson named William Stone Jourdan, MD (1831-1869)

4. Agnes and Thomas' son Thomas had sons named Jeremiah and Stephen, names not see in their immediate Overstreet and Turner sides, and William Stone had sons with those names.

5. William Stone's brother Nicholas also had a daughter named Agnes

6. The Stone, Overstreet, and Turner families appear to have known one another in Caroline County and nearby areas in Tidewater Virginia, and to have come to Bedford County around the same time and intermarried.

More About Agnes Stone?:
Comment 1: Bob Tinsley suggested her maiden name could have been Stone, a possible daughter of William Stone from whom Thomas Overstreet bought land on Orrix Creek. William Stone also apparently lived in Caroline and/or Orange Co., VA. Agnes had a son William.
Comment 2: There is other circ*mstantial evidence that she was a daughter of William Stone. She had a descendant named William Stone Jourdan, MD through her son William who settled in Tennessee. There is no proof that William Stone had a daughter Agnes.

Children of Thomas Overstreet and Agnes Stone? are:
8 i. Thomas Overstreet, Jr., born 15 Oct 1744 in Orange Co., VA; died 11 Apr 1842 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner Abt. 1775 in probably Bedford Co., VA; married (2) Fanny Roberts 1826.
ii. Nancy Ann Overstreet, born Abt. 1748 in Orange Co., VA?; died in Bedford Co., TN?; married John Haile Abt. 1767 in Bedford Co., VA; born 13 Sep 1743 in Baltimore Co., MD; died Aft. 1810.

Notes for Nancy Ann Overstreet:
The following is quoted from the database of Robert Bruce ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, Washington:

Below is a paragraph from Roots in Virginia by Nathanial Claiborne HALE, Pg. 11, "Richard HALE of Bedford who died in 1784, had the following children: Sarah, who married Elijah HATCHER; John, who married Nancy OVERSTREET; Elizabeth;James; Martha; Richard; Francis; and Powell. They left numerous descendants later locating in Franklin County on the Blackwater and Piggs Rivers, especially John who married Nancy OVERSTREET. She was a daughter of Thomas OVERSTREET, an early resident and Indian fighter during the depredations of the supposedly friendly Cherokees in 1757. Thomas OVERSTREET died February 26, 1792 and left the following children: John, Mary, William, Elizabeth and Nancy the wife of John HALE. John and Nancy (OVERSTREET) HALE, of this line, thus perpetuated among their HALE descendants in Franklin County the given names of Thomas, John, William and Overstreet, as well as Francis, Richard, James and Powell." Warm Regards, Cindy Hale (date unknown)
###

Well, Bob, we differ in several places, don't we? Especially in the number of children!!! :-)
1. First and foremost, I KNOW from documents through the years that the name is spelled "Haile." That comes all the way down to me....from Nicholas I b. Abt. 1628 to me. I have the name spelled that way in documents all the way down to me. (A few did change to "Hale" in TN...)
2. I have always been told that her name was "Nancy Ann" and you have "Ann Nancy." ???? I have no proof either way. I got this from Denzil Mauldin several years ago. He also gave me the list of children. ?????
3. Denzil also says that John Haile was the son of Nicholas Haile III and Ann Long. There are baptismal records that a John Haile, son of Nicholas Haile and Ann Haile, was born Sept. 13, 1743. There were other John Hailes in a similar time frame, but Denzil Mauldin and others feel that John Haile who was a son of Richard Haile was born later than 1743. This is some of their reasoning....

-TAX LIST: Tax list of 1782 Bedford Co VA states info about Richard Haile and son John, BUT, shows that Richard's son John would have been born ca 1761-1766, which is much later than the John Haile who married Nancy Ann Overstreet.
Bedford Co, VA, 1782 tax list..... "Richard Haile, John Haile his sons, Negroes, Bob, Dafney, Prudy, Rachell, Benn, Randoll and Amy. Personal property & tithes- 5 pounds 2 shillings 3 pence, Free whites over 21- 1, slaves, 7, horses-4, cattle-17, White tithes over 16-2, Blacks over 16- 3.
NOTE: John Haile moved from Bedford Co, VA to Bedford Co, TN as did most of the children of Nicholas III and Ann Long. It appears that William Bannister, second husband of Ann, and Ann Long may have lived Bedford Co, TN along with children and families...Nicholas IV and wife Ruth Acre, Mary Hail and husband Matthew Talbot, Ann Hail and husband William Mead, Meshack Hail and wife Sophia, Abednego Hail and wife Johanna Smith, and John Hail and wife Nancy Ann Overstreet. Mead Haile and wife (Betsey and/or Mary) for sure were in Bedford Co, TN. (I have been told this about the others; I need to research it and verify it!)

-CENSUS: In the 1850 TN Census, I found the following children of Nancy
Ann Overstreet and John Haile:
1. Nancy Haile and John Rees. Nancy, 78, b. VA, John Rees, 80, b. VA, Charles Rives 35, Charlotte 35, Nancy 13, Benjamin 11, Adeline 9, Martha 7, Mary 5, John 3. They were living in Lincoln Co (LI-472-65)
2. Mary (?) and Mead Haile. Miade 76, b. VA, Mary 61, b. NC. They were living in Bedford Co, TN (B-73-166).
3. Elizabeth (Betsey) Haile and Charles Dabney. Charles Dabney 89, b. VA, Elizabeth 73, b. VA. They were living in Campbell Co. (C-203-582).
4. Thomas Hale 63, b. VA, Elizabeth 62, b. VA. They were in Lincoln Co (Li-329-258).
QUESTIONABLE FINDS were Nicholas Haile and Sophia Reese, wife of Meshack Haile.
5. Nicholas Haile. Nicholas Hale 57, b. TN, William 23, Priscilla 22, John 20, Theophilus 16, Mary 14, Marcha 19, Nicholas 1. (Sh-1069-301). There is no wife listed.
6. Sophia Reese, 49 (this would make her 10 when she married if age 49 is correct), b. T, George A. 18, Joseph W. 16, John A. Emerson 16, Rhoda Trevillion 15, Olanda B. Rees 9, Margeret J. Gibson 7, Cahterine J. Reese 5, Eliza Brown 19. They were living in Jefferson Co (Je-678-750).
I could NOT find by surname (including if the wife is a widow) the following children: Frances Haile Thorp or William Thorp, Overstreet Haile or Judith Witt Haile (she remarried John Turner: I did not look for her that way), Jinsey Haile but possibly did find Nicholas Haile. I do NOT know the wife's name of Nathan Haile.

-LAND: Fee Book of 1773, p. 170, Bedford Co, VA; John Haile and wife Ann to Ano. Burdon/Burder (sp??) all land in Bedford, VA, Aug. 20, 1775. Land Jno. purchased from Overstreet.

-BAPTISMAL RECORD: Baptismal Record from St Paul's Episcopal Parish, filmed at the Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore Maryland, Register, Vol. 1, pp1-456 1710-1808: The hand recorded Baptism of John Haile, b. Sept 13 1743, son of Nicholas & Ann Haile. Also recorded in same book is the recorded Baptism of his brother, Abednego Haile, b. 12 Aug 1741, son of Nicholas & Ann Haile, as well as other children of theirs.

We have never been able to find a will for Nicholas Haile III. There is no conclusive proof that the John Haile who married Nancy Ann Overstreet is the son of Nicholas III. It is strongly believed that he is.

4. Mead Haile, b. 1774 did NOT spell "Mead" with an "e." I have several legal documents to back this up. He is my g-g-g grandfather.

If you would like to contact Denzil Mauldin, his address is....
Denzil R. Mauldin, P. O. Box 180, Waverly, TN 37185-0180
I hope some of this helps. When you hear back from Denzil, I would appreciate your sending me a copy. I would like to get a copy of his book. It should be out by now. Sincerely, Pat
Via: Kinsey, Pat, email September 2001, rbo.

iii. William Overstreet, born Abt. 1755 in Orange Co., VA or Bedford Co., VA?; died 24 Jun 1829 in Overton Co., TN; married Rebecca Borden May 1781 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1760 in Botetourt Co., VA?; died Aft. 1827 in Overton Co., TN.

Notes for William Overstreet:
The following is quoted from the database of Robert B. Overstreet of Everett, WA:

Virginia Pension Roll of 1835. Report from the Secretary of War in relation to the Pension Establishment of the United States 1835.

WILLIAM OVERSTREET
UNKNOWN
PAPERS BURNT AT WAR OFFICE
PRIVATE
$36.00 ANNUAL ALLOWANCE
$---- AMOUNT RECEIVED
SEPTEMBER 4, 1789 PENSION STARTED
TRANSFERRED TO PENNSYLVANIA

This is being placed here with no assurance that it is the correct William Overstreet.

October 25, 1774 at Point Pleasant, Virginia (now in West Virginia), the first battle of the Revolutionary War was fought. It is known more popularly as Lord Dunmore's War. William Overstreet is listed as serving in Capt. Thomas Buford's Rifleman's company from Bedford County, Virginia.

Later, William is listed as a resident of Bedford County, Virginia who served one day in military service and was owed 5 British pounds payment. On the same page of the listing of monies owed Patriots for time served, William's brothers-in-law, John Keith and John Haill, are also credited with time served. John Keith for ten days was owed fifty pounds and John Haill was owed thirty pounds for six days served. William Overstreet's brother, Thomas, was credited for nine days service and was owed forty-five pounds. William's wife, Rebecca Borden, is the granddaughter of Benjamin Borden and Zeruiah Winter, who are the Bordens of the Great Borden's Tract of Virginia fame. Her parents were John and Anne Borden.

A deposition (aoldb://mail/write/template.htm#_edn1) concerning the children of John and Anne Borden was taken from Thomas Anderson. Mr. Anderson gave the names of six children for Rebecca Borden Overstreet: William, John, Nancy, Aggy, Rebecca, Rhoda. Mr. Anderson said that Nancy married Robert Neeley, Aggy married Jeremiah Rogers, Rebecca married William Sherrill and Rhoda married John Sevier.

Mr. Anderson reported that John Borden left Augusta County, Virginia after the death of his father and then sold his interest in his father's estate to William Russell in 1753. He believed that John Borden's name was also associated with Orange and Rockingham Counties, Virginia. Anderson also reported that by 24 October 1792, John Borden, his wife and children, along with William Overstreet, were residing in Knox County, Tennessee. Another deposition (aoldb://mail/write/templete.htm#_edn2) was taken on 23 Jan 1841 from William Wheeler who was a son-in-law to John and Ann Borden.

He stated that Rebecca Borden, the third daughter of John and Ann Borden the elder, married William Overstreet, but they were both dead. Rebecca and William had six children. William Overstreet lives in Overton County, Tennessee. He reported that he had been informed that John Overstreet was dead (John died in 1834). Aggy Overstreet married Jeremiah Rogers, but at the time of the deposition were both deceased; they did have children, but Mr. Wheeler didn't know how many boys and girls Aggy had. He reported that Nancy Overstreet married Robert Neeley, who is dead, but she was still living in Overton County, Tennessee. In addition, Rebecca Overstreet married William Sherrell, but they were both dead and had left children. And, finally, Roda Overstreet, the sixth and last child, married John Sevier and they were still living in Overton County, Tennessee, at the time of the deposition.

More About William Overstreet:
Burial: Overstreet family plot, Clay Co., TN
Comment: His son William Overstreet, Jr. (1784-1847) married Polly Preston Sevier whose father, John Sevier, was the first Governor of Tennessee.
Military: 1774, Served in the Bedford Militia in the Point Pleasant Campaign as a private in Thomas Buford's company.
Property 1: 1779, Purchased 350 acres at the headwaters of Glady Branch, Bedford Co., VA, which he sold in 1781 to William Leftwich.
Property 2: 1785, Purchased 100 acres on Arvias Creek on the south side of Goose Creek.
Residence: Aft. 1784, Moved from Bedford Co., VA to Tennessee.

More About Rebecca Borden:
Burial: Overstreet family plot, Clay Co., TN

iv. John Overstreet, born 16 Jan 1760 in Bedford Co., VA; died 08 Jul 1848 in Athens, present-day Menard Co., IL; married Nancy Dabney 03 Nov 1785 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1756 in Hanover Co., VA; died Oct 1836 in Athens, Sangamon Co., IL.

Notes for John Overstreet:
http://www.genealogytrails.com/ill/menard/fam/hall/ho_6.html

The Grandfathers
Vol.I, The Hall and Overstreet Families
Carrol Carman Hall, Springfield, IL, 1981

The Revolutionary War Period
Section II
Chapter 6, Page 51
The Overstreet line enters the Hall family with the marriage of John Overstreet's daughters to Hezekiah Hall's sons.

"No d----d traitor can march in a parade with me"

John Overstreet 1760 - 1848
Teen-Ager in the Revolution

The time: somewhere in the early 1840's. The place: Athens, Illinois. The event: a Fourth of July Barbeque. The speaker: John Overstreet - an honored patriot who had been in Washington's Army.

The account of the incident reads as follows: "At a barbeque at Athens, Illinois John Overstreet found a Tory in the ranks, and during the parade, dragged him out of line and administered a sound thrashing to him, remarking, " No d----d traitor can march in a parade with me."

If this story is true, John Overstreet was then an old man - by the time's standards - but rugged and full of fight as ever. Chances are good that he did recognize a local resident, who he had known back in Virginia during Revolutionary times. Those were days of passion and memories remained vivid.

Teen-Ager
Our teen-ager of the Revolution was born 16 Jan 1760. This would make him sixteen years of age in 1776. An old account says that he enlisted at the age of 15. Since he had not reached his sixteenth birthdate at the time of enlistment, this is true.

A typical account of his life written by an admiring descendant say: "he enlisted in the Continental Army at the age of 15 years and served his country for a period of six years, having taken part in the Battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth and served under 'Mad' Anthony Wayne at Stony Point. His service ended at Yorktown."

Another record indicates that he participated in the capture of Trenton. There is no doubt that 'he endured the great hardships at Valley Forge!'

John Speaks
On 16 June 1818 John Overstreet appeared before the Court of Common Pleas, Lawrence County, State of Ohio for the purpose of obtaining the benefits of a law of the United States entitled "An Act to provide for certain persons ingaged in the Land and Naval Services of the United States in the Revolutionary War."

On several occasions the writer has used all or portions of this paper in speaking before various SAR groups in Springfield and Decatur, Illinois.

Here is what John declared under oath: "That he entered the service of the United States as a private soldier sometime in September A.D. 1775, for one year service as an enlisted Soldier in Captain William Campbells company, in the first Virginia Regiment then commanded by Col. Lewis and Lt. Col. Christy, and, that he continued until the 22nd day of September A.D. 1776, at which time he was discharged at Williamsburg in Virginia, as will appeare by his discharge herewith presented -

"That on or about the first of January 1777 he again enlisted as a private soldier for the term of three years in Captain George Lamberts Company, Col. William Davis, regiment, fourteenth Virginia regiment and believes then known by the name of the 'first and fourteenth Virginia Regiment,' and that he continued to discharge his duty, faithfully as a private soldier up to the first day of January, 1780, at which time he was honorably discharged at Philadelphia, he being then detached from said Regiment under his other Captain Nathan Reed, his former Captain (George Lambert) having been previously cashiered for unofficerlike conduct - That his discharge was signed by the said Captain Nathan Reed, and Colonel Webb - and the said John Overstreet further saith, that during the time of service he was in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, + the Regiment being then and there commanded by said Col. Lewis and the said Lambert his captain. That he was at the 'storming of the fort at Stony Point under General Wayne, the company being there commanded by said Lambert. The he was also in the battle of Monmouth, where the same Col. Davis commanded the Regiment and the same Lambert commanded the company. That after receiving his discharge (which discharge he has lost) he volunteered to serve at the Siege of York, at which Siege he remained before enemies lines until the Surrender of Cornwallis. And the said John Overstreet further saith that from his age, and reduced circ*mstance he absolutely needs the assistance of his country for his support."

Resume
In looking over John Overstreet's original application it can be seen that he did indeed have a formidable military record. He was not at Trenton as that battle was fought on Christmas Day, 1776. He was at Valley Forge for that terrible winter.

The Continental Line of which Virginia furnished fifteen regiments during the Revolution was the nearest that the colonists had as regular troops. Virginia, alone of the other colonies furnishing Continental soldiers demanded three-year enlistments. They were the main and central body of Washington's army - the most trusted troops, commanded by those officers Washington considered most experienced in the field and were directly under his leadership.

'Almost to be considered Washington's personal troops were the First Regiment of Virginia Continental Infantry, the regiment of Delaware Continental Infantry, the 3rd Regiment of Virginia Continental Infantry, and the First Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment.'

As for the youth of John Overstreet. A study was made of the average age of the soldiers in the army Washington led in 1776 and the figure was 19 years. Like all statistics it tells only part of the story. To get an average of 19 years, there had to be hundreds who were no more than fourteen, fifteen and sixteen!

John's Pension
Needless to say, John Overstreet got his pension. It began on June 9, 1819 and was dated back to June 6, 1818. His annual allowance was $96.00 and during his lifetime he collected about $3,000. He was 58 years old when it was granted and he lived to be 88. His wife never received one as she passed away twelve years before his own death.

Eight dollars in cash every month was really quite a sum during the period he received it. Most farmers never had that much cash income; nor did many of those dwelling in the villages and cities, as a consequence, in later years, he was never a farm owner or had a regular occupation living in a village or on a farm with his son, Dabney.

In addition to the pension, he received a land grant in Kentucky from Virginia for 100 acres of land (29 Apr 1785; Warrant # 3890) and possibly another such grant from the Federal government to land in Ohio. In both cases, he like many other veterans, sold the land. A private soldier's grant was always 100 acres. John probably never saw his Kentucky land and the Ohio grant may have been a factor in the family's leaving Virginia for Ohio.

John had land. According to the Will of Thomas Overstreet, his father, made in 1791 and proved in 1792, John was living on a 200 acre tract of land that was to be his inheritance. However, this Bedford county land may never have come into his possession as it was tied to the life of his mother, Agness, with the provision that it was hers if she never re-married. Since there were ten children in the family and other complicating factors, the provision in the Will may have become meaningless.

Life
What else do we know about John Overstreet? Surprisingly quite a lot --- Not to long after his war experiences John became a married man. On November 3, 1785 he married Nancy Dabney of Bedford county. The consent to the marriage was given by her father, Cornelius Dabney, and the Surety was her brother, George. John was 25 years of age and Nancy 29. They were older that most couples of their time at marriage. It was Nancy's second marriage!

About this marriage there had been confusion. Questions were raised, who her first husband? Did they have children, etc.

Nancy Dabney was first married to Thomas Lane. In 1783 with the consent of her father and with James Hunt as Security, William Johnson performed the ceremony. That was all that was known.

Just by chance the author discovered some information about Lane. Lane was a Quaker converted to the Baptist faith. He had lived in New York, Virginia and North Carolina. Later, he was in Wayne county, Kentucky and there is trace of him in Hanco*ck county, Illinois in the early 1800s. He was likely an iternant Baptist preacher and his Illinois association was with the Elderville Baptist church in Wythe Township. (He was possibly at Marion, Ill., at an earlier date.) There were Virginia migrants in the area and he was near his own life's end during the Illinois years.

Romance
It is not known if he deserted Nancy or they separated by mutual agreement. The author is inclined to believe that he deserted Nancy and may have been the father of the child known as John Overstreet, Jr. (see chapter on him). Nancy may have refused to go West with Lane, or, as was common on the frontier, a pro-longed absence of the male with no communications, an assumption was made that he was dead by natural or other causes. Lane may have returned to discover Nancy re-married or heard of it through other migrants and decided not to return. A similar incident befell Nancy's son, John Jr.

(This scenario for Nancy's first marriage is disputed by a Lane descendant who forms a theory of a co-incidental occurrence of perhaps two Cornelius Dabney's and of two Nancy Dabney's and of two Thomas Lane's all in Bedford county, Virginia at the time!

Was John, Jr. a child of Thomas Lane? If so, he was always known as John Overstreet. For the purpose of our family history it makes no difference. What matters is that John Overstreet Sr., did marry Nancy Dabney and in so doing, he remained in character - a man who might help a lady out of a bad situation. The Overstreet - Dabney marriage produced four children: John, Jane, Nancy and Dabney. Of great importance to the Grandfathers story is the fact that Jane and Nancy Overstreet married the brothers, Abner and Elisha, sons of Hezekiah Hall. It is from these marriages that the Hall - Overstreet family line descends.

Overstreets
The union of the Overstreets into the Hall family added a new blood line - the Scotch-Irish [probably incorrect]. Actually, they were English who had lived in Ireland and Scotland, but in the American folklore the expression Scotch-Irish developed (with some historical logic) and the name applied to settlers in Western Pennsylvania, Virginia and the Carolinas.

These Englishmen - possibly of earlier German extraction - had been forcibly moved by the English to the three northern counties of Ireland in the development of Protestant Ireland and quickly learned from the Irish how to make and defend stills. When they fell out with the British government (over liquor taxes), great numbers of them migrated to American, settling in western Pennsylvania and other Appalachian areas. Some came by route from Scotland.

The Scotch-Irish frontiersmen would hardly be called a low level people. In fact, they were Washington's favorite troops - such as the First Regiment of Foot of the Continental Army. Quite frankly, the hated the English government!

The Overstreets were intense in their participation in the American Revolution, as exemplified by our Ancestor, John. We find them fighting alongside the Halls in the Indian Wars. They were numbers of them in Bedford county and it is presumed they were related. The name is prominent today in Bedford county.

There is a large list of Overstreets and Dabneys that participated in the Revolution. Nancy had two brothers and John one brother that were soldiers. In addition, John's father as well as Nancy's furnished food and supplies to the forces. These participants will be discussed in the chapter: The Halls-Overstreets and Their Kin in the Revolution.

Life After the War
The immediate post-war years of John Overstreet were spent in Bedford county. He lived on 200 acres of land that were to be his after the death of his father. His family arrived over the period 1785 - 1795, two boys and two girls, not large by the standards of the time. +*+ John along with his brother Thomas, witnessed the Will of their father 17 December 1791 and 25 February the next year, Thomas Overstreet (Sr.) was dead.

From the Will we learn his mother's name was Agness and that there was another brother, William. There were three sisters, all married at the time of the Will: Ann Hail, Mary Witt and Elizabeth Keath. John and Thomas (Jr.) were Executors of the estate. The widow had to relinquish two-thirds of the property should she re-marry. This provision may have actually left little to her family.

It appears that John's brother, Thomas, had already been given a tract of land prior to the making of the Will. John was to receive the 200 acres on which he was then living. If this provision was carried out then John started his adult life with some property. +++

Bedford County
Life in Bedford county went on. On 23 May 1792, Nancy's father, Cornelius Dabney made his Will. Nancy along with her sister, Molly Turner, received five shillings! After all, she was a married woman and perhaps there was a dowry. In his will Cornelius called his farm a 'plantation' - an old Virginian custom. By the end of October the same year, Nancy's father was dead. Her mother's name was Mary.

During this period we can follow John through the taxpayers' list, the 1800 Tax list and the census of 1810. In no instance does he ever show ownership of slaves. In fact, the 1800 list shows that he didn't even own a horse!'

John performed the family duties after the death of his father as he was now head of the group. On January 7, 1793 he signed the marriage bond of his brother-in-law George Dabney. George was marrying Betsey Echols, daughter of Jacob and Betsey Echols, good Bedford county folks of Quaker extraction. John Ayres was the minister. The bond is an item of historical curiosity and is the Overstreet file material. It was for 50#. The statement of the Bond opens with this statement: 'The Clerk of Bedford will please issue the needful to marry George Dabney and Betsy Echol, and Oblige their humble servants.' (George had been Surety for John's marriage to Nancy

Family Affairs
On August 25, 1791 John Overstreet was the Surety for the marriage bond of his sister-in-law Sarah (Sally) Dabney. She was married to Stephen Pratt by the Rev. James Mitchell. Later, in February 1801 he was the Surety for his sister Elisabeth in her marriage to John Richard Keath. The marriage was performed by the Rev. John Ayers (Methodist) who waited nearly a month to make his return to the county clerk. ++++

In the meantime his daughters Nancy and Jane grew up and were in a few years to be married to Elisha and Abner Hall. The Census of 1810 indicates that John was still in Bedford county along with a passel of Overstreets and a few Hall family members. That census revealed that the county ran about 5,000 whies and nearly 2,000 blacks. In March 1811 John witnessed the Will of Hezekiah Hall. This was a neighborly, friendly act. At this date the first Hall-Overstreet marriages had yet to occur. In August, 1811 Elisha and Nancy married. Hezekiah was dead by July in that eventful year.

War of 1812
John Overstreet, the veteran of the Revolutionary was also a soldier in the War of 1812! As told be Frank U. Patterson, a descendant, the story is as follows: 'When the War of 1812 broke out John Overstreet's son-in-law, Elisha Hall, was drafted for service, but on account of sickness was unfitted for duty. Mr. Overstreet said, "I'll take your place, son."* From the official records it is learned that 'John Overstreet served from Cabell county, Virginia. He was a private in Capt. Wm. Parson's Company and Capt. Henry Tabb's Company, Fourth Regiment, Virginia Militia. 'He enlisted Sept. 7, 1814 and was discharged, February 1815. In 1814 John Overstreet was 54 years old. At Springfield, Illinois in the 'Mall of Honor' adjacent the restored Old Illinois State Capitol, Overstreet's name is on a tablet placed there by the Daughters of 1812. He is enlisted as a veteran from Sangamon County. This is because when he first came to Illinois, he was a resident of that county. **

Move West
The Hall and Overstreet families began moving out of Bedford county, Virginia shortly after the death of Hezekiah Hall in 1811. They first moved to the northwest, ending up in Lawrence county, Ohio. A few of them stayed on the Virginia side of the Ohio River in Cabell county. (During the Civil War Cabell county became a part of the state of West Virginia.) These former Bedford county families were in this area for about ten years before going on to Illinois. There appeared to be a mass movement of Virginians into the Northwest territories during this period of time. Other than wanting to be with his family members, Overstreet probably had no good reason for leaving Virginia. It was in Ohio that he became of Revolutionary War pensioner, getting a pension in the first such Act that was for enlisted men (1818). There are some property records in which his name appears for the Ohio stay. The Ohio period in family history will be discussed at length in another section of this text.

Pensioner
John applied for his pension at Galliopolis, Ohio on June 16, 1818. He had no trouble getting it, his service record met all the requirements. Earlier in this chapter the reader noted John's account of his services in the Revolution. Since pensions were to be granted only in case of need, Overstreet had to make an affidavit to that fact. This was done on the ninth day of August, 1820 at the Lawrence county Ohio courthouse. In this 1820 declaration he re-proved his service record and then swore that he had not received any other grants or assistance for his services from the United State government. (There were prevalent land frauds, etc., at this time especially in the Ohio Revolutionary War lands.) No mention was made of the Virginia land warrant nor of one in Ohio; perhaps it was not necessary.

Personal
The 1820 affadavit gives us an intimate glimpse into his personal affairs. After stating that he was a citizen of the U.S. in 1818 and that he was not involved in any deals, he states, 'nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereunto annexed and by me subscribed ---

Schedule
1 Cow & Calf taken in Execution $12.00
2 Sow & 2 shoats 11.00
2 Pots 3.00
4 or 5 old plates 1 dish, 4 or 5 knives & forks 1.50
1 Hoe $0.50 One felling axe $1.50 2.00
1 Hand Axe $1.00 1 drawing knife $0.50 1.50
1 Jointer .50
1 Auger 1 Groze (?) 1.00
$25.50

"And I am indebted above one hundred dollars and have not the means to pay these debts." (Sig). John Overstreet
The affadavit continues: (by added codicil)
"And I the said John Overstreet do furthermore solemnly swear, that my occupation is that of a common laborer, that I have a wife above sixty years of age (actually 64) to support and have no other person in my family, and that from the infirmities of age (he lived another 28 years) and injuries sustained by my sufferings while a soldier I do but little to provide myself and wife with a support from day to day." (Sig.) John Overstreet

According to this confession, John Overstreet was anything but a successful business man and as will be discussed later there is considerable evidence to support this fact. However, it should be remembered that he had raised a family of four and had made it to 1820. In order to get the pension and hold it, he had to prove need, which he is doing quite well.

__ Authors note: During the Revolutionary War, military records were poorly kept, if at all. In order to obtain a pension, the seeker had to obtain witnesses to his service and produce on his own, acceptable records. John Overstreet because of his association with the Continental forces had no trouble. Later, when militiamen were granted pensions the situation was hectic.

He was no worse off than thousands of his age in frontier America. This was not a cash society, but one of barter and trade. Barter in things grown or made and in labor and perhaps the labor of a sixty year old man wasn't worth much. It is also to be kept in mind that he and Nancy were never without shelter as in the cabins of their children where is spite of a family there would always be room for two more. This is the way they had lived in Virginia and the pattern was to continue as they followed the opening frontiers.

Illinois
In the year 1819, John's son John (Rev. John Overstreet) had made an exploratory pilgrimage to the Illinois country. He was perhaps among the first three men to pass near what is now the site of Athens, Illinois in what was to become in 1821, Sangamon county, Illinois. (later Menard county ).

There can be no doubt that he was enthused about the prospects for fame, fortune and a better life in the newly-opened Sanga - ma (Sangamo) country and that he got this information back to his brothers-in-law, Abner and Elisha Hall in the Ohio country as well as to his brother Dabney, then living in Cabell county Virginia.

By 1822 Abner and Jane Overstreet Hall, along with another brother, James Hall, were in what was to become a permanent Hall home the Athens area. Elisha and Nancy Overstreet Hall, with their brood came along later in about 1827. Dabney with his family joined the family group. Again Old John and Nancy Dabney Hall followed their family --- it was to be their last stop - Illinois!

Pension Again!
John had to make sure his pension came along with him. In June, 1827 at the court in Sangamon county, Illinois (Springfield) John Overstreet asked that his pension be transferred to Illinois and "that his reason for removing to the State of Illinois is that he is getting old and infirm and wishes to settle himself among his children who had previously immigrated to the said State of Illinois." Very good reasons, indeed! The pension was transferred to Illinois July 18, 1827.

The census records of 1830 not only show the Halls and the Overstreets now living in Sangamon county, Illinois but a special supplement to the census shows John Overstreet as a Revolutionary War veteran living there.

An 1830 Incident
In 1830 back in Bedford county, Virginia an incident involving John Overstreet took place. He likely never knew about it, but it can be passed on to the later generations.

In January, 1830 Abram (Abraham) Blankenship of Bedford county made application for a pension as a Revolutionary War Veteran. Like the rest of the applicants his records were not in too good an order. So he backed up his application by seeking support of others.

The application reads:
'Thomas Phelps *** of said county declares he heard John Overstreet say Abraham Blakenship was a good Revolutionary solder.'

John Overstreet never gained fame for his accumulation of worldly goods, but his word on other matters was certainly respected. Incidentally, Blankenship got his pension, as did his widow.

A Life Ends
In the October 8th issue of the Sangamon Journal for 1836 the following brief announcement appeared:

Deaths
In Athens, Sangamon County, on Thursday last: Mrs. Overstreet, aged 80, wife of Mr. John Overstreet.

This item was found by the author in March, 1973 as he examined the files of the newspaper which began publication in November, 1831.

With this discovery, facts that had been bothersome to family researchers for many years were established. Where and when did Nancy Dabney Overstreet die? Many erroneous statements about her demise have existed in the records.

Another question settled was her exact age. It was known that she was older than John. That is all. The death notice places her birth in the year 1756 and established the fact that she was four years older than her husband.

There is no information as to her place of burial. Officially in 1836 Athens had no burial ground, but likely the area given to the city by her son-in-law, Abner Hall, in 1843 and known as the West Cemetery was the place.

Record
At this point the writer will break the narrative to review the life of John Overstreet in the years 1818 to 1836 - that is from the time of his first receiving his pension to the death of his wife, Nancy, in 1836. It is reasonably evident that upon receipt of his government pension, Overstreet never made any serious effort at regular employment (he had no trade) nor to farm. His eight dollar a month income was adequate; along with some assistance from family members. He had indeed become a Virginia Gentleman!

An interesting sidelight to his early Illinois years was found in the old Iles General Store Ledger in the Illinois State Historical Library. Iles ran the store at Springfield.

There was a record of thirty-two transactions. Iles ran the store from 1828 to 1831. After 1831, Iles was no longer in business and John may have transferred his purchases to Athens, which by that time had its own stores. Iles was a smart operator and would extend credit to War Pensioners. Overstreet's account was paid up on the last record. We have a good inventory of things he purchased including fripperies for Nancy and the grandchildren. He used considerable amounts of whiskey which at that time sold for 25 cents per half gallon. He was a good 'jug man! ****

New Life
For John Overstreet a new phase of his life began with Nancy's death. He no longer maintained a home. He spent his final years with his children, principally Dabney. In that household the pension money was a real help, Dabney had a large family, mostly girls. He is recorded as living with Dabney in the 1840 census. Again, he is listed among the Revolutionary War pensioners residing in Illinois at that date. At this point in his life, John Overstreet was living the life of an old soldier, a Revolutionary War veteran, an object of curiosity to those of younger generations around him. Here was a man who had been in Washington's Army, in many battles, at Valley Forge and at Yorktown. John was not adverse to playing the role, telling of his experiences and embellishing them no doubt; such as, 'remembering about seeing the bloody foot prints in the snow at Vallegy Forge." (John was in good position to be a hero, Menard county (formed 1839) could only account for seven Revolution veterans in its boundaries --- most of them had been local militiamen back East.)

Local Hero
Family tradition has it that local militia units were reviewed before him and he was in great demand at Fourth of July celebrations.
There is considerable substance to the traditional tales about John Overstreet that survive. From the files of the Sangamo Journal we learn that on Saturday, March 14, 1840 there was a great rally at Springfield and a meeting of those who 'had served under Gen. Wm. H. Harrison, in the later war with Great Britain.' (The War of 1812). It was a political rally boosting the Whig candidate for President.
The last paragraph of the lengthy account of the rally reads as follows: 'The interest of the meeting was greatly increased by the presence of Mr. John Overstreet, a soldier of the times of Washington.'

As John grew older his infirmities caught up with him. 'For many years he was an invalid, but his comrades held him in such esteem that he was carried, in a chair, to the Independence Day celebrations each year until his death.'
Among his descendants he became a legendary character and a number of stories persisted about him in the family circles. One, most commonly repeated, was that he was a large and powerful man and that he 'once met a bear in the woods and having no gun, just grabbed the bear and carried it home.' Such stories must be looked upon with some sceptism as they tend to magnify with the years. It is likely John told the story, re-living his Virginia days and not noting that the bear may have been a cub!

Death
John Overstreet lived on and on. Death finally came to him on July 8, 1848, he was in his eighty-eight year. He had outlived many of his family, his wife, his son John and his sons-in-laws, Elisha and Abner Hall. Few, if any, of his war-time buddies were still left. He was buried in the old West Cemetery at Athens, a burial ground given to the community by Abner Hall, just five years previously. He was buried with military honors. According to the account published in a 1904 county history, 'at death he was the only soldier buried with military honors at Athens, Illinois.'

Nothing could have pleased him more. ******

In Retrospect
Today, his grave is marked by the DAR of Menard county, Illinois, there is both a metal marker and a granite stone. A flag flies on it on Memorial Day and other patriotic holidays. Between observances at rare intervals a family member or a curious stranger makes a pilgrimage to the grave. In addition to the 1812 marker on the 'Mall of Fame' at Springfield, Overstreet's name appears on a placque indicating that he was a Revolutionary War veteran from Sangamon county. His grave, however, is in Menard county, so his name is on the DAR marker, in the county court house at Petersburg, Illinois.
Overstreet died at his son's home in Sangamon county but is buried in Menard county. This situation has been a cause for confusion among various historians in recording facts of his life. Of all the Hall-Overstreet family members, there has been more written about his life than any other family member. Again - it is doubtful that any of this 'hub-bub' would be displeasing to the old veteran. ...

More About John Overstreet:
Burial: West Cemetery, Athens, Fancy Creek Township, Sangamon Co., (now Menard Co.), IL
Comment: At the Mall of Honor adjacent to the restored Old Illinois State Capitol at Springfield, IL, his name appears on a tablet placed by the Daughters of 1812 as a veteran from Sangamon Co., IL .
Event 1: 18 Jun 1818, Applied for a Revolutionary War veterans' pension in Lawrence Co., OH. He later received a pension of eight dollars per month.
Event 2: 14 Mar 1840, According to the "Sangamon Journal, " he attended a rally at Springfield, IL boosting the Whig presidential candidate. Overstreet's presence was noted.
Military 1: Bet. 1776 - 1781, Revolutionary War-Private-1st VA Regiment; was at Yorktown
Military 2: Sep 1775, Enlisted as a Private for one year's service in Captain William Campbell's Company, First Virginia Regiment; discharged at Williamsburg, VA 22 Sep 1776.
Military 3: Jan 1777, Enlisted for three years' service in Captain George Lambert's Company, Colonel William Davis' Regiment, 14th Virginia Regiment; discharged 1 Jan 1780 at Philadelphia, PA; served in battles of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, and Stony Point.
Military 4: Abt. 1781, Volunteered to serve at the Siege of Yorktown, VA; served until Cornwallis' surrender.
Military 5: 1812, Served in War of 1812 from Cabell Co., VA (later WV) when his son-in-law, Elisha Hall, could not serve due to sickness. He served in the Fourth Regiment, Virginia Militia, as a private from Cabell Co., VA.
Occupation: Farmer; apparently had no trade after settling in Illinois and was able to live off his pension.
Personality/Intrst: He was popular as a veteran at 4th of July celebrations in Illinois; enjoyed whiskey; may have had a drinking problem; often called upon to review militia units.
Property: 1792, Inherited 200 acres from his father; moved to Lawrence Co., OH 1811
Residence 1: Bedford Co., VA; Lawrence Co., OH; Athens, Sangamon Co., IL
Residence 2: Bef. 1811, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 3: Abt. 1811, Settled in Lawrence Co., OH
Residence 4: Abt. 1827, Settled in Sangamon Co., IL (that part now in Menard Co.); lived in the newly established town of Athens.
Residence 5: Aft. 1836, Moved in with his son Dabney, in whose home he died.

Notes for Nancy Dabney:
http://www.genealogytrails.com/ill/menard/fam/hall/ho_6.html

The Dabney's
Descendants of the Hall-Overstreet line looking for distinguished ancestors may well find it in the Dabney family. The clue for this statement comes from the Revolutionary War pension application made by George Dabney, Nancy's brother, in 1833. He indicated that until 1772 the family had lived in Hanover county. He also pointed out a relationship of the group to the Shrewsbury family. These facts added to a series of land transactions leading to their ownership of Bedford county land, indicates that they may be considered a FFV - a First Family of Virginia.

With a reasonable degree of certainty it can be established that Nancy's father, Cornelius, c. 1740-1792, was a direct descendant of a Cornelius Dabney, 1630-1694, who was in Virginia in 1649. He came an immigrant from England, learned the Indian tongues and was known as 'the Interpreter.' In 1664 he obtained a great deal of land in York county. In time, members of the family moved westward in Virginia until they reached Bedford county.

Nancy's father was of the fourth generation in Virginia and had in his background distinguished forebeareres, who had fought in the Indians Wars and other of his generation that were prominent in the American Revolution. The Dabney family story is a complicated one, but is star-studded in Virginia history. This history extends down through the years through the Civil War into the present day, where in Virginia the name is still very important. The family inter-locks with many other families prominent in the state's history. It is a family story that is complicated by the attempt to link it with a historic past in England and with the formation of the famous Manakin-Hugenot colony in early Virginia.

Rather than to recount it here, the reader is invited to consult the file on the family in the Illinois State Historical Library containing the author's notes, and to read the section on the Dabney name at the end of this chapter.

More About Nancy Dabney:
Comment: m (1) Thomas Lane

v. Elizabeth Overstreet, born Abt. 1762 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 1850 in Overton Co., TN?; married John Richard Heath.
vi. Mary Overstreet, born in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Benjamin Witt, Jr. Bef. 1774 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1750 in probably Buckingham Co., VA; died Bef. 1783 in Bedford Co., VA; married (2) Edward Doss Aft. 1779.

Notes for Benjamin Witt, Jr.:
The following information was sent as an attachment by Timothy Witt of Huddleston, VA, which he has given me permission to reproduce:

Research of Timothy S. Witt of Bedford County, VA. June 4, 2003

This Bill of Complaint and a Will, indicate the wife of Benjamin Witt Jr. is Mary Overstreet, not Susanna Unknown as many internet files and other writings suggest. Other generally accepted details and my opinions and / or facts follow:

1- Thomas Overstreet Sr. d. abt. 1792 is the father of Mary Overstreet.

2- John Witt d. aft. 1821 is the guardian of John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr.

3- John Witt d. aft. 1821 is a brother of Benjamin Witt Jr.

4- John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr. m. Jane White, Bedford County, Virginia.
17 June 1803.

5- The Will of Thomas Overstreet lists a daughter named Mary Witt.

6- John Witt son of Benjamin Witt Jr. is referred to in this bill as an orphan.
His mother, Mary, was alive at the time of this complaint as indicated in the will of her father. The Will of Thomas Overstreet Sr. was written over two years after this bill was heard. I assume this means in 1789, anyone under 21 years of age is an orphan if their father is dead although their mother is living.

7- John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr. is also referred to as John Witt Jr. in this bill to indicate he is the younger John and his guardian / uncle is the older John.

8- John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr. is an only son.

9- Ja. Steptoe is the Clerk of Bedford County.

This Bill of Complaint indicates Thomas Overstreet Sr. had a daughter who intermarried with Benjamin Witt. Many others and I cannot find a marriage record for Benjamin and Mary.

The Will of Thomas Overstreet- Will Book 2 page 80. Bedford County, VA.
The Will was written 17 Dec 1791 and probated 27 Feb 1792.
His Wife- Agnes, Six children- Thomas, Ann Hail, William, Mary Witt, Elizabeth Keath and John. Executors- John and Thomas Overstreet. Witness- Joel Lewis, John and Thomas Overstreet.

Overstreet vs Witt's Gdn. Order Book 9, page 301. Bedford County, VA.
This Order Book entry has a short synopsis of this Bill of Complaint.
The following documents were filed separately from the Order Book.
These fragile documents have been in storage and have not been seen by the public for a number years.
New Index Number is 1789-011.
Transcribed by Karen O. Glover and Timothy S. Witt.
Words other than transcription are in brackets. Transcription begins here:

[This is the summons for John Witt the Guardian to appear before the court.]

The Commonwealth of Virginia to the Sheriff of Bedford County Greeting: We command you that you summon John Witt Guardian of John Witt orphan & Heir of Benjamin Witt deceased if he be found within Your Bailiwick to appear before the Justices of our Court of our said County at the Court House on the 4th Monday in August next to answer a Bill in Chancery Exhibited against him by Thomas Overstreet & in this he shall in no wise omit under the penalty of One Hundred pounds & have these this writ. Witness Ja. Steptoe Clerk of our said Court at the Court House the 30th day of May 1789 In the 13th year of the Commonwealth.
[signed]Ja. Steptoe

[This is the Bill of Complaint before the court.]

To the worshipful court of Bedford County in Chy sitting humbly complaining showeth unto your wps your orator, Ths. Overstreet that many years ago perhaps 15 or 16 a certain Ben Wit having intermarried with one of your orator's Daughters he gave him the residue of a tract of land in Bedford which your orator had surveyed tho no patent issued at the time and requested a patent to issue in the name of the said Benjamin - that at the same time your orator observed to the said Benjamin that he had previously sold to a certain Enos Mitchell the quantity of one hundred acres more or less part of the said survey & had also sold to a certain Wm Ross the quantity of 100 acres also part of the same survey & to a certain Jno White one hundred acres part of the same tract that agreeable to the request of your orator a patent did issue to the said Benjamin Wit for the whole survey and he by bargain was to convey to the said Mitchell, Ross & White the lands respectively sold to them by your orator but so it is that the said Benja. in a short time after departed this life leaving John Wit his only Son an infant under the age of 21 years & who is still a minor & whom your orator prays by his Guardian particularly appointed for that purpose may be made a party to this his Bill your orator further states that the said Mitchell, Ross & White have not yet got titles respectively to the lands sold to them by your orator the one hundred acres of land sold to the sd Mitchell to begin at Falling Creek adjoining the land of the sd Mitchell Wm Cannaday & the remainder of the survey aforesaid since patented to the sd Benja. Witt & to be divided by a boundry line then run by yr. Orator & the said Enos. your orator further states that it not being in his power to make a title of the said land to the said Enos he instituted a suit in this worshipful court at Com Law and recovered a judgmt for the sum of _____ agt your orator for his default in making the title aforesaid, subject to a release for the same condition that the title in premises be made to the said Enos within ____ months from the date of the judgt [the above blanks were never filled in]
Your orator therefore prays your worships by your decree to compel the said John Witt Jr. by his Guardian Jno Witt to make a title to the said Mitchell, Wm. Ross & Jno White agreeable to the Tenor & Effect of the Contract entered into between your orator & the said Mitchell, Ross & White and also agreeable to the reservation made by your orator at the time of giving the residue of the tract to the said Benja. Witt uness he by making answer to the several allegations in this Bill contained shall show that such was no the contract & reservation - and that such relief be granted to your orator as to Equity & good conscience belongs may it please you wps.
[signed] Hanco*ck

[This is the answer from the court.]

The answer of Jno Witt Guardian of Jno Wit the younger only son & heir of Ben Wit dec'd answereth & saith that to his knowledge the compl. sold to the said Enos Mitchell the said 100 acres of land in the Bill mentioned together with 100 acres of land to Wm Ross & 100 acres to John White and afterwards gave the residue to Benjamin Wit he admit that a patent has issued for the whole 700 acres bearing date 1st Feby. 1780 and has no objection to a Decree being passed for the land aforesaid whenever this wpful. Court shall think proper to decree the same.

Sworn to in Court 26th August [signed] Ja. Steptoe Cl. B.C.

More About Benjamin Witt, Jr.:
Comment: According to Mary Lathan Norton in "Witts in America, " Benjamin and Susanna Witt had an only son John Witt (1777-1864) who married Jane White. However, Overstreet genealogies list Benjamin's son John as John B. Witt who married Elizabeth Bearde.
Event: 1774, Was a signatory of a petition of Peaks of Otter Presbyterian Meeting to the House of Burgesses.
Property: 1780, Patented 700 acres in Bedford County.

18. James Turner, Jr., born Abt. 1729 in New Kent Co. or Caroline Co., VA?; died Abt. 1791 in Franklin Co., VA. He was the son of 36. James Turner and 37. Mary Admire?. He married 19. ? Phelps?.
19. ? Phelps?, died Aft. Apr 1791 in Franklin Co., VA?. She was the daughter of 38. John Phelps.

Notes for James Turner, Jr.:
The following deed was discovered in March, 2002 by Overstreet descendant Gerald Preas of Dallas, Texas in "Abstracts of the Eighteenth Century Deed Books Franklin County, Virginia," Volume I, by Sara Motisher Beck (1978):

Recorded April 4, 1791:
...Legatees of James Turner Dec'd...Eleandor the wife of John Turner, Mary the wife of William Creesy. Bathsheba the wife of Thomas Overstreet, Elizabeth the wife of William Turner, Mary the wife of James Turner and Jeny the wife of Kinsey Coats
Relinquished their Right of Dowre.
Recorded April 4, 1791

Deed Book 2, pp. 208-210, April 4, 1791--Deed
John Turner, William Turner, James Turner, Thomas Overstreet, William Creesy, Elizabeth Hunt, Kinsey Coats, William Turner, as Guardian for Jonas Turner & Thomas Hale as Guardian for Jesse Turner, Admire Turner, Patty Turner & Delilah Turner to Thomas Hale (Franklin Co.) 100 pounds cmv [Current money of Virginia] 150 acres more/less on Pigg River adj. ...on Pigg River...Down the River as it meanders;...Crossing the River; Darby Ryans line; ...Crossing the River; Doggetts old line; Doggetts New line.

The following has been copied and pasted from the website
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~troutt/~troutt/FamilyTrees/OverstreetWilliam.htm,
compiled by Scott Swanson:

***FRANKLIN COUNTY VA***
Thomas Overstreet; probably married -----: ----- Turner,
daughter of James and Martha (-----) Turner
1791 John Turner, William Turner, James Turner, william
Creasy, Thomas Overstreet, William Turner as guardian
for James Turner, Kinsay Coats, and Elizabeth Hunt are
bound to Patty Turner widow of James Turner: "Whereas
the said James Turner deceased died intestate and the
above mentioned Patty Turner widow of the said
deceased having claimed one third part of the estate....",
the guardians are bound to release it to her; witnesses
Stephen Smith, William Mavity, John Hale; 11 January
1790
1791 John Turner, William Turner, James Turner, Thomas
Overstreet, William Creasy, Elizabeth Hunt, Kinsey
Coats, William Turner as guardian of Jonas Turner,
Thomas Hale as guardian for Jesse Turner, Admire
Turner, Patty Turner, Delilah Turner sold Thomas
Hale/Franklin County VA 150 acres on Pigg River;
Thomas Overstreet signed X; 4 April 1791
1796 Thomas Overstreet, Kenzey Coats, James Turner, William
Turner, Jonas Turner, John Turner, William Cresey, and
Elizabeth Hunt were legatees in the accounts of the estate
of James Turner

More About James Turner, Jr.:
Property 1: 1755, James Turner, Jr. purchased from John Eckhols 147 acres on South Fork of Little Otter River, according to Bedford Co., VA Deed Book 1, p. 44.
Property 2: 1764, Purchased from Richard Stith, Attorney-In-Fact, 195 acres on branches of Little Otter River, according to Bedford Co., VA Deed Book 2, p. 407.
Property 3: 18 May 1782, According to Henry Co., VA Deed Book 2, p. 231, Darby and Mary Ryan conveyed to James Turner for 3 pounds 52 acres on both sides of Pigg River, present-day Franklin Co., VA, bounded by Darby Ryan's corner, William Doggett's line, crossing Pigg River.
Property 4: 23 May 1782, According to Henry Co., VA Deed Book 2, p. 215, Thomas and Jane Hale conveyed to James Turner for 150 pounds 297 acres on both sides of Pigg River (present-day Franklin Co., VA) bounded by Thomas Jones' old line and Mavity's.
Property 5: 1783, James and Patty Turner sold James Callaway, Guardian, 147 acres on South Fork of Little Otter River adjoining Aaron Burleson's patent, according to Bedford Co., VA Deed Book 7, p. 227.
Property 6: 1783, James and Patty Turner sold James Callaway, Guardian, 195 acres on branches of Little Otter River adjoining Philips according to Bedford Co., VA Deed Book 7, p. 228.
Property 7: 1784, Joseph Hardy sold James Turner 251 acres on branches of Little Otter River, according to Bedford Co., VA Deed Book 7, p. 275.
Property 8: 1793, A James Turner sold Andrew Donald 251 acres formerly owned by Joseph Hardy on Little Otter River, according to Bedford Co., VA Deed Book 9, p. 195.
Residence: Bedford Co., VA & Franklin Co., VA

More About ? Phelps?:
Comment 1: 2003, Research is underway to determine the wife(wives) of James Turner, Jr. His wife at his death was Martha or Patty, who married James Prunty in 1794 and was listed as Martha Wimmer Turner on her marriage record, daughter of Johannes Wimmer.
Comment 2: James Turner, Jr's wife is listed as Patty Phelps on Internet sites. Perhaps he was married twice and his first wife (Barsheba's mother) was a Phelps, likely since James was listed as a beneficiary in John Phelps' will. Nathan Turner m Agatha Phelps.
Nickname: Patty

Children of James Turner and ? Phelps? are:
i. Mary Turner, married William Creesy.
ii. James Turner III, married (1) Lydia Rentfro 13 Jan 1787 in Franklin Co., VA; married (2) Mary McClary 21 Dec 1790 in Franklin Co., VA.
iii. Jane Turner, married Kinsey Coats 13 Apr 1789 in Franklin Co., VA.

More About Jane Turner:
Nickname: Jenny

iv. John Turner, married Eleanor ?.
v. William Turner, married Elizabeth ?.
vi. Elizabeth Turner, married ? Hunt.
vii. Jonas Turner, married Rebecca McClary 25 Dec 1792 in Franklin Co., VA.
viii. Jesse Turner, married Frances Holligan 05 Jan 1802 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
ix. Admire Turner, married Margaret Garrett 19 Dec 1808.
x. Martha Turner
xi. Delila Turner, married John Thomas 28 Jan 1806.
9 xii. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner, born Abt. 1755 in probably Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1825 in Bedford Co., VA; married Thomas Overstreet, Jr. Abt. 1775 in probably Bedford Co., VA.

22. George Willis, born Bef. 1743; died Bef. 03 Nov 1818 in Bedford Co., VA. He married 23. ? Lucas? in probably Loudoun Co., VA.
23. ? Lucas?, born Abt. 1740.

Notes for George Willis:
Below is the survey of the estate of George Willis, found in Bedford County, Virginia Will Book 5, page 141, typed by Mrs. Helen Mayhew Handley of Berkeley, California:

Nov. 3, 1818. Surveyed for the heirs of George Willis dec'd 218 3/4 acres of land situate in the County of Bedford and lying on the waters of Little Otter divided as follows Lot No. 1 Izra Gordons containing 56 acres beginning at Prestons corner white oak and along his line S 43 1/4 E148 poles to a pile of rocks in Floyds line and along his line S 34 W 73 poles to a red oak thence along the line of Lot No. 2 N 34 W 174 poles to the 1st station.

Lot No. 2 Polly Mahughs [Mayhew's] containing 63 acres beginning at a red oak in Floyds line thence along the lines of Lot No. 1 N 34 W174 poles to Prestons corner white oak thence along the line of No. 3 and 4 S 40 E 184 poles to a Spanish oak and gum in Floyds line and along his line N 36 E 55 poles to the 1st station.

Lot No. 3 Jemima Updikes containing 46 1/4 acres beginning at pointers in the line of Lot No. 2 thence along the line of Lot No. 4 S 47 W95 poles to a Laurelwood in Floyds line and along his line N 39 W 81 1/2 poles to Prestons corner white oak and along his line N 47 E92 poles to pointers thence along the lines of Lot 2 S 40 E 80 poles to the 1st station.

Lot 4 Sally Willis containing 53 1/2 acres beginning at pointers in the lineof Lot No. 2 thence along the line of Lot No. 3 S 47 95 poles to Laurelwood in Floyds line thence along his line N 74 E 43 1/2 poles to Floyds corner white oak and along his line S 39 E 59 poles to Joplings corner white oak along his line N 36 E 58 poles to a Spanish oak and gum thence along the line of Lot No. 2 N 40 W 104 poles to the 1st station.

We the undersigned commissioners informally appointed by the heirs of George Willis deceased to divide and allot the estate real and personal according to equity amongst them all being of full age have proceeded to divide the personal estate of which each party has taken possession of his portion so divided with apparent satisfaction and we have then proceeded to divide and allot the lands of the said George Willis deceased according to our best judgement as to quantity and quality into four equal lots and allocated to the same the four legatees according to the within plat and survey made by Edmund McGeorge under our direction and allotted to each the part named in the annexed Certificate of Surveys by the said McGeorge and the said legatees have each respectively taken possession of the part respectively given under our hands and seals the 4 Nov. 1819.

Stephen Preston
P.M. Goggin
W. Leftwich

We John Gordon and Izra Gordon late Izra Willis Francis Mahew late Polly Willis Samuel Updike and Jemima Updike late Jemima Willis heirs and devizees of George Willis deceased late of Bedford County the said John Gordon in right of his wife Izra the said Francis Mahew in right of his wife Polly and the said Updike in right of his wife Jemima daughters of the said George Willis having informally appointed the within commissioners to divide and allot amongst us the said Izra Polly Jemima and Sally daughters and heirs of the said George Willis deceased all his estate real and personal who have proceeded in manner and form as certified by them do therefore ratify and confirm the proceedings releasing to each other all title which any of us may heretofore have held and it is our wish that this instrument be filed in the Office of the County Court of Bedford County.

Stephen Goggin
P.M. Goggin
George X Mahue

John X Gordon
Izra X Gordon
Francis X Mahew
Polly X Mahew
Samuel Updike
Jemima X Updike
Sarah X Willis

Comments by Bryan Godfrey:

It appears my maternal grandfather, Melvin "Ray" Overstreet, was descended, on both sides, from George Willis three ways. Through his daughter Jemima Willis Updike, George was his great-great-great-grandfather on his mother's side and his great-great-great-great-grandfather on his father's side. Moreover, assuming his daughter Izra or Isabel was the mother of Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet (it is certain that John Gordon was her father and that she was his wife), then George Willis was also my grandfather's great-great-great-great-great-grandfather. Thus, George Willis was his great-great-great-grandfather, great-great-great-great-grandfather, and his great-great-great-great-great-grandfather! This makes my grandfather's ancestry seem very inbred and unbalanced! It is too bad that his origins, wife, and ancestry are unknown, and all that is known is that he lived in Loudoun County, Virginia prior to settling in Bedford, as did the Updikes, Harrises, Mayhews, Gordons, Lansdowns, and other families that his immediate descendants tended to intermarry with.

**********************************************************************************

http://genforum.genealogy.com/va/loudoun/messages/1414.html

These must be the VIRGIN orphans you refer to, from "Apprentices, Bastards, and Poor Children of Loudoun 1757-1850" by Hutchison:

Order Book G, page 502 11 Mar 1783 Thomas VIRGIN, 2 yrs old in Jan 1783, to Andrew CALOR
Order Book H, page 231 13 Apr 1784 Keziah VIRGIN to George WILLIS

There are no VIRGINs on the Loudoun Co. Personal Property Tax Lists 1782-1810, nor the abstracts of the 1758-1781 Loudoun Tithables by the Sparacios.

I do know someone who has researched the Thomas Hunter line in Loudoun, and will send your email address directly to her.

Pat Duncan
[emailprotected]

More About George Willis:
Event: 22 Jun 1772, In Loudoun Order Book E, p. 340, he is listed between Sugar Land Run and Broad Run, nex to Alexander Lucas and Thomas Hunter.
Residence: 1772, Living in Loudoun Co., VA by this time, when he is mentioned in an order book

Children of George Willis and ? Lucas? are:
i. Mary Willis, born Abt. 1761 in Loudoun Co., VA; died 25 Apr 1856 in Bedford Co., VA; married Francis Mayhew in probably Loudoun Co., VA; born May 1766 in Prince Georges Co., MD; died Bef. 1830 in Bedford Co., VA.
11 ii. Isabella Willis, born Abt. 1775 in Loudoun Co., VA; died Aft. 1849 in Bedford Co., VA?; married John Gordon in Loudoun Co., VA?.
iii. Jemima Willis, born Abt. 1775 in Loudoun Co., VA; died 1859 in Bedford Co., VA; married Samuel Updike 24 Apr 1799 in Bedford Co., VA; born 1773 in Loudoun Co., VA; died Dec 1850 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Samuel Updike:
According to an article by his great-great-great-grandson, Kenneth Elwood Crouch (1924-1995), a noted Bedford County historian, Samuel Updike was a shareholder in the Rocky Mount Turnpike. This article is quoted as follows:

Progress made in 1800's with turnpike construction

By Kenneth E. Crouch

It has been 145 years since the dream came for a route that would carry travelers from Lynchburg, across the Roanoke (Staunton) River, to Rocky Mount.

Turnpikes were the idea at that time and in 1847 the Rocky Mount Turnpike Co. was organized to construct what generally today is called the Lynchburg-Rocky Mount Turnpike.

Its origin was at New London. Crossing the Roanoke River was a big project and the final crossing was made at Hales Ford. The ford over the river, which forms the Bedford-Franklin county line, derived its name from Nicholas Hale, Jr., and his son Nicholas Hale III, large landowners in the area.

After reaching Rocky Mount, plans were to extend the route on to Jacksonville (now Floyd) and into Southwest Virginia. The turnpike seems to have ended with the beginning of the Civil War, yet today's roads traverse or go near the original route of the turnpike.

At its organization, Samuel Hale was president of the turnpike company. Dr. John T. Read of Bedford County, Pleasant Preston and Asa Holland succeeded Hale between 1847-1859. The presidents were also regarded as superintendent of the company.

The company also had a board of directors which included Henry David and John T. Davis of Lynchburg, Judge Norborne M. Taliaferro of Franklin County and Harvey Diskins of Floyd County. John W. Dudley of Lynchburg was named treasurer.

Ludwell H. Brown was hired as engineer (surveyor) for the project at a salary of $1000 per year.

When authorized by the General Assembly on March 18, 1847, there were 326 shareholders. Twenty-six were from Floyd County, 11 in Franklin County, 49 in Lynchburg and nine in Bedford County.

In 1850, Edward Saunders of Franklin County was listed as the largest shareholder with 55. The oldest shareholder was Samuel Updike, a 77-year-old Bedford County farmer. Along with his father, Amon Updike, they were the first of the Updike family to settle in Bedford County. Ironically, the turnpike later was built through the area where the Updikes lived on the headwaters of Crab Orchard Creek.

Tollgates were erected every five miles along the route and in 1851-52 there were four listed. The toll-gatherers and amount paid per month were: Gate 1: Thomas W. Woods--$8.33; Gate 2: Thomas Morgan and William Overstreet--$6.25 each; Gate 3: Joseph D. Meador--$6.25 and Gate 4: Benjamin Betz--$6.25. From Jan.--Sept. 1852 the total income reported for all tollgates along the turnpike was $1,475.38.

The road was completed in 1849 at a cost of $11,000. It was estimated to be 32.4 miles long: the width on hills was 17 ft. and on level stretches 19 ft.

The Hales Ford Bridge was 251 ft. long, 23.5 feet above low water surface and cost an estimated $4000 to construct. Another bridge crossed Otter River at Burke's Ford and cost $3,084.02 to build.

The Hales Ford toll bridge was washed away by a flood in 1877. A second covered bridge was erected in 1879 and served the area until 1940 when a steel bridge was erected just downstream.

The first person to cross that new bridge was William Jasper (Jap) Hundley, who lived on the Franklin County side of the river. In 1962, at the age of 80, he was honored to be the first person to cross the new Hales Ford Bridge which spanned the newly-formed Smith Mountain Lake. He died in 1963 and is buried on a knoll just north of the bridge beside Virginia 122.

Numerous routes were mapped for the turnpike as well as segments from Rocky Mount west to Floyd County.

Ludwell Brown's route was a straight line from New London to Rocky Mount. It passed the home of Dr. Daniel Tompkins (1796-1888) of Bedford County. Today, this route would pass by such landmarks as Bethel Baptist Church, Floyd Thomas' store, Bethlehem Baptist Church, Walton's Store and the Isle of Pines subdivision, among others.

Crouch, a retired newspaper writer, has written numerous articles on the history of the Lake area. Several of his articles were included in the Smith Mountain Eagle's 25th anniversary special edition on the Lake published in May 1991.

I, Bryan Godfrey, descend from Samuel Updike two ways and from Samuel's younger brother, William, one way. Samuel was both my great-great-great-great-grandfather (through my great-grandmother Bessie Updike Overstreet) and my great-great-great-great-great-grandfather (through my great-grandfather Herbert Colon Overstreet). Unfortunately I do not know the exact location where Samuel and his brother William lived or where they are buried, but it may be the same Updike family plot at Lone Gum near Huddleston where their father, Amon Updike, and their brother, Daniel Updike, are buried, whose tombstones are still extant. However, the following information, quoted from pages 148-49 of "Greenstone: A History of Southern Bedford County Virginia" by Rachel Parsons Flynn Bishop, provides some clues. It is part of the chapter on the Lone Gum vicinity of Bedford County, the area of Routes 626 and Route 43 (Virginia Byway). Portions of the chapter state:

In 1791, Thomas Woodford bought from William Melton, 211 acres on Little Otter River, adjacent to John Pollard, DB [Deed Book] 8, p. 532.
He later bought land on Goose Creek and by 1829, he owned vast acreage from Glady Branch to Amos Creek. He operated a grist mill. ...

In 1830, James Woodford by council moved the court to erect a mill agreeable to report of jurors. It was moved to a later date on the request of Shepherd and Henry Woodford, whose lands would be flooded, OB [Order Book] 23, p. 17. The mill was built as in a record of 1841, it mentions the mill road running through the Shepherd Woodford property, OB 27, p. 172, Mar 1841, as follows:

On petition of Henry Woodford, it is ordered that Jeffrey Wade, Sam Adams, John B. Witt, and Sam Updike, or any three of them view way for a road starting at Woodford Mill Road and running through Shepherd Woodford and Abner Dobyns, thence to the mill and leaving mill to Daniel B. Stevens, and Adam Newmans thence the line between Newman and Franklin Creasy, thence between William Updike and Polly Crouch to said Woodford Road.

This ends the quoted information from "Greenstone." Apparently Samuel and his brother William, and perhaps Samuel's son William (who married his Uncle William's daughter Elizabeth), all my ancestors, lived in the Lone Gum or Huddleston vicinity. It is known that two of Samuel's children, Sarah Updike Warner (1801-1873) and Samuel Updike, Jr. (1813-1898), lived in the Body Camp section which is several miles northwest of Huddleston, Sarah in the vicinity of Wilson's United Methodist Church on Route 722, where her husband, Jacob Warner, who was about forty years her senior, purchased land around 1800. Sarah, known as Sallie, and Jacob had two daughters, Mary Jane Warner Overstreet (my great-great-great-grandmother) and Elvira Lee Warner Mayhew, who lived a short distance east of Body Camp along present-day Route 24. Mary Jane Warner married Jesse Powers Overstreet, and they had one son and three daughters. Their son, Berry Zone Overstreet, my great-great-grandfather, had nine children, and four of his sons married great-granddaughters of Samuel and Jemima Willis Updike, their second cousins once removed.

Below is a transcription of Samuel's will, transcribed by a descendant, Justin Dallas Crawford:

WILL OF SAMUEL UPDIKE, BEDFORD COUNTY, VA
09 December 1850 Fiduciary Loose Papers, Folder: Wills 1850-1851

In the name of God Amen: I Samuel Updike of the County of Bedford and State of Virginia, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in the following manner, to wit.-
1st I desire that all my just debts and funeral expenses be first paid.
2nd I give to my wife Jemima Updike one half of my household and kitchen furniture, one negro boy George (son of Sal) one fourth part of my stock of cattle, and fifteen acres of land including the dwelling house – all of which is for her lifetime only, and at her death to be equally divided amongst my three sons William, John and Samuel.
3rd I give to my son William Updike one hundred acres of land adjoining the lands of the said William.
4th I give to each of my two daughters Sally Warner and Hannah Updike fifty dollars, to them and their heirs forever.
5th I give to my son John Updike my two tracts of land adjoining each other and adjoining the lands of Abner Dobyns and others, and also twenty dollars in money.
6th I give in trust to my son Samuel Updike for the benefit of my daughter Betsy Shepherd my negro boy Abner, during her life and at her death to be equally divided amongst my four children William Updike, Sally Warner, Hannah Updike and Samuel Updike.
7th I give to my son Samuel Updike my negro woman Mary and all her children and future increase – and the said Samuel to have no more of my estate whatsoever except what is specially given to him in this will.
8th Any part of my estate not specially devised shall be equally divided amongst all my children except Hannah Updike, Betsy Shepherd and Samuel Updike for which three I conceive I have amply provided.
Lastly, I constitute and appoint my son Samuel Updike and my friend Reuben Bond Executors of this my last Will and Testament. Witness my hand and Seal this 9th day of December 1850.

Witness Samuel Updike SEAL
James A Walker
James Field

December 17th 1850
We whose names are hereunto assigned being the widow and heirs of Samuel Updike deceased on hearing ___ the will of the said decedent do hereby certify that we are of the opinion that the same is unjust and should be dissolved and it is our wish that it may be set aside and we therefore ask advice as to the proper manner to proceed to accomplish that purpose.
Jemima Updike
Sally Warner
Hannah Updike
William Updike
John Updike
Thomas Shepherd
Samuel Updike

Note: Front of Will Folder reads: "Updike Samuel's Will 1850 Dec 23rd Will rejected see order"

More About Samuel Updike:
Burial: Unknown, but probably the Amon Updike plot on the Kenneth and Edna Heptinstall farm off Rt. 43 north of Rt. 628, Bedford Co., VA. There are more than 12 unmarked graves in the plot.
Census: 15 Aug 1850, Bedford Co., VA--listed as a farmer, worth $1000.
Comment: Owned stock in the Lynchburg-Rocky Mount Turnpike that passed through his area
Event: Abt. 1777, Said to have learned to walk when his parents migrated from Loudoun to Bedford
Occupation: Farmer
Residence: Loudoun Co., VA as a small child; lived in Bedford Co., VA afterwards

iv. Sarah Willis, born Abt. 1776 in Loudoun Co., VA; died Aft. 1849 in Allen Co., KY; married Reason Lucas Mayhew 20 Nov 1824; born Abt. 1767 in Prince George's Co., MD; died Abt. 1857 in Allen Co., KY.

More About Reason Lucas Mayhew:
Baptism: 06 Dec 1767, Prince George's Co., MD
Burial: Allen Co., KY

24. Benjamin Witt, born Abt. 1712 in Goochland Co., VA?; died Abt. 1774 in Buckingham Co., VA. He was the son of 48. William Witt and 49. ?. He married 25. Marianne Chastain 27 Dec 1731 in Manakintowne, King William Parish, present-day Powhatan Co., VA.
25. Marianne Chastain, born Abt. 1715 in Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement, Goochland (now Powhatan) Co., VA.; died Bef. 1791 in probably Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 50. Dr. Jean Adam Chastain and 51. Mary Ann David?.

Notes for Benjamin Witt:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Witt-777

Biography

Benjamin Witt Sr. was a US Southern Colonist.
Benjamin was born about 1712 in Charles City County, Virginia Colony. He was the son of William Witt and Elizabeth Mildred Daux. He passed away about 1775, likely in Buckingham County, Virginia Colony[1].

In 1715 Benjamin's father, William Witt, moved his family to Henrico County. There Benjamin met and married Mariane Chastain. On 19 March 1732/3 a daughter Mariane was born to Benjamin Witt and his wife in King William Parish, Henrico County. Mariane is believed to be the daughter of Jean Chastain (son of the Huguenot Pierre Chastain) and his wife Charlotte, who were the child's godparents; "Had for godfather Jean Chastaine; for godmothers Ann David and Charlotte Chastaine."[2]

For a time Benjamin lived in or near Manakin Town, Henrico County, but by 1740 he had moved about 20 miles south of his father into the part of Goochland that would become Buckingham County (Albemarle in 1744 and Buckingham in 1761) and he patented land there in 1744.[3]

William Witt, Benjamin's father, died about May 1754. His will was proven in court 13 June 1754. Benjamin is named therein: "In Primis I give and bequeath unto my beloved Son Benjamin Witt a Grey mare a great Bible one Pewter Bason one plate and half of my wearing Cloaths."[4]

By June 1755 Benjamin and his family are living in Prince Edward County. The list of tithables between Bush and Buffalo Rivers, Prince Edward County, taken by Thomas Scott lists Benjamin Witt & his sons Charles Witt & Lewis Witt -- 3 thithables.[5] In 1756 Benjamin purchased land in Prince Edward County with his children Lewis and Charles as witnesses.[6]

Biography per Robert Baird[7]:

Benjamin Witt (c1710? – c1775): The first record of him is the notation in the King William parish register of the birth of a daughter Mariane on 19 March 1732/3 to Benjamin Witt and his wife Mariane[30]. She is believed to be the daughter of Jean Chastain and his wife Charlotte, who were the child's godparents. His other children's births are not recorded there, and it is uncertain where he was living at the time. By 1740 he had moved about 20 miles south of his father into the part of Goochland that would shortly become Buckingham County and he patented land there in 1744[31]. In 1756, as a resident of Buckingham County, he purchased land in Prince Edward County with his children Lewis and Charles as witnesses[32]. He and his sons Lewis and Charles were all on the 1755 tithables list of Prince Edward, though Charles appealed the tax (probably because he was still a resident of Buckingham). His sons Lewis and Charles both appeared as witness to deeds in the next few years, but Benjamin himself seems to have gone back to Buckingham County where he appears in its records. He was alive in mid-1774 when he and Benjamin Jr. appear as tithables, but was dead by late 1775 when his widow and son Benjamin Jr. sold the remainder of the land in Prince Edward County which Benjamin had purchased in 1756[33]. His children included Lewis, Marianne, Benjamin, Charles, John and perhaps other daughters.
Birth
No birth record has been found. Benjamin and his older brother, John, were born in Charles City County before the family moved to Henrico County in 1715. John was born about 1710 and Benjamin about 1712. He would have been about 20 or 21 when he married.

Marriage
In the U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900: Name: Benjamin Witt; Birth Place: VA; Birth Year: 1712; Spouse Name: Marianne Chastain; Spouse Birth Place: VA; Spouse Birth Year: 1717; Marriage Year: 1731; Marriage State: VA.

Death
No death record or burial site has been located so exact date of death is unknown. He was alive in mid-1774 when he and Benjamin Jr. appear as tithables, but was dead by late 1775 when his widow and son Benjamin Jr. sold the remainder of the land in Prince Edward County which Benjamin had purchased in 1756.[8]

Children
From records we know Benjamin Sr. had at least one daughter, Mariane born 1732/3, and at least three sons, Charles, Lewis and Benjamin, Jr. In addition, John Witt is also indicated per the research notes below.

Marianne Witt married (1) ? Brient, (2) ? Franklin.
Lewis Witt married Anne Mills
Charles Witt marriage unknown
Benjamin Witt Jr. married Susanna ? (possibly Leftwich).
John Witt married Eunice Creasey
Research Notes - Son John?
29 Nov, 2019; H.Witt-1888: There are conflicting claims whether Benjamin and Marianne had a son named John (c1756-after 1821). John's birth year of 1756 means he was born 24 years after his sister Marianne (1732), but still within his mother's childbearing years. However, an alternative birth year of c1740 has also been proposed. Around 1778 John married Eunice Creasey, and they had a son John B. (c1779-1864) who married Betsy Beard in 1805. So far I've found no original records to substantiate these dates or relationships, except the marriage of John B. & Betsy Beard. Conversely, I've found nothing to negate the relationships. There is, however, an interesting story which does support this scenario. The story states[9]:

I read on the Woods Family Rootsweb entry 9261 that when my John's father, Benjamin, died in 1789, John went to live with his Uncle John. "Thereafter there were 3 John Witts living under the same roof in Bedford...Benjamin's brother, John (d after 1821) was called "John", his son was called "Buckingham John" and my John (the orphan of Benjamin) was called "Little Johnnie"."
The above scenario works only if #Benjamin Witt Jr. has a brother John. Other sources which support John's existence are Robert Witt[10], Halcyon Days database[11], the research of the late Joe King [12], Robert Baird (above), and Marcia De Sarro-Witt (personal contact).

Huguenot Legend
"It seems likely that the legend of Huguenot ancestors first arose among the descendants of Benjamin Witt, whose wife is thought to have been a granddaughter of the Huguenot Pierre Chastain. Descendants may have confused the background of the Witts and the Chastains. The earliest reference I've found is a statement by Benjamin Witt's great-grandson Rev. Daniel Witt, who wrote in 1860 about his brother Rev. Jesse Witt: 'On the side of his father he was a descendant of a Huguenot family which settled at Manakin Town ferry in the early history of this country.' Meaning, it seems clear, the Chastain family."[13]

King William Parish was formed for the French Protestant refugees at Manakin towne, in Henrico County. After Goochland County was formed from Henrico County in 1728, it served both counties. When in 1749, Cumberland County was formed from Goochland, and Chesterfield County from Henrico, King William Parish went into the new counties only. After Powhatan County was formed from Cumberland County in 1777, the parish served all three counties, Cumberland, Chesterfield and Powhatan.[14]

Sources
Register Containing The Baptisms Made In The Church Of The French Refugees At Mannikin-town In Virginia, In The Parish Of King William, In The Year Of Our Lord, 1721, The 25th March. 82-Done by James Soblett, 83 Clerk.
Registered Lineages Huguenot Ancestors
A brief history of the Huguenots and three family trees: Chastain-Lochridge-Stockton, ... Chastain, James Garvin, 1853-1954. PG267
Documents, chiefly unpublished, relating to the Huguenot ... Brock, R. A. (Robert Alonzo), 1839-1914 PG87
My Virginia kin : comprising the Hamlett, Witt, Giles, Wills, ... Baldridge, Blanche (Hamlett) 1893- PG47-54
HAMILTON COUNTY PIONEERS - THE WITT FAMILY
County Formations in Virginia 1617-1995(Interactive Maps)
? https://genfiles.com/witt/john-witt-c1645-by1715/. Accessed 26 Nov. 2019
? Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia 1707-1770, (Manakin Huguenot Society, reprint 1966), p.?
? Virginia Patent Book 22, p 111. A patent in Book 19, p 188 dated 1 Dec 1740 mentions Benjamin Witt's line in the same area.
? Albermarle County, Virginia, Will Book 2, p 20-21, April 25, 1754, Will proven June 13, 1754 and p 21 Inventory and Appraisal
? Virginia Tax Records from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, the William and Mary College Quarterly, and Tyler's Quarterly. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore: 1983, p 333
? Prince Edward County Order Book, p 86.
? https://genfiles.com/witt/john-witt-c1645-by1715/. Accessed 26 Nov. 2019.
? Prince Edward County Deed Book 5, p 433
? https://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/witt/2808/
? Witt, Robert W. 2006. Descendants of John Witt the Virginia immigrant. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books. Pg. 19.
? http://www.halcyondays.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I2060&tree=Tree1. Accessed 29 Nov. 2019
? https://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/witt/2810/. Accessed 29 Nov. 2019
? John Witt (c1645 – by1715)
? Parishes of Virginia

More About Benjamin Witt:
Census: 1773, Benjamin Witt, his son Benjamin, and Peter Chastain were listed on the Buckingham Co., VA tax list.
Event 1: 25 Apr 1754, Benjamin Witt was named in the will of William Witt as "my beloved son."
Event 2: 1741, Benjamin Witt and Peter Chastain were among those levied to clear a road over the Willis River in Goochland Co., VA.
Property 1: 16 Jul 1744, Patented 200 acres on Hunt Creek, a branch of the Slate River in present-day Buckingham Co., VA.
Property 2: 1756, Purchased 204 acres in Prince Edward Co., VA; deed witnessed by Lewis Witt and Charles Witt, assumed to be his sons. 100 acres of this tract were sold by Benjamin and Mary Witt of Buckingham Co. to Jeremiah Hardwick in 1770.
Property 3: 1775, After his death, his wife Mary Witt and son Benjamin Witt, Jr. disposed of the remaining 104 acres of the Prince Edward tract, relinquishing claim under Last Will of Benjamin Witt, deceased.
Residence 1: Abt. 1744, Moved from Powhatan County 20 miles south into what will become Buckingham County. 200 ac on both sides of Hunts Creek, branch of the Slate River. Land Patents No. 22, 1743-1745 (V.1 &2 p. 1-631.) Reel 20. 26 p 302 Goochland Co. (Adj to Peter Chastain.)
Residence 2: 1755, Appears on tithables for Prince Edward along with his sons Lewis and Charles.

More About Marianne Chastain:
Comment: In her father's will, she was mentioned as Mary Witt, wife of Benjamin Witt.

Children of Benjamin Witt and Marianne Chastain are:
i. Marianne Witt, born 17 Mar 1732; married ? Franklin?.
ii. Charles Witt, born Bef. 1735; died in probably Buckingham Co., VA.
12 iii. Lewis Witt, born Bef. 1735 in present-day Powhatan Co., VA?; died Bef. 28 Feb 1774 in Bedford Co., VA; married Anna Mills Aft. 1755 in Amherst Co., VA?.
iv. John Witt, born Abt. 1740 in Prince Edward Co., VA?; died Aft. 1821 in Bedford Co., VA; married Eunice Creasey?; born Abt. 1750.

Notes for John Witt:
Here is someone that agrees with me that John Buckingham Witt was the son of
John Wittt, who was levy free in 1821.

Little Johnny Witt was the orphan, son of Benjamin Witt junior

Wayne Witt Bates
http://www.witts-end.org

Re: Desire info on John Witt the Orphan of Bedford County, VA ca. 1789
Posted by: Edward Witt, Jr. (ID *****5122)
Date: December 06, 2002 at 13:44:26
In Reply to: Desire info on John Witt the Orphan of Bedford County, VA ca. 1789 by Timothy Witt
2293 of 3223 [Go]

Tim. I think I can help. Wayne Witt Bates helped me untangle this knot. You might also want to consult Witt's End, Vol 1, Issue 3 (Sept, 1998). The problem is repetitive use of the same names by the Witts for generations.

Benjamin Witt Sr (d 1774) and MaryAnne Chastain of Buckingham CoVA had, among others, Benjamin Witt Jr (d 1789), John Witt (d after 1821), Lewis Witt (d 1774) and Charles Witt.

John married Eunice Creasy. They moved to Bedford CoVA in 1778 purchasing 200 acres on Little Otter River. Bedjamin Jr (d 1789), Lewis (d 1774) as well as Benjamin Sr's sisters, Sarah Witt Canady and Agnes Witt Key also settled in Bedford Co. Charles remained in Buckingham.

To the confusing part. Benjamin Jr had a son, John (1777-1864). John(d after 1821)& Eunice had a son in 1779 while they lived in Buckingham known evermore as "Buckingham John" or John B. Witt(1779-1864).

Benjamin Jr. died in 1789 and guardianship of his son passed to his brother John (d after 1821). Therefore there were THREE (3) John Witts living under the same roof in Bedford CoVA circa 1790-1800.

Benjamin's brother, John (d after 1821), was called "John", John's son was called "Buckingham John" and the orphan was called "Little Johnnie".

Little Johnnie married Jane White in 1803. Buckingham John married Betsey Beard in 1805 and Elizabeth Goggin Field in 1830. Both served in the War of 1812.

More About John Witt:
Comment: He is sometimes listed as Lewis Witt's son John.
Event 1: 27 Jun 1791, Was named as heir of Benjamin Witt and Marianne Chastain in Bedford Co., VA Deed Book H-P.
Event 2: 1789, Listed as guardian for his nephew John Witt, son of his brother Benjamin Witt, Jr.
Event 3: 1821, Exempted from paying taxes because he was about 65 years of age.
Property: 09 Apr 1778, Purchased 200 acres on the Little Otter River in Bedford Co., VA, according to Bedford County Deed Book 8, p. 186.

v. Benjamin Witt, Jr., born Abt. 1750 in probably Buckingham Co., VA; died Bef. 1783 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Overstreet Bef. 1774 in Bedford Co., VA; born in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Benjamin Witt, Jr.:
The following information was sent as an attachment by Timothy Witt of Huddleston, VA, which he has given me permission to reproduce:

Research of Timothy S. Witt of Bedford County, VA. June 4, 2003

This Bill of Complaint and a Will, indicate the wife of Benjamin Witt Jr. is Mary Overstreet, not Susanna Unknown as many internet files and other writings suggest. Other generally accepted details and my opinions and / or facts follow:

1- Thomas Overstreet Sr. d. abt. 1792 is the father of Mary Overstreet.

2- John Witt d. aft. 1821 is the guardian of John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr.

3- John Witt d. aft. 1821 is a brother of Benjamin Witt Jr.

4- John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr. m. Jane White, Bedford County, Virginia.
17 June 1803.

5- The Will of Thomas Overstreet lists a daughter named Mary Witt.

6- John Witt son of Benjamin Witt Jr. is referred to in this bill as an orphan.
His mother, Mary, was alive at the time of this complaint as indicated in the will of her father. The Will of Thomas Overstreet Sr. was written over two years after this bill was heard. I assume this means in 1789, anyone under 21 years of age is an orphan if their father is dead although their mother is living.

7- John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr. is also referred to as John Witt Jr. in this bill to indicate he is the younger John and his guardian / uncle is the older John.

8- John Witt, son of Benjamin Witt Jr. is an only son.

9- Ja. Steptoe is the Clerk of Bedford County.

This Bill of Complaint indicates Thomas Overstreet Sr. had a daughter who intermarried with Benjamin Witt. Many others and I cannot find a marriage record for Benjamin and Mary.

The Will of Thomas Overstreet- Will Book 2 page 80. Bedford County, VA.
The Will was written 17 Dec 1791 and probated 27 Feb 1792.
His Wife- Agnes, Six children- Thomas, Ann Hail, William, Mary Witt, Elizabeth Keath and John. Executors- John and Thomas Overstreet. Witness- Joel Lewis, John and Thomas Overstreet.

Overstreet vs Witt's Gdn. Order Book 9, page 301. Bedford County, VA.
This Order Book entry has a short synopsis of this Bill of Complaint.
The following documents were filed separately from the Order Book.
These fragile documents have been in storage and have not been seen by the public for a number years.
New Index Number is 1789-011.
Transcribed by Karen O. Glover and Timothy S. Witt.
Words other than transcription are in brackets. Transcription begins here:

[This is the summons for John Witt the Guardian to appear before the court.]

The Commonwealth of Virginia to the Sheriff of Bedford County Greeting: We command you that you summon John Witt Guardian of John Witt orphan & Heir of Benjamin Witt deceased if he be found within Your Bailiwick to appear before the Justices of our Court of our said County at the Court House on the 4th Monday in August next to answer a Bill in Chancery Exhibited against him by Thomas Overstreet & in this he shall in no wise omit under the penalty of One Hundred pounds & have these this writ. Witness Ja. Steptoe Clerk of our said Court at the Court House the 30th day of May 1789 In the 13th year of the Commonwealth.
[signed]Ja. Steptoe

[This is the Bill of Complaint before the court.]

To the worshipful court of Bedford County in Chy sitting humbly complaining showeth unto your wps your orator, Ths. Overstreet that many years ago perhaps 15 or 16 a certain Ben Wit having intermarried with one of your orator's Daughters he gave him the residue of a tract of land in Bedford which your orator had surveyed tho no patent issued at the time and requested a patent to issue in the name of the said Benjamin - that at the same time your orator observed to the said Benjamin that he had previously sold to a certain Enos Mitchell the quantity of one hundred acres more or less part of the said survey & had also sold to a certain Wm Ross the quantity of 100 acres also part of the same survey & to a certain Jno White one hundred acres part of the same tract that agreeable to the request of your orator a patent did issue to the said Benjamin Wit for the whole survey and he by bargain was to convey to the said Mitchell, Ross & White the lands respectively sold to them by your orator but so it is that the said Benja. in a short time after departed this life leaving John Wit his only Son an infant under the age of 21 years & who is still a minor & whom your orator prays by his Guardian particularly appointed for that purpose may be made a party to this his Bill your orator further states that the said Mitchell, Ross & White have not yet got titles respectively to the lands sold to them by your orator the one hundred acres of land sold to the sd Mitchell to begin at Falling Creek adjoining the land of the sd Mitchell Wm Cannaday & the remainder of the survey aforesaid since patented to the sd Benja. Witt & to be divided by a boundry line then run by yr. Orator & the said Enos. your orator further states that it not being in his power to make a title of the said land to the said Enos he instituted a suit in this worshipful court at Com Law and recovered a judgmt for the sum of _____ agt your orator for his default in making the title aforesaid, subject to a release for the same condition that the title in premises be made to the said Enos within ____ months from the date of the judgt [the above blanks were never filled in]
Your orator therefore prays your worships by your decree to compel the said John Witt Jr. by his Guardian Jno Witt to make a title to the said Mitchell, Wm. Ross & Jno White agreeable to the Tenor & Effect of the Contract entered into between your orator & the said Mitchell, Ross & White and also agreeable to the reservation made by your orator at the time of giving the residue of the tract to the said Benja. Witt uness he by making answer to the several allegations in this Bill contained shall show that such was no the contract & reservation - and that such relief be granted to your orator as to Equity & good conscience belongs may it please you wps.
[signed] Hanco*ck

[This is the answer from the court.]

The answer of Jno Witt Guardian of Jno Wit the younger only son & heir of Ben Wit dec'd answereth & saith that to his knowledge the compl. sold to the said Enos Mitchell the said 100 acres of land in the Bill mentioned together with 100 acres of land to Wm Ross & 100 acres to John White and afterwards gave the residue to Benjamin Wit he admit that a patent has issued for the whole 700 acres bearing date 1st Feby. 1780 and has no objection to a Decree being passed for the land aforesaid whenever this wpful. Court shall think proper to decree the same.

Sworn to in Court 26th August [signed] Ja. Steptoe Cl. B.C.

More About Benjamin Witt, Jr.:
Comment: According to Mary Lathan Norton in "Witts in America, " Benjamin and Susanna Witt had an only son John Witt (1777-1864) who married Jane White. However, Overstreet genealogies list Benjamin's son John as John B. Witt who married Elizabeth Bearde.
Event: 1774, Was a signatory of a petition of Peaks of Otter Presbyterian Meeting to the House of Burgesses.
Property: 1780, Patented 700 acres in Bedford County.

26. William Mills, born Abt. 1699 in Derbyshire, England?; died Aug 1766 in Amherst Co., VA. He married 27. Mary Walton?.
27. Mary Walton?, born in probably England.

Notes for William Mills:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html

Notes for William Mills:
11 Apr 1732 - William Mills patented 400 acres of new land in Goochland Co. on branches of Licking Hole Creek adj Samuel Coleman & Henry Chiles and lines of Scott and Kerby (Cavaliers and Pioneers, vol III p 414 - patent book 14 p 407)

31 Oct 1732 - Henry Chiles and Anne his wife sold to William Mills 300 acres on east side of Licking Hole Creek in Goodland for L25 including plantation called "Bobs" & bounded by Utley's line. Wit: Richard Kearby, Patrick Cash, Edman Hogges. Page 366 Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 1.

12 Mar 1733 - William Mills of Goochland sold Francis Kearby 100 acres for L2.10 being part of 400 acres by patent dated 11 April 1732. Wit: Richard Kearby, Edmond Hogges, William Grimes. Mary wife of William Mills, relinquished dower. Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 1 page 487

circa 17 Feb 1735 William Mills of St. James Parish, Goochland, sold William Chambers 20 acres on Wild Boar Creek for L4, part of a tract bought of Henry Chiles. Mary relinquished dower. Wit: Samuel Coleman, John Clark. Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 2 p 168

circa 15 June 1736 William Mills of St. James Parish, Goochland, sold James Walker 300 acres on branches of Licking Hole Creek for L15.5 part of a greater tract Mills took up by patent 11 April 1732 bounded by Samuel Coleman, Chiles corner, Scott's line, Kerby's line & Henry Chiles. Mary released dower. Wit: John Pryor, Henry Chiles, Peter Patrick, Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 2 page 231

8 Sept 1736 William Mills patented 400 acres in Goochland County on the ridge between Willis River and Great Guinea Creek of the Appamatox River adj. James Allen, John Marten, and William Warnack. Patent Book 17 page 164, reported in Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol IV p 119

16 May 1738 Wm Mills witnessed a deed between John Winn of Herico and Humphrey Parris for land on North side of the James in Goochland along with William & Humphrey Parrish jr. Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 3 page 121

16 Sept 1740 John Parrish sold land on south branch of Owens Creek bounded by William Mills, Henry Adkins and Stephen Lacy

14 Sept 1741 George Hilton sold land on Licking Hole Creek bounded by Thomas Biby, Christian's line and William Mills.

14 Nov 1743 William Mills sold land to Josias Payne Deed Book 4 page 270

15 May 1744 William & Mary Mills sold land to John Robards Deed Book 4 page 356 (This may be when they moved away or were cut off into Albemarle County as he does not appear in the 1744 Vestry book of St. James Northam)

June 1747 - June 1748, sometime in that period William Mills had a 54 acre parcel surveyed in Albemarle (formed 1744)

13 Aug 1752 William Mills and wife Mary sold Martha Massie of New Kent 400 acres on both sides of Pedlar Creek adj Dancing Creek for L200. Albemarle Deed Book 1 page 475

Land patented in 1756 on Buck Creek of Pedlar River in Amherst County is almost on the Bedford border, which fits along with the names. Patent Book 32 p 696

13 Dec 1759 Thomas & Sarah Smith sold land on Pedlar adj Wm Mills, Maple Creek and Edward Watts jr. Arbemarle Deed Book 2 page 205

Will dated 26 Sept 1755, probated 4 Aug 1766, Amherst County Record Book 1 page 73

**********************************************************************

William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse:
Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 2 JUNE 2016 • 1
SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Research Notes
William Mills Family Summary:1
Born: b. ca. 1699, allegedly Derbyshire, England2 (no evidence)
Married: ca. 1721, allegedly Virginia3 or England (no evidence)
Spouse: Mary (Walton?);4 d. bef. July 1776, Amherst Co., Va.5
Occupation: Planter
Died: before 4 August 1766; Amherst Co., Va. (date and place of will probate)6
Residences: Goochland Co., Va. (pre-1749), Albemarle Co., Va. (ca.1749–61); Amherst Co. (cut from
Albemarle, 1761—)
CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND MARY:
1. AMBROSE MILLS, b. ca. 1722; married, ca. 1745, Mourning Stone, and ca. 1759, Ann Brown; lived in
Lunenburg and Bedford Cos., VA (1749–57); Craven Co., SC (ca. 1757), Anson Co., NC (1758); Craven
Co., SC (ca. 1758–67); Tryon and Rutherford Cos., NC (ca. 1768–1780);7 hung 14 October 1780,
1 The compiler has two lines of interest from William and Mary Mills. Through her maternal ancestry, she descends from Sarah Mills and
husband Thomas Watts. Her late husband and children also descend from William Mills, born ca. 1783–88, who married Drusilla Kemp on 24
August 1815 in Franklin County (an offshoot of Bedford County, where William and Mary's children periodically lived). Male-line descendants of
this William-of-Franklin carry Witt Y-DNA. Their closest matches, at 1-step removed on a 67-marker test, are descendants of Lewis Witt and
wife Anne, reputed to be Anne Mills. They also share many autosomal segments with descendants of Ambrose Mills, Sarah (Mills) Watts, Millie
(Mills) Lavender Walton, and Elizabeth (Mills) Learwood Ripley. In Franklin County, this William Mills lived among and associated with offspring
of several of the families discussed in this set of research notes—particularly Callaway and Standifer/Sandefur—whose lands eventually fell into
Franklin after a series of new county formations. For the DNA data, see my ongoing Excel database, "Mills-Lavender-Learwood Matches."
2 For an example of this weidespread assertion, see eelliott1, "Mills Edney Gosnell Durham and Related Families in NC," user-contributed
tree, Ancestry (http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/63883078 /person/1298761813 : accessed 6 June 2015); no proof of birthplace or birth year is
provided here or elsewhere. Many of the online trees cite "U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560–1900" and link to an an "Index-only
record" at Ancestry, taken from a database that Ancestry bought from another provider (Yates Publishing, "U.S. and International Marriage
Records, 1560–1900"); Yates's source is said to be "Source number: 1701.006; Source type: Pedigree chart; Number of Pages: 9," referring back
to another derivative source: an unsupported assertion made on a compilation submitted to a program of the church-based Genealogical
Society of Utah. In short: There is no credible evidence for this alleged birthplace or date.
3 See, for example, "Kimberley Watts Family Tree," Ancestry (http://person.ancestry.com/tree/56168776/person/42360248160/facts :
accessed 16 June 2016). This tree mirrors many others, providing this date and usually (but not always) alleging Augusta Co., Va., as the place of
marriage. Augusta did not exist at the time and it lies considerably beyond the area where this Mills family has been placed. The source cited by
eelliott1 and others is the same Ancestry database, which cites the same pedigree chart. Individuals who cite this source also identify William as
the son of one Gilbert Mills who died in Augusta Co., VA, in 1757 naming a son William and other heirs who are not known to fit anywhere into
the family of William Mills of Southside Virginia. Apparently, these tree-creators are assuming the marriage occurred in Augusta simply because
that is where the erroneously attached Gilbert lived. Much more thorough research needs to be done on William's pre-Albemarle life in order
to accurately identify his origin and parentage.
4 Mary is rampantly asserted to be a Walton, but no known source provides documentation of that.
5 Amherst Co., VA, Order Book 1773–82, for July 1776 term of court summoning Ambrose Mills to administer his mother's estate.
6 Amherst Co., VA, Will Book 1: 73–76 for will, administrator's bond, and inventory.
7 See Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Ambrose Mills, Col. (ca. 1722–1780): Spouses 1. Mourning Stone; 2. Ann Brown: Research Notes," for the
abstracted and/or imaged records that docu-ment this chronology.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 6 JUNE 2016 • 2
SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Bickerstaff's Farm, Rutherford Co., NC, as a Tory colonel.8 His position as eldest son is indicated by a
1776 court order naming him as the "heir at law" of Mary Mills (Widow William), under Virginia's
law of primogeniture.9
2. THOMAS MILLS, b. ca. 1724; m. before 1752; d. before 6 September 1755, leaving children Ambrose
and Elizabeth who are named as heirs in the will Thomas's father's wrote on that date.10 Thomas's
land grant on Pedlar River, confirmed posthumously in 1756, is mentioned as late as 1770, as
adjacent to land being sold by his brother William Mills Jr.11 Thomas's widow may be the otherwise
unidentified Eleonar Mills, who in 1769 co-witnessed a Cabell deed with William Walton,12 the
second husband of Milly (Mills) Lavender. The son Ambrose appears to be the "Ambrose Mills II"
who, in 1808, sold land on Panther Creek of Rutherford Co., NC, to Micajah Pickett, a frequent
associate and neighbor of offspring of this Mills-Watts family in both Rutherford, NC, and Fairfield,
SC.13 The daughter Elizabeth remains a prospect for the mother of William Mills (b. ca. 1783–88,
with Witt Y-DNA) who married Drucilla Kemp in Franklin County, VA, 24 August 1815.14
3. SARAH "SALLY" MILLS, b. ca. 1726;15 m. before 1749, Thomas Watts;16 moved with him to Craven Co.,
SC (later Camden District and then Fairfield, Lancaster, and Kershaw Counties). Died in the Fairfield
area after circa 1795.17
4. WILLIAM MILLS, b. ca. 1728; named as an heir in his father's 1755 will, to receive 330 acres of
"unsettled land." Married Rebecca [–?–], according to undocumented online trees. He appears to
8 J. M. Edney's 1846 biography of his grandfather William Mills. For a typescript, see "Public Member Photos & Scanned Documents,"
Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 23 June 2015), unidentified contributor, "Maj William Mills 1746 to 1834." The contributor calls
the typescript an "obituary written by his grandson J M Edney" without citing a source. However, the transcript itself states that it was written
"October 30, 1845," eleven years after Maj. William's death. It is more probable that this grandson wrote this as a sketch for Lyman C. Draper
who was, at that time, combing the South for information about the men of King's Mountain. Draper's Kings Mountain and Its Heroes: History
of the Battle of King's Mountain, October 7th, 1780 (Cincinnati: Peter G. Thompson, 1881) reports part of this in his brief sketch of Ambrose Mills
on p. 481, but does not identify his sources.
9 Amherst Co., VA, Order Book 1773–82, July 1776 term of court, summoning Ambrose Mils to administer his mother's estate.
10 Thomas's birth-order position in the family is unproved. As a deceased son, he is mentioned last in his father's will. Given that the 1755
will credits him with two children before his death and that males commonly married later than females in their society, I am positioning him
ahead of his sister Sarah. See Will of William Mills, Amherst Co., VA, Will Book 1: 73–76. Thomas's marriage year is estimated, based on the fact
that he had two children by 1755.
11 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 123; Deed Book C: 118.
12 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 115; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 431.
13 "Notes for Micajah Pickett and Kinsanna Hinson," Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy (http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gen
/mn/m331x332.htm#FN1 : accessed 27 June 2015), citing "Rutherford County, North Carolina Deed (Books-page) 25-253."
14 Franklin Co., VA, Marriage Bond 2859.
15 Sarah is the second child named in the will of her father; commonly, but not always, testators did name their children in order.
16 Sarah is named as "Sarah Watts" in her father's 1755 will. As wife of Thomas Watts, on 9 August 1749, she joined him in a sale of land on
Pedlar River, Albemarle (later Amherst) County; see Albemarle Deed Book B 1: 96. For all records found to date for Sarah and Thomas, see
Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Thomas Watts (b. ca.1725; d. ca.1796–1800); Spouse Sarah Mills: Research Notes," 1 June 2016.
17 Sarah's granddaughter Catherine "Caty" (Watts) Hornsby (b. ca. 1769) and her husband Moses Hornsby filed affidavits in Covington Co.,
MS, in November 1821 saying that they had known Caty's Watts grandparents in SC for about 40 years. That affidavit is filed in the Louisiana
succession (probate) file for Sarah and Thomas's son Thomas Watts Jr.; see Ouachita Parish, LA, Succession file A1082 and Succession vols. C:
31–38, "Thomas Watts of S. Carolina," particularly p. 37. The Hornsbys actually moved from Fairfield Co., SC, in 1795; relocating in
Montgomery Co., GA; see Fairfield Co., SC, Deed Book I: 330. However, various documents accumulated for Caty's father attest that the family
visited back and forth from GA to SC thereafter. For all records gathered to date on this grandson of Sarah Mills, see E. S. Mills, "Rev. John
Watts, Esq., (ca. 1749–ca. 1822): Research Notes," report to file, 1 June 2016.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 6 JUNE 2016 • 3
SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
have left VA for NC shortly thereafter—the same time frame that his brother Ambrose left with their
brother-in-law Thomas Watts. William was a resident of NC (county unstated) on 5 June 1770, he
sold the 330 acres he had inherited from his father.18 He appears to be the William Watts referenced
by an 1858 North Carolina history, reporting a tradition that "Mills' Gap, the first wagon road across
the Blue Ridge, took its name from him, as also Mills' River, one of the most beautiful streams of
pure clear water in the world; this river is in Henderson, formerly 'Buncombe'."19 The author assigns
credit to William's nephew of the same name—William of Ambrose, whose grandson the author
worked with in creating the history—but, as other writers have pointed out, the time-frame for
those events is a generation too early for William of Ambrose.20 The misattribution is likely due to
the grandson's conflation of the two Williams in his family history.
Several days before the Battle of King's Mountain, which is notaby connected to Ambrose Mills,
William Mills Jr. was one of several Loyalists captured in Rutherford Co., NC, and was ordered hung
by Lt. Jesse Walton21 (whose brother William Walton Sr. would marry William and Mary's widowed
daughter Millie). William apparently owned land in Rutherford and left offspring in the offshoot
counties of Burke and Buncumbe. Many online trees assert that a daughter, "Mary Walton Mills,"
married James Stepp, by whom she bore a Polly Stepp scalped by Indians in her childhood. This line
remains to be researched.
5. ELIZABETH MILLS, b. ca. 1730; m. (1) Thomas Learwood; (2) John Ripley. Her first marriage occurred,
likely in Albemarle Co., VA, before her father's 1755 will which names her as "Elizabeth Learwood."
In 1756, Learwood and one James Wheeler were sued in adjacent Bedford County, by Archibald
Buchanan and John Brown & Co.; judgment was rendered against them.22 In 1757, she and
Learwood, as residents of Prince Edward Co., sold that Bedford Co. grant at the headwaters of Reedy
Creek.23 In 1760, in his last known document, Thomas was granted another 230 acres in Bedford on
west side of Elk Creek.24 In 1762, in Prince Edward, Elizabeth bore a son who fought in the
18 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 123; citing Deed Book C: 118.
19 Daniel K. Bennett, Chronology of North Carolina, Showing When the Most Remarkable Events Connected with Her History Took Place, from
the Year 1584 to the Present Time, with Explanatory Notes (New York, James M. Edney, 1858), 19–25; digital copy, Archives.org
(http://www.archive.org/stream/chronologyofnort00be/chronologyofnort00be_djvu.txt : accessed 6 June 2015).
20 For example see Jennie Jones Giles, "William Mills," posted at "Private Member Stories," Ancestry (http://trees.ancestry
.com/tree/9120625/person/-849620996/story/3e452001-b9c7-4159-b301-b0b5fc94ac1d?src=search : accessed 16 June 2015), "William Mills,"
posted by "jenniekz" on 23 June 2013. The poster writes: "[This] information is written by Jennie Jones Giles for a booklet related to the Edney
and Mills families in Henderson County, N.C. Much of this information is also available on the web site, hendersonheritage.com. Information on
the web site is an ongoing process on the history and heritage of Henderson County, as part of the classes taught by Jennie Jones Giles at Blue
Ridge Community College. Please note the source when copying information from the web site or as part of this post."
21 William Walton (Private Capt. John Loving's Co., Stevens' Regt., VA), no. S17184 in "Revolutionary War Pensions," Fold3
(https://www.fold3.com/image/25255701 and 33 subsequent numbers), particularly 20447300, 20447303, 20447306, 20447308. This William
Walton was son of the man Millie Mills married.
22 TLC Genealogy, Bedford County, Virginia, Order Book 1, 1754–1761 (Miami Beach, FL: TLC Genealogy, 2000), 87.
23 Bedford Co. Deed Book 1: 139–41. TLC Genealogy, Bedford County, Virginia, Order Book 1, 1754–1761 (Miami Beach, FL: TLC Genealogy,
2000), 134. Despite repeated, explicit and direct evidence of Learwood's given name, many garbled trees online allege that she married John
Edmond Learwood (1720–1855) in 1745, had four children—all born 1745–50, though he is said to have died in 1755—and that she d. 1767 in
VA. See, for example Ralph Tennant, "Christine Larwood Family Tree," Ancestry (http://trees.ancestry.com/tree /21647526/person
/1171920273 : accessed 6 June 2015); no evidence provided
24 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl
?first=799&last=&g_p=P33&collection=LO Patent: downloaded 20 May 2016), "Learwood, Thomas, grantee … Bedford County … 230 acres on
west side of Elk Creek"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761 (v.1, 2, 3 & 4 p.1-1095), p.799 (Reel 31-32)."
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Revolution under the name John Mills alias Ripley (the latter being a name he said he used in
childhood because it was his stepfather's name). Before 1769, she married John Ripley, with whom
she moved to Old Ninety-Six District, SC (modern Laurens) where her son "John Mills alias Ripley"
enlisted at age 14.25 In Ninety Six, before 1772, the Ripleys purchased part of James Ryan's patent
on Beaver Dam Swamp of Little River, adjoining James Harvey—a tract that John and Elizabeth sold
(in full or part) on 6 October 1784.26 In the same month of John and Elizabeth's sale, Elizabeth's son
Edmond Learwood obtained a patent to 600 on "Beaver Dam or Mill Creek," adjacent to "Mrs.
Harvey"27 and, in January 1785, he sold 100 acres (location not stated) bounded by James Ryan.28
After the sale of their Laurens land, the Ripleys moved to a more-western part of Ninety Six (the
new Edgefield District) where the 1790 census credits the John Ripley household with 2 white males
over 16, 2 white males under 16, 4 females, and 7 slaves.29 The second adult male in the household
would seem to be Ambrose Ripley who does not appear as a census head-of-household until 1800
but executed three documents there in November–December 1793; he (a) witnessed a deed for
land on "Beaverdam a branch of Turkey Creek of Savannah River";30 (b) sold a slave named Cain for
50£ to William Harden31; and (c) eighteen days after the sale, paid 60£ for 206 acres on Cyder Creek
(a branch of Turkey Creek).32
Neither John Ripley nor Elizabeth (Mills) Learwood Ripley has been found in Edgefield past that
point. It is possible that Ambrose Ripley's flurry of activity in 1793 represents an inheritance or
(more likely) an advance on his inheritance. At the next session of court after Ambrose's sale of a
slave and purchase of land, a suit against "Jno Riply & Others" by Gabl. Ragsdale was "dismissed"
25 John Mills alias Ripley (priv., Capt. Rogers? Co., Genl. Hampton's Regt., SC), S9025, opened 2 April 1834, Athens, Ohio; file imaged in
"Revolutionary War Pensions," Fold3 (https://www.fold3.com/image/25853045 and 19 subsequent numbers). In his affidavits, John states that
he was born in Prince Edward Co., VA, in 1762 and he specifically identifies his stepfather as John Ripley. He references his mother without
naming her. A witness, Mary Graden, speaks of his visiting his mother there in Ninety Six during his term of service. Mills alias Ripley stated that
after the war he continued to reside in SC for "six or seven years," then removed "into Tennessee, thence into North Carolina, thence into
Western Virginia, and thence into Ohio where he now resides and has resided about 9 years."
26 Sara M. Nash, Abstracts of Early Records of Laurens County, South Carolina, 1785–1820 (Fountain Inn, SC, 1992), 6; citing Deed Book A:
208. Also, South Carolina Department of Archives & History, database (http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov : accesssed 18 May 2016), "Winn,
Richard, plat for 150 acres on Bever Dam Creek, Ninety Six District, Surveyed by Jonathan Downs on July 8, 1772; Names indexed [neighbors],
Harvey, James; Ripley, John," citing State Plat Books (Charleston Series), S213190, volume 0010, page 00182, item 0000.
27 South Carolina Department of Archives & History, database (http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov : accessed 18 May 2016), "Learwood,
Edmond, Plat for 500 acres on Beaverdam Creek, Ninety Six District, surveyed by Jonathan Downs"; citing State Plat Books (Charleston Series),
S213190, vol. 0001, page 00291, item 000. In 1817 "Edmond Learwood Sr." sold 200 acres of this patent on "both sides of Beaverdam Cr of
Little R" to Wm. Moore, citing one adjacent neighbor as "heirs of Thos. Learwood." See Sara M. Nash, Abstracts of Early Records of Laurens
County, South Carolina, 1785–1820 (Foutain Inn, SC, 1992), 385; citing Deed Book K:206.
28 Sara M. Nash, Abstracts of Early Records of Laurens County, South Carolina, 1785–1820 (Fountain Inn, SC, 1992), 6; citing Deed Book A: 46.
29 1790 U.S. census, Edgefield Dist., SC, p. 513, col. 1, line 8. Elizabeth's nephew, Charles Lavender, had also settled in Edgefield; see the
1790 census, p. 509.
30 GeLee Corley Hendrix, Edgefield County, South Carolina: Abstracts of Deed Books 1–12, 1786–1796 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press,
1993), 128; citing Deed Book 9: 72–75. While Beaver Dam of Turkey Creek (Edgefield) is not the same as Beaver Dam of Little River (Laurens),
the repetition of site names reflect a common pattern of this era: choosing land on the basis of geographic features one is experienced with.
31 GeLee Corley Hendrix, Edgefield County, South Carolina: Abstracts of Deed Books 1–12, 1786–1796 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press,
1993), 161; citing Deed Book 10: 347–48.
32 GeLee Corley Hendrix, Edgefield County, South Carolina: Abstracts of Deed Books 1–12, 1786–1796 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press,
1993), 127; citing Deed Book 9: 50–57.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
without a recorded explanation.33 The death of the plaintiff or the plaintiff's removal to another
state would be a common cause. No estate file has been found in Edgefield for Ripley, suggesting
that he died elsewhere—or else he died without debts and his family divided the property amicably
among themselves without the expense of probate.
As clues to pursue:
• A rare appearance of the name John Ripley is subsequently found (23 October 1802) amid a list
of letters in the Nashville, TN, post office.34
• Various Learwood compilations allege that:
o Elizabeth's offspring in Laurens District, SC, included not only son Edmund but a grandson
Edmond Franklin Learwood, born 1782 in Laurens, who named sons Ambrose Ripley
Learwood and Charles Lavender Learwood.35
o Her daughter Mary Learwood married Richard Tankersley Jr. of Amherst;36 several records
abstracted in this set of research notes suggest that the possibility is viable.
o Her daughter Anne Larwood [sic] married Charles Denny or Denney (b. 1760) in Albemarle.37
My limited efforts to verify details of the Denny descent have not yet been successful.38
o Elizabeth's children by Ripley are variously said to be39 John (m. "Ambrose" Graden),40
Pleasant (m. Shadwick)41, Elizabeth (m. John Murray), Mildred (m. "Equiviler" Yearns),42 and
another son who married a Dalsbarthe and/or Barrentine.43
33 Brent H. Holcomb, Edgefield County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1755–1795 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1979),
154, citing 13 October 1794 term of court. The minutes from 1790 until October 1794 are missing.
34 See Sherida K. Eddlemon, Genealogical Abstracts from Tennessee Newspapers, 1791–1808 (Bowie, MD: Heritage Books: 1988), 41.
35 James Larwood, "Morphology of Larwood Genealogy," (MS 1933), 19 pp.; imaged as "Morphology of Larwood Genealogy …," Ancestry
(http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=genealogy-glh47066928&h=6&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt), from a copy deposited in Sutro Branch
of San Francisco Public Library, California State Library System. This skeletal compilation provides no evidence for any of its data.
36 James Larwood, "Morphology of Larwood Genealogy" (MS, n.p., 1933).
37 Joey67, "Denney Family," Missouri Family Trees (http://missourifamilytrees.blogspot.com/2010/03/denney-family.html : accessed 23 May
2016. Ann Larwood Denny is said to be the mother of Benjain Denney (b. about 1780 in Virginia; died January 1842 in Pulaski, Mo.; and Charles
Denney Jr. who died 1841 in Pulaski. Charles Denney's parents are said to be Samuel Denney and Sarah Suddarth, whose parents were William
Suddarth and Parlow Mills. No sources are cited.
38 See E. S. Mills, "Mills: Literature Survey of Southside Virginia: Brunswick, Goochland, and Counties Cut from Them—Principally Albemarle,
Amherst, Cumberland, Bedford, and Prince Edward," report to file, 28 May 2016.
39 Most accounts who aupply a source ae taking their assertions from James Larwood, "Morphology of Larwood Genealogy."
40 This John, by his own testimony, was a stepson of Ripley who used his stepfather's surname as a teen when he enlisted in the
Revolutionary War but then used his mother's surname as an adult. See John Mills alias Ripley (priv., Capt. Rogers? Co., Genl. Hampton's Regt.,
SC), S9025, opened 2 April 1834, Athens, Ohio; file imaged in "Revolutionary War Pensions," Fold3 (https://www.fold3.com/image/25853045
and 19 subsequent numbers). One of his witnesses was Mary Graden who said she knew him at the time he enlisted. The alleged marriage of
John to an Ambrose Graden (a male name) would seem to be an error. The source may have intended to say that John married [Female]
Graden, while a sister married Ambrose Graden. That possibility should be at least investigated.
41 In 1830, one Pleasant Ripley was in Rhea Co., TN. See 1830 U.S. Census, Rhea Co., TN, p. 355.
42 This man appears to be Aquilla Yearns, a Kentucky soldier in the War of 1812, "Killed October 1, 1814." On "Roll of Captain David Holt's
Company, Kentucky Infantry.42 See Kentucky Adjutant General's Office, Kentucky Soldiers of the War of 1812: With an Added Index (1891;
reprint, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1969), 352.
43 Barrentines/Barrontines are found in Edgefield simultaneously with the Ripleys. No Dalsbarthes or similar spelling have been located
anywhere.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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The TN to NC to KY migration reported by John Mills alias Ripley in his pension application suggests
a path of migration for Elizabeth and John Ripley also—as well as a line of Ripleys that has not yet
been attached and may represent the unidentified son, above:44
• Ambrose Ripley born 1800–2 in Tennessee or North Carolina; married 1820 in Madison County,
AL. He migrated to Titus County, TX, 1837, where his wife and seven children were massacred in
1841. Only two daughters survived. In 1859, when he petitioned the state legislature for
financial compensation, one Thomas L. Ripley filed an affidavit on his behalf. Children of his first
marriage are unknown. By his second wife, he had only one son whom he named John.45
• James C. Ripley, allegedly born in Kentucky about 1795; lived 1850 in Benton County, AL, with
sons (a) Ambrose born about 1833 in Tennessee; and (b) Thomas C. born 1840 in Alabama.
Ambrose moved to Titus County, TX, by 1860 also. The names of James C.'s other sons—Francis
Marion and Newton—suggest roots in Revolutionary-era SC.46
• The name Thomas C. Ripley, given by James to a son, is earlier found in 1830 Greene County,
TN, whose 1810 and 1820 censuses are destroyed. That Thomas C., b. 1800–10, appears in 1830
and 1840 adjacent to other Ripleys of age to be his widowed mother and siblings: Phoebe (b.
1770–80), Henry (b. 1790–1800), Samuel (b. 1790–1800), and a younger male in Phoebe's 1830
household (b. 1810–1820) of age to be James C., who named sons Thomas C. and Ambrose.47
• The head of this Greene Co. cluster appears to be one Thomas Ripley who first appears in
Greene on 2 October 1790 as bondman for the marriage of John Stanfield (whose family would
be the Ripleys next-door neighbors in 1830–40) and continues in Greene Co. records until the
1820s.48 Various online trees assert, without documentation, that Thomas Ripley (1769–1824)
and "Phoebe Stanfield" (1773–1844) also had a son Pleasant, born 1793 in Greene Co., TN, who
died "before 1880" in Knox County, Kentucky.49
44 A rare appearance of the name John Ripley is also found 23 October 1802 amid a list of letters in the Nashville, TN, post office. See Sherida
K. Eddlemon, Genealogical Abstracts from Tennessee Newspapers, 1791–1808 (Bowie, MD: Heritage Books: 1988), 41.
45 "Texas, Memorials and Petitions, 1839–1929," database with images, Ancestry (http://interactive.ancestry.com/2218/32845
_1220701439_2349-00217/3222?backurl=http://person.ancestry.com/tree/34732885/person/19121927639/facts/citation/800032433148/edit
/record : accessed 29 May 2016), Ambrose Ripley file. Also "Alabama, Marriages, Deaths, Wills, Court, and Other Records, 1784–1920,"
database, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 29 May 2016), entry for Ambrose Ripley to Rachel Wood, 28 September 1820,
Madison Co., "Representatives – Salsbery." Also 1850 U.S. census, Titus Co., TX, p. 112; and 1860 U.S. census, Titus Co., TX, p. 194. Thomas L.
Ripley appears to have migrated with him. Both were taxed as landowners and polls in 1840, in Red River County (parent county of Titus). See
Gifford White, 1840 Citizens of Texas, vol. 2, Tax Rolls (Nacogdoches, TX: Ericson Books, 1984), 152.
46 1850 U.S. Census, Benton Co., AL, p. 786, dwelling/family 12/12 (James C. Ripley). 1860 U.S. Census, Titus Co., TX, Precinct 11, p. 38,
dwell./fam. 251/265 (Ambrose Ripley).
47 1830 U.S. Census, Greene Co., TN, p. 146. 1840 U.S. Census, Greene Co., TN, p. 224.
48 Goldene Fillers Burgner Greene County, Tennessee, Marriages, 1783–1868 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1981), 5–also 21, 62, 78.
For Thomas's consistent residence in the county until the 1820s, see Pollyanna Creekmore, Early East Tennessee Taxpayers (Easley, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1980), 180 (year 1805); Sherida K. Eddlemon, Genealogical Abstracts from Tennessee Newspapers, 1803–1812
(Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1989), 34 (year 1808); Byron and Barbara Sistler, Early Tennessee Tax Lists (Nashville: Byron Sistler & Associates,
1977), 170 (year 1812, Greene Co.); Goldene Fillers Burgner, Greene County, Tennessee, Minutes of The Court of Common Pleas, 1783–1795
(Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1982); Sandra Kelton Houston, Greene County, Tennessee, Minutes of the Court of Common Pleas, 1797–
1807 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1981), 17, 43, 44, 62, 121, 151, 154, 163, 167, 177, 226 239; and Goldene Fillers Burgner, North
Carolina Land Grants Recorded in Greene County, Tennessee (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1981), 62, 64, 67, 83, 91.
49 For example, see smacaula52, "Macaulay Family Tree," user contributed tree, Ancestry http://person.ancestry.com/tree
/44615900/person/25106661689/facts : accessed 28 May 2016). One Pleasant Mills married Lucinda Parvin, 1820, in Madison County, AL—just
two months before the Madison Co. marriage of Ambrose Ripley of the Texas massacre; see "Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800–1969,"
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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Given the rarity of the name Ripley throughout the South—and the relative rareness of Pleasant as a
given name, this Thomas Ripley of Greene County represents a candidate for the previously
unidentified son of Elizabeth (Mills) Learwood Ripley who also, supposedly named a son Pleasant."
6. ANNE (AKA ANNA) MILLS, b. ca. 1732; unmarried at time of father's 1755 will. She is frequently, but
without evidence, said to be the wife of Lewis Witt—based apparently on the fact that her will cited
her eldest son as "Mills Witt" and named other children who bore names carried by Anne Mills's
siblings (Jesse, Millie, and Elizabeth).50 Lewis Witt was dead by 23 May 1774, when his estate was
appraised.51 His widow Anne made her will on 9 December 1811. The recorded copy, made when
the will was probated on 28 October 1816, names seven living children: Mills, Jesse, John, Rowland,
Robert, "Agnes," and Milly—and a deceased daughter "Betsy Calvert" who had left five children.52
Her estate settlement of 1826 cites 186 acres on Otter River and identifies her daughter "Agnes" as
"Agatha Lavender" and her daughter Milly as "Milly Whitton."53 No direct evidence has been found
to identify Anne Mills as the widow Anne Witt, although significant indirect evidence supports it.
7. MILDRED "MILLIE" MILLS, b. ca. 1734, VA; died 1822. Unmarried at time of father's 1755 will, Millie
married twice in Amherst: (1) William Lavender54 and (2) William Walton. In 1770, Lavender
purchased land on Tye River adjacent to land Millie's brother Jesse had bought from the same seller
three years earlier.55 William and Millie sold this land shortly before Christmas 1773.56 In March
1776, William's estate was appraised by Wm. Pollard, Lucas Powell, and Richard Tankersly.57 On 16
April 1792, Millie married William Walton, an RW veteran with whom she joined her son William
database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 May 2016). At this point of research, it appears equally possible that Ambrose
and Pleasant of Titus Co., TX—and James C. of Alabama whose son Ambrose also went to Titus Co., TX, were sons of Elizabeth and John
Ripley's son Pleasant, who seems to be in Rhea Co., TN, in 1830; see 1830 U.S. Census, Rhea Co., TN, p. 355. Both Rhea Co., TN, and Madison
Co., AL, need to be worked well for Ripleys.
50 Bedford Co., VA, Will Book 4: 276–77, Will of Anne Witt.
51 Ann Chilton, Bedford Co., Va., Will Book 1, 1759–1787; Will Book 2, 1787–1803 (Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1988), 18; citing
Will Book 1: 211.
52 Bedford Co., VA, Will Book 4:276–77.
53 Bedford Co., VA, Will Book 4:287.
54 Many descendants have garbled the identity of William Lavender, conflating him with a contemporary Charles Lavender who was his
father. See, for example, KayMarie Ybarra, "KayMarieRettaYabarra," user-contributed tree, Ancestry (http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/60751412
/person/34299038922/facts : accessed 17 May 2016), "Mildred Millie Mills … 1738 … 1776," profile page. The double-name attributed to her
husband, "William Charles," is not supported by any record he created in his lifetime and is highly dubious. Giving children double forenames
was not a common practice in the colonies prior to the Revolution; when it is found, the situation typically involves Anglican elites. Other trees
echo some of the same facts and generally provide a correct list of children but sometimes with significant wrong dates. See, for example,
Michael Spillars, "Spillars Family Tree," user-contributed tree, Ancestry (person.ancestry.com/tree/54902/person/6049440132/facts : accessed
17 May 2016), profile for "Mildred Amelia Mills, Birth 1738 • Virginia, United States; Death 1776 • Amherst, Amherst, Virginia" and Jlav78,
"Lavender Family Tree," Ancestry (person.ancestry.com/tree/27253432/person/26082618067/facts). The pension applications of Millie's sons
William and Charles Lavender offer abundant pointers to kin and other places of residence. See:
• William Lavender (Private Capt. Allen's Co., Col. Taylor's Regt., Virginia Line), Widow Sarah, no. W20189 in "Revolutionary War Pensions,"
Fold3 (https://www.fold3.com/image/25255701 and 33 subsequent numbers).
• Charles Lavender (Pvt., Col. Merriwether & Samuel Cabell Regt., Va. Continental Line), Widow Lucy, no. W8025, in "Revolutionary War
Pensions," Fold3 (https://www.fol3.com/image/25254588 and 109 subsequent images : accessed 17 May 2016). .
55 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 121 citing Amherst Deed Book C: 78.
56 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 153; citing Amherst Deed Book D: 119.
57 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Wills of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1865 (1985; reprint, Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1998), 210,
citing Book 1:432 with notation "see Page 509 for 1793, for more data."
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Lavender and his wife Sarah in selling land her first husband had inherited from Charles Lavender
Sr.58 She and Walton moved to Burke Co., NC, where he died 29 January 1806.59 By 1808 she was
living in Maury Co., TN, where she appeared at the estate sale of John McDonald, being the only
other woman there aside from McDonald's widow Elizabeth.60 In 1810, her son George Lavender
filed a legislative petition from Nelson County, VA, stating that his mother "in Tennessee" was
holding a slave from his father's estate—one he wanted to bring back into Virginia but could not do
so under Virginia's existing laws.61 She has not been found on the 1820 census, but a probate was
opened for her in Maury County, TN, in 1822.62 (Records of Maury, where one Jesse Walton also
appears on the 1820 census, have not yet been studied. Near neighbors of the Maury County Jesse
were Bickerstaffs, of the family that buried Ambrose Mills after the "Patriot" forces hung him on
their farm.) Millie's impetus for moving to TN as a 72-year-old widow has not been identified.
6. JESSE MILLS, b. ca. 1736, VA; heir to a "proportionable part of his father's land beside the land [his
father] lived on." Married, allegedly, Lucy Tilman.63 He remained in Amherst at least until 1767,
when he cosigned a bond for the new county sheriff.64 In 1768, he and Lucy sold their land on a
branch of Tye River,65 and in 1770 he sold his remaining acreage alone.66 In 1771 and 1772, he felt
into debt, appears to have paid it off, but again had to mortgage his personal property in 1776.67 He
may have left Amherst at this point, possibly to join his Loyalist brothers in North Carolina or
possibly to Kentucky in an effort to escape the war zone. At this point, I've found no further mention
of the name "Jesse Mills" until after the Revolution. In 1784, in Amherst, he mortgaged a slave and
livestock to Tilman Walton, with William Walton (Millie's future husband) as witness. The fact that
Jesse did not give a mortgage on land—the first choice of all creditors, because slaves and stock
might die while land did not—strongly suggests that Jesse no longer owned land. Various
researchers assert that he later lived in Bedford County and/or died in Kentucky. None offer any
58 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 278; citing Amherst Deed Book G: 254.
59 Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 May 2016), "William Walton Sr.," memorial page 7323283, created 2 April 2003
by "Armantia."
60 Jan Grant, transcriber, "Maury County, Tennessee, Wills and Settlements Book A Vol. 1, 1807-1824," compiled by Jill K. Garrett and Marise
P. Lightfoot, March 1964; citing p. A:4; HTML file, Tennessee Genealogy Trails (http://genealogytrails.com/tenn/maury/willssettlements
.html : accessed 24 May 2016).
61 Library of Virginia, "Legislative Petitions Digital Collection," database with images, Virginia Memory (www.virginiamemory.com
/collections/petitions : downloaded 22 May 2016), George Lavender petition 13 December 1810; citing Legislative Petitions of the General
Assembly, 1776–1856, Accession Number 36121, Box 177, Folder 10.
62 Byron and Barbara Sistler, Index to Tennessee Wills & Administrations, 1779–1861 (Nashville: Byron Sistler & Associates, 1990), 377.
63 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1. Hiden's source for Lucy's identity is not clear; but she has proved exceedingly accurate
on every other point on which I've tested her.
64 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 103; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 261-62.
65 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 110; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 264.
66 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 127; citing Amherst Deed Book C: 178.
67 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 134 (citing Deed Book C: 252), 134 (citing Deed Book C: 254), also Davis, 137 (citing Deed Book C: 316) and 167
(citing Deed Book C: 397).
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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documentary evidence or appear to have tried to reconstruct his life. (One Kentucky man of his
name, rooted in Bedford Co. but with a young wife and a small child, would appear to be a different
man.68) Jesse has not been found on the "1787 census of Virginia" that has been reconstructed from
tax rolls.69 He may be the Jesse Mills (1 male over 16, with 3 females) on the 1790 Rutherford Co.,
NC census, enumerated two doors from William Mills, the son of his brother Ambrose.70 Neither
Ambrose nor his son William had a son Jesse who could be the 1790 neighbor. (It is also possible
that the Jesse of 1790 Rutherford Co. was a heretofore-unidentified son of the Loyalist William Mills
Jr., who was executed in 1780. If so, the Jesse and William of 1790, living two houses apart, would
be first cousins.)
RESEARCH NOTES
1732
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"Wm. Mills patented 400 a. lying on the branches of Lickinghole Creek in the Co. of Goochland adjoining
Saml. Coleman and Henry Chiles."71
31 OCTOBER 1732
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"Henry Chiles and Ann, his wife, of Hanover Co., sold to Wm. Mills of Goochland, 300 a. on the east side
of Lickinghole Creek."72
12 MARCH 1734
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"Wm. Mills to Francis Kearby for 100 a, part of the 400 he had patented the year before. Mary Mills, his
wife, relinquishes her dower rights in this land."73
68 See E. S. Mills, "Mills: Literature Survey of Southside Virginia: Brunswick, Goochland, and Counties Cut from Them—Principally Albemarle,
Amherst, Cumberland, Bedford, and Prince Edward," report to file, 28 May 2016.
69 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 103; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 261-62.
70 1790 U.S. census, Rutherford Co., N.C. p. 145, lines 1–16.
71 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing "S.L.O. [State Land Office] Book 14, p. 407."
72 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing Goochland Deed Book 1: 366.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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1735
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"Wm. Mills sells the remainder of the tract he had purchased from Henry Chiles."74
1736
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"Wm. Mills ... sells the remainder of the 400 a. he had patented in 1732."75
CA. 15 JUNE 1736
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"William Mills of St. James Parish, Goochland, sold James Walker 300 acres on branches of Licking Hole
Creek for £15.5 part of a greater tract Mills took up by patent 11 April 1732 bounded by Samuel
Coleman, Chiles corner, Scott's line, Kerby's line & Henry Chiles. Mary released dower. Wit: John Pryor,
Henry Chiles, Peter Patrick."76
8 SEPTEMBER 1736
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Disambiguation.
(Not William Mills of Goochland/Albemarle)
"For 40 shillings, grant to William Mills, 400 acres on the Ridge between Willis River and great Guinea
Creek of Appamattox River, Goochland county, bounded as follows:
Beginning at a red Oak in Almes Allen's Line, running Thence New Lines North fifty Degrees West one
hundred and twenty six Poles to a white Oak, North twenty five Degrees East one hundred and seventy
Poles to a Pine, Thence on John Marten North sixty Degrees East seventy Poles to a white Oak and
Hiccory, Thence New Lines North twenty five Degrees East one hundred and forty two Poles to Pointers,
South sixty five Degrees East one hundred and forty seven Poles to oa white Oak, Soth twenty five
Degrees West thirty five Poles to a white Oak, Thence on William Warnack the same Course continued
two hundred and ninety three Poles to a Spanish Oak, Thence on James Allen North seventy five Degrees
73 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing Goochland Deed Book 1: 487.
74 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing Goochland Deed Book 2: 168.
75 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing Goochland Deed Book 2: 231.
76 Carl R Waggle, "Genealogy Report: Ancestors of Mary Elizabeth Lewis," user trees, Genealogy.com (http://www.genealogy
.com/ftm/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html : accessed 23 May 2016), citing Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 2: 231.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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West fifty two Poles to a white Oak South thirty seven Degrees West sixty seven Poles to the first
station.77
COMMENT:
• "Willis River is a 61.8-mile-long branch of the James River. It "rises in southern Buckingham
County and initially flows eastwardly into Cumberland County, where it turns northnortheastwardly
for the remainder of its course. It flows into the James River in northern
Cumberland County, about 6 miles … southeast of Columbia."78
• This William Mills of Willis River would remain there as late as 1760, when he and his land
were in Cumberland County (cut from Goochland in 1749).
16 MAY 1738
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
William Mills witnessed a deed between John Winn of Henrico and Humphrey Parris for land on North
side of the James in Goochland, along with William & Humphrey Parrish Jr."79
TO DO:
The recorded deed needs to be obtained and studied for an accurate identification.
16 SEPTEMBER 1740
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
John Parrish sold land on South branch of Owens Creek bounded by William Mills, Henry Adkins, and
Stephen Lacy."80
TO DO:
The recorded deed needs to be obtained and studied for an accurate identification.
14 SEPTEMBER 1741
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"George Hilton sold land on Licking Hold Creek, bounded by Thomas Biby, Christian's line, and William
Mills."81
77 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin
/GetLONN.pl?first=407&last=&g_p=P17&collection=LO_Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, Willliam, grantee … Goochland County …
400 acres on the ridge between Willis River and Great Guinea Creek of Appamattox River"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p.
164 (Reel 15).
78 "Willis River," Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willis_River : accessed 24 May 2016).
79 Carl R Waggle, "Genealogy Report: Ancestors of Mary Elizabeth Lewis," user trees, Genealogy.com (http://www.genealogy
.com/ftm/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html : accessed 23 May 2016), citing Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 3, page 121.
80 Carl R Waggle, "Genealogy Report: Ancestors of Mary Elizabeth Lewis," user trees, Genealogy.com (http://www.genealogy
.com/ftm/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html : accessed 23 May 2016); no book/page cited.
81 Carl R Waggle, "Genealogy Report: Ancestors of Mary Elizabeth Lewis," user trees, Genealogy.com (http://www.genealogy
.com/ftm/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html : accessed 23 May 2016); no book/page cited.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
TO DO:
The recorded deed needs to be obtained and studied for an accurate identification.
14 NOVEMBER 1743
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"William Mills sold land to Josias Payne."82
TO DO:
The recorded deed needs to be obtained and studied for an accurate identification.
1744
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
County formation.
Albemarle is created this year from the western portion of Goochland.
15 MAY 1744
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Unproved possibility.
"William & Mary Mills sold land to John Robards. … (This may be when they moved away or were cut
off into Albemarle County as he does not appear in the 1744 Vestry book of St. James Northam.)"83
TO DO:
The recorded deed needs to be obtained and studied for an accurate identification. The deed
should state where William Mills resided at the time of the sale.
COMMENT:
Most researchers working on William and Mary assume that they were the same-name couple in
the 1832–44 Goochland documents; and (as speculated by the researcher quoted in the note
above) they assume the couple moved after 1744 to the western part of Goochland that became
Albemarle. However, one anomaly exists: The Albemarle/Amherst records created by and about
William and Mary reveal absolutely no associates in common with those of the Goochland
couple. That is a significant aberration of behavioral patterns in a society in which people formed
a dependable, consistent support-network of associates.
28 AUGUST 1746
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
Disambiguation.
(Not William Mills of Goochland/Albemarle)
82 Carl R Waggle, "Genealogy Report: Ancestors of Mary Elizabeth Lewis," user trees, Genealogy.com (http://www.genealogy
.com/ftm/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html : accessed 23 May 2016), citing Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 4:270.
83 Carl R Waggle, "Genealogy Report: Ancestors of Mary Elizabeth Lewis," user trees, Genealogy.com (http://www.genealogy
.com/ftm/w/a/g/Carl-R-Waggle-CA/GENE3-0010.html : accessed 23 May 2016), citing Goochland Deeds & Wills Book 4:356.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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"For 40 shillings, grant to William Mills, 380 acres on "both sides of Pidy Rock Rua [sic] of Willis River,
Goochland County, bounded as follows:
Beginning at Pointers Ralph Kippings Corner running thence a New Line North Seventy five Degrees East
two hundred and four Poles crossing Pidy Rock Run to Pointers[,] thence on Anthony Levellain's North
thirty Degrees East nineteen Poles crossing a Branch to Pointers[,] North Seventy Degrees East two
hundred and four Poles to Pointers[,] thence on William Daniel South nineteen and an half Degree East
one hundred and fifty nine poles to Pointers[,] thence a new Line South nineteen Degrees East one
hundred Poles to Pointers, North Seventy Degrees West two hundred and give Poles to Pointers[,] thence
on William Easley North thirty five Degrees West forty five Poles to a White Oak[,] South fifty five Degrees
West two hundred and one Poles crossing two Branches of Pidy Rocky Run to Pointers[,] Thence on Ralph
Hipping [Kipping?] north thirty five Degrees West one hundred and Seventy eight Poles to the first
Station."84
COMMENT:
• This land would fall into Cumberland County and would later be sold by its owner "William
Mills of Cumberland County" during the time that William and Mary Mills lived in Amherst.
• Pidy Rock is said by one area researcher to be "north of Cairo (Caira?)."85
JUNE 1747–JUNE 1748
ALBEMARLE-AMHERST COUNTIES, VA [ADJACENT TO BRUNSWICK-LUNENBURG]
Land Grant.
Report by Johua Fry, Gentleman, Surveyor, listing surveys he had made in Albemarle (now Amherst)
between June 1747 and June 1748. The list includes:
William Mills 54 acres
Marvel Stone 390 acres
Thomas Stone 130 acres, 200 acres
Thomas Watts 335 acres86
COMMENT:
• Whether the grantee is William Sr. or Jr. is undetermined
• No other Millses or Wattses are included.
• William Mills's son Ambrose married Mourning Stone.87 Their son William Mills gave the name
Marvel to one of his own sons.88
The Stone and Watts surveys were actually made in March 1748:
84 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin
/GetLONN.pl?first=230&last=&g_p=P25&collection=LO_Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, Willliam, grantee … Goochland County …
380 acres on both sides of Pidy Rock Rua [sic] of Willis River; citing "Land Office Patents No. 25, 1745-1747, p. 230 (Reel 23).
85 Diane Jones , "(Bolling5) Children of Ann ____ Bolling Amoss," posted 14 October 2013, Bolling Research Mailing List
(http://bolling5.com/pipermail/bollingresearch_bolling5.com/2013-October/007690.html : accessed 28 May 2016).
86 Thomas Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 1, 3.
87 J. M. Edney's 1846 biography of his grandfather William Mills.
88 Obituary of Mr. Marvel Mills, "Marriage and Death Notices from the Greenville Mountaineer," South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral
Research (SCMAR) 7 (Winter 1979): page number not given, citing issue of 10 August 1749; accessed as South Carolina Records and Reference,
CD-ROM (Orem, UT: Ancestry.com, 1998). Also see Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114368978&|
ref=acom : accessed 6 June 2015), memorial 114368978, "Maj William Mills," created by Holt Felmet, 25 July 2013.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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"Thos. Stone, 200 ac; Mar 28, 1748; joyning South side Pedlar River; joyning Geo Watts, Horsly's
creek, Thos Stone."
"Thos. Watts, 335 ac; Mar 30, 1478 [sic]; branches of Pedlar River; by Thomas Turpin; joining
Robt. Davis, Edwd Watts." 89
JUNE 1748 – JUNE 1749
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Land survey.
William Mills. Survey, 54 acres, by Joshua Fry, Gent."90
COMMENT:
I have twice examined the online land grants in an effort to locate this grant and could not find
him under any conceivable variant spelling or misreading.
1749
CUMBERLAND COUNTY
Context.
Goochland County was subdivided, with Cumberland being created in the southwest of old Goochland.
1 APRIL 1749
GOOCHLAND COUNTY
Land grant.
On payment of 40 shillings, grant made and confirmed unto William Mills. 400 acres in Goochland
County "on both sides of Pedlar River and Dancing Creek" bounded as follows:
"Beginning at two Spanish Oaks on the North Side the said River[,] running Thence down the same
and across making in a Right line two hundred and twenty Poles to a Willow Tree on the South Side
[of] the River[.] Thence into the Woods North twenty five Degrees West at one hundred and seventy
a Branch[,] in all two hundred and thirty Poles to a red Oak near a Branch[,] North two hundred and
sixty Poles crossing two Branches and Dancing Creek to two Dogwoods and a Gum[,] South seventy
six Degrees east at seventy six [to] Pedlar River[[,] in all two hundred and sixteen Poles to Pointers on
the side of Valley[,] and South twenty Degrees West two hundred and twenty Poles to Beginning." 91
9 AUGUST 1749
ALBEMARLE-AMHERST COUNTIES, VA
Land sale.
89 Eric G. Grundset, "Land lying in the County of Albemarle:" Albemarle County, Virginia Surveyors' Plat Books, Volume 1, Parts 1 and 2, and
Volume 2, 1744–1853 [and 1891] (Fairfax, VA: Privately printed, 1998), 18; citing vol. 1, pp. 64 and 68.
90 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 2; citing Albemarle Order Book 1744–1748, p. 364.
91 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl
?first=539&last=&g_p=P288&collection=LO_Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, Willliam, grantee … Albemarle County … 400 acres on
both sides of Pedlar River and on Dancing Creek"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 28, 1746–1749 (v. 1 & w p.1-730), p. 539 (Reel 26)."
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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"Apparently Wm. Mills's dau. Sarah Watts, named in his will, was the wife of Thos. Watts, as in
Albemarle Rec. D. B. 1, p. 96, Aug. 9, 1749, Thos. and Sarah Watts sell to Peter Bays 400 a. on north side
of Pedlar River."92
1750
LUNENBURG COUNTY, VA
Tax roll.
"For 1750: List taken by Nicholas Haile." [about 120 taxpayers in all; I'm skipping first 75 or so]
John Keeth
John Macfaull
William Mills 1 [Likely William Jr., given that the locale is Lunenburg rather than Albemarle
and that there is only one male tithe; note below the proximity
of his brother-in-law Thomas Watts ]
William Hays
John Richardson
William Bennet
Peter Bennet
Joseph Bennet
Nicholas Welsh
[skip 15]
Charles Simmons
William Linch
Thomas Wats 1
John Boon
John Smith
Peter Kinsey
Joshua Bartlet [In the Fairfield family: John Watts's eldest son, Thomas Watts, named
his own son Bartlet Watts]93
John Anderson
Jeremiah Scafe
[end of list]94
"1750 List taken by John Phelps"
William Mobberley 1 [Several of the Mobberley/Mobley family moved to Little River, SC,
with Ambrose Mills]
Benjn. Turman
John Jennings 2
Edwd. Mobberly, Junr.
Thomas Mobberly
92 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1.
93 Wynema McGrew, Watts is My Line: John and Judith (?) Watts, Settlers of the Mississippi Territory, vol. 1 (Hattiesburg, Miss.: P.p., 2010),
particularly 158–59. This family history is unusually well documented.
94 Landon C. Bell, Sunlight on the Southside: List of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia; 1748–1783 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.,
1974), 135–38; no source cited.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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Roger Conner 3
Edwd. Mobberly 1
Benjn. Mobberly 1
[skip 10 households]
Clemt. Mobberley 1
[skip 7 households]
Capt. Linch [Wm. Linch is cited adjacent to Thos. Watts in Hailes Dist.]
Harry co*ckram 3
Jno. Mobberley
Mordecai Mobberley
Hamon Mobberley 6
[skip 2 households]
Jno. Payne
Chs. Spurlock
Ambrose Mills 4 [Ambrose, the next year, is identified as Payne's overseer]
[skip 5 households]
Wm. Stone [Ambrose Mills's wife at this time was Mourning Stone]95
Robt. Irons
Wm. Stone Junr.
Euseibus Stone 496
12–14 APRIL 1750
ALBEMARLE COUNTY
Land survey.
"Wm Mills' 350 ac; Ap 12, 1750; on branches Buck Creek; by William Cabell, joining Edward Watts Jr."
"William Mills; 330 ac; Ap 13, 1750; on branches Buck branch; by William Cabell; joining Thos. Mills,
John Davis, Isham Davis."
"Thos. Smith, 350 ac; Ap 14 1750; on Pedlar River; by William Cabell; joining Wm Mills, Edward Watts,
John Stones."97
1752
LUNENBURG COUNTY, VA
Tax List.
"For 1752, List taken by John Phelps."
[skip 28]
"Mr. John Payn's list [someone has penciled into the book "of Goochland"]
Ambrose Mills, Overseer 7 [RW Loyalist colonel; 1762 grant on Little River, Cheraw/Camden
/Fairfield SC, adjoined William Watts's "Watts Branch"]
[skip 12]
95 Lyman C. Draper, Kings Mountain and Its Heroes: History of the Battle of King's Mountain, October 7th, 1780 (Cincinnati: Peter G.
Thompson, 1881), 481. His biography of Col. Ambrose Mills does not provide sources. Also see J. M. Edney's 1846 biography of his grandfather
William Mills, citing Mourning Stone as Ambrose's wife and William's mother.
96 Landon C. Bell, Sunlight on the Southside: List of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia; 1748–1783 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.,
1974), 144–47, particularly p. 145; no source cited.
97 Eric G. Grundset, "Land lying in the County of Albemarle:" Albemarle County, Virginia Surveyors' Plat Books, Volume 1, Parts 1 and 2, and
Volume 2, 1744–1853 [and 1891] (Fairfax, VA: Privately printed, 1998), 31–32; citing vol. 1, pp. 127, 133.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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Edwd. Mobberley 1 [1756 on Little River, Cheraw/Camden/Fairfield, SC] 98
Clemt. Mobberley 1 [also settled on Little River]99
Benjn. Mobberley 1 [also settled on Little River]100
Thos. Halsey
Richd. Hill
Robt. Baber
Israel Peterson
Wm. Verdeman
Robt. Verrdeman
Wm. Verdeman, Junr.
Jonas Anderson
Stepn. Hudson
Petr. Hudson
Col. Wm. Randolph
Frs. Luck, overseer
[skip 19]
Jas. Standeford [In 1810–15, in daughter county Franklin, the Standefords/Sanderfurs,
[skip 3] Millses, and Callaways were next-door neighbors.
Rich. Callaway
Amb. Bramlet
[skip 56]
Wm. Callaway
Wm. Gowin [Gowins were Fairfield associates & neighbors of Watts]
Robt. Graves
Wm. Simmons
Jno. Mounts
Jno. Mounts, Jr.
Wm. Watkins
Saml. Watkins
Yowel Watkins
Jno. Wood
Capt. Chs. Lynch's list
Thos. Price
Rice Price
Edward Wats
Edwd. Wats, Junr. [Edward Jr. and William took out adjacent grants, 1763, Wateree River
Wm. Wats adj. Thomas Watts. Edw. Jr. & William Watts moved 1762–65 to Little
Geo. Wats River, adjacent/contigous to Ambrose Mills, near Mobleys of Bedford]
Jno. Wats 5
Jno. Denny [This Denny family would appear to be the one into which William and
Jno. Denny. Junr. Mary's alleged granddaughter Anne Learwood is said to have married.]
Zach. Denny
98 Ann Chilton, Bedford County, Virginia, Deed Book B2 (Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1992), 7, citing B-2: 94; "Deed from Edw.
Mobberly (Craven Co., SC) to Samuel Drake, 330 Acres on Otter River," Bedford Co.
99 Kenneth Shelton, All That Dare Oppose Them: The Whig Victory at Mobley's Meeting House, June 1780 (P.p.: P.p., 2005), 22.
100 Kenneth Shelton, All That Dare Oppose Them: The Whig Victory at Mobley's Meeting House, June 1780 (P.p.: P.p., 2005), 22.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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Robt. Worthen's list
Jno. Braisey, Overs.
Jno. Reed
Benjn. Arnolds, Qr.
Thos. Gaddey, Overs.
Richd. Turner
Jason Meader [moved to Anson Co., NC, as did George Watts, above]
Job Meader 2 [Little River, SC, land grant in 1760;101 in Anson Co., NC, by 1762;102
back on Little River of Fairfield in 1790; son-in-law of Edward
Mobberly, Sr., who is taxed at the start of this list103]
Joel Meader
Benjn. Orrick
Jno. Eckols
Jeffery Crowley
Wm. Harvey
Lewis Meador [moved to Anson Co., NC]
[skip 39]
Jas. Gibson 1 [Fairfield, SC, 1790]
Randal Gibson 1 [Fairfield, SC, 1790]
Thos. Prather
Adam Biard
Thos. Walker
Wm. Briant
Jno. Davison
Henry Farguson
Matw. Amory
Wm. Armstrong
Thos. Carr
John Mills 2 [kinship not known; he is not named as a son in William Mills's will
made 1755 and probated 1766. In 1753, this John served on a road
crew "in room of Wm. Mills."104]
[skip 7, to end of list]105
COMMENT:
Several other families on this list—Gibsons, Goynes/Gowins, and Meadors—would move down
to Craven Co. (later Camden Dist. and Fairfield Co.) SC.
101 Kenneth Shelton, All That Dare Oppose Them: The Whig Victory at Mobley's Meeting House, June 1780 (P.p.: P.p., 2005), 22.
102 Ann Chilton, Bedford Co., Va., Deed Book A-1, 1754–1762 (Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1987), 22; deed from "Job Meador of
Anson Co., N.C., to John Williams of Bedford County, 70 acres lying on the South side of Otter River." The Mobberlys/Mobleys who moved to
Fairfield also lived on Otter River in Bedford. The Wattses of Bedford owned land on Elk and Ivy Creeks, as did the Woodwards who also moved
to Fairfield where they were Watts neighbors.
103 Kenneth Shelton, All That Dare Oppose Them: The Whig Victory at Mobley's Meeting House, June 1780 (P.p.: P.p., 2005), 100, 118.
Shelton cites Robert Mills, "Statistics of South Carolina, 1826" for statement that Job Meador died Oct. 1822 at 101 years of age.
104 June Banks Evans, Lunenburg County, Virginia: Order Book 2 ½-B, 1753–1754 (New Orleans, LA: Bryn Ffyliaiad Publication, 1998), 41;
citing Order Book 2 ½-B: 469
105 Landon C. Bell, Sunlight on the Southside: Lists of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia, 1748–1783 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.,
1974), 202–8.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
7 AUGUST 1752
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Land sale
William Mills of Albemarle County to Martha Massie of New Kent County, sale of 400 acres in Albemarle
Co. on Pedlar River described as:
"Beginning at two Spanish Oaks on the North side of the said River, running thence down the same and
aross making in a Right line two hundred & twenty Poles to a Willow tree on the South Side of the River,
thence into the woods North twenty five Degrees west at one hundred & Seventy a branch, in all two
hundred & thirty Poles to a red oak near a branch, North two hundred & Sixty Poles Crossing two ranches
& Dancing Creek & two Dogwoods & Gum South twenty Six Degrees East at Seventy Six, Pedlar River, in
all two hundred & Sixteen Poles to Pointers on the side of a vallee & South twenty Degrees West two
hundred & twenty Poles to the Beginning."
7 August 1752, Mills put Massie in possession of the property.
13 August 1752, Mills acknowledged receiving 200 pounds from Massie in full payment. Mary, William's
wife, also appeared in court to be privately examined about the relinquishment of her dower rights.106
COMMENT:
• William Sr. patented this land in 1749 on "Pedlar River and Dancing Creek."
• Why would a single woman buy this land from Mills? It's rural; part of it is in woods. It's not a
town lot where she would have close neighbors. Typically, Mills would be part of Martha's
support network. This conclusion is strengthened by the point that Mills legally put her in
possession of the property a week before he received payment.
TO DO:
• Martha Massie should be studied as a potential mother-in-law or sister of William Mills.
• New Kent should be studied as potential place of prior residence for William Mills.
31 OCTOBER 1753
LUNENBURG COUNTY, VA
Court order.
"John Mills aptd surveyor rd from Euing's fence to the Blew Ridge in room of William Mills."107
COMMENT:
This reference should be to William Jr. William Sr. should have been too old for road service at
this time. William Sr.'s 1755 will does not name a son John.
1754
GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA
106 Albermarle Co. Wills & Deeds, Book 1: 475-76.
107 June Banks Evans, Lunenburg County, Virginia: Order Book 2 ½-B, 1753–1754 (New Orleans, LA: Bryn Ffyliaiad Publication, 1998), 41;
citing Order Book 2 ½-B: 469.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Disambiguation.
"Wm. Mills ... sells to Tobias Payne the 400 acres that he patented in 1736.108
COMMENT:
This reference is to William Mills's grant of 400 acres "on the ridge between Willis's River &
Great Goochland Creek, patented to him on 1 April 1749.
TO DO:
Get the origtinal document for full details. Confirm the 1754 residence of the grantor. Was he in
Goochland or Albemarle? If Goochland, we would have evidence that the Goochland grants
were not all made to William of Goochland-Albemarle.
12 APRIL 1754
ALBEMARLE COUNTY
Land survey.
"Nicholas Davis Gent, 25,000 ac; April 12, 1754; on both sides Fluvanna River [south branch of the
James]; 3,450 acres part thereof was formerly granted 21,550 acres New Land included by Order of
Council and survey'd by William Cabell; joining Colo Fry & Company, N. Davis, Jno. Anthony, Rev'd Wm
Stith, Rich'd Burk Braton & Co., Carrington & Mayo, Wm Mills, Jno. Davis, Rob't Davis, Cornelius Nevil
(400 ac), Nich. Davis. Shows the following watercourses: Hunting Creek, Tuckahoe Creek, Cabbin Creek,
Indian Camp Creek, Vineyard Creek, Tumblin Creek, Cold Camp Creek, Wide Mouth Creek, Salt Creek,
and Pedlar River along with numerous islands in the river."109
6 SEPTEMBER 1755
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Will.
"In the Name of God Amen. I William Mills of Albemarle County, being weak in Body, although I bless
God of a perfect sence & Memory, but calling to mind the uncertainty of this Transitory World, and that
all flesh must Yield when it pleases God to call, therefore I do Constitute this to be my Last Will and
Testatment and desire it may be received by all persons as such.
"First, I commit my body to the Earth to be decently buried by my Executors hereafter named and
Secondly I submit my soul to almighty God who gave it to me in full & sure hopes of a Resurrection at
the last day; and as Touching my worldly Estate, and what it has pleased God to bless me with, I give and
dispose of it as followeth (To Wit).
"Imprimis, I give & bequeath all my personal estate that I am possest with as long as she lives, to my
dearly beloved Wife Mary Mills.
"Item, I give and bequeath to my son Ambrose Mills a proportionable part of all my estate excepting my
Lands, [at] the death of his mother (my wife).
108 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing Goochland Deed Book 4: 270.
109 Eric G. Grundset, "Land lying in the County of Albemarle:" Albemarle County, Virginia Surveyors' Plat Books, Volume 1, Parts 1 and 2, and
Volume 2, 1744–1853 [ad 1891] (Fairfax, VA: Privately printed, 1998), 63; citing vol. 1, p. 277.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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"Item, I give & bequeath to my Daughter Sarah Watts a proportionable part of all my Estate Excepting
my Lands—
"Item I give & bequeath to my Son William Mills a proportionable part of all my moveable Estate, and
the Three Hundred & thirty acres of Land that's unsettled, to have & hold forever.
"Item, I give & bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Learwood a proportionable part of all my Estate
excepting my lands to have & to hold forever—
"Item, I give & bequeath to my daughter Anna Mills a proportionable part of all my Estate excepting my
land to have & to hold forever.
"Item, I give & bequeath to my son Jesse Mills a proportionable part of all my Estate besides my Lands &
the Tract of Land I now live on, to have & to hold forever—
"Item, I give & bequeath to my Daughter Milley Mills a proportionable part of all my Estate Excepting
my lands to have & to hold forever.
"Item, I give & bequeath to my son Thomas Mills's children (Vizt) Ambrose Mills Junr & Elizabeth Mills
(the son & daughter of the Decd. Thomas Mills) a proportionable part of all my Estate Excepting my
lands, to be Equally Devided Between them to have & to hold forever, to be paid to them after my
dearly beloved Wife Mary Mills's Death or if it should please the Almighty God that I should die first &
[if] my wife should think proper to alter her Station of Life as to Marriage, upon the day of the Marriage
all the aforesaid Legacies to fall to Each of the Legatees as afore mentioned, and my will & desire is that
my dearly beloved Wife Mary Mills & Thomas Joblin should be Executrix & Executor of this my Last Will
& Testament.
"I[n] witness whereof I hereunto set my hand & seal this Twenty Sixth day of September one thousand
Seven hundred & fifty five. William Mills {Seal}.
"Test. [ Witnesses] John Staples, Isham Davis, William Floyed, Charles Tuley, Robert Davis.110
COMMENT:
The 330 acres "unsettled," should be the 330 acres that were surveyed in 1750 and finally
patented to William just before his death; in 1770 the heir to these 330 acres, William Jr., sold
the tract saying he was a resident of NC. (See abstract under 1770 below.)
TO DO:
• Study all the witnesses; use them to help prove pre-Albemarle origins for William & Mary.
• Particularly explain why Thomas Jopling ["Joblin"] was chosen executor. Since no other Mills
was named to that post, the implication is that William had no Mills kin in the area other
than his heirs. Was Jopling an in-law? Various online trees identify Jopling's wife as
Catherine Farrar.
The following overview of Jopling records is pulled from published abstracts:
110 Amherst Co., VA, Will Book 1: 73–76 for will, administrator's bond, and inventory.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 6 JUNE 2016 • 22
SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
COMMENT:
Jopling [who declined to serve as executor when William Mills finally died in 1766] first appears
in Albemarle/Amherst deeds in 1750, amid the Roses and Davises who were neighbors of
William Mills. However, later deeds place his land on Green Creek, a site the deeds don't
associate with Mills, Watts, or Lavender.
• "10 Apr 1750 Ro. Rose, Clerk, to Jno. Parks, planter; rents and covenants – 100 acres, part of
3,700 acres pat. to Rose – during lives of Wm. Parks & John Parks, Jr. – to pay on 26 Dec each
year 436 pds. Tobacco. Wit: Matthew Davis, Gilbert Hay, Thos. Jopling, Philip Davis.111
• "9 March 1758, Thos. Jopling to Saml. Bailey for £10, 134 acres both sides of Green Creek
adj. grantor; Ralph Jopling. Wit: Jno. Peters, Nathan Bond, Lee Harris. [Also] 24 Dec 1757
Ralph Joplin to Jno. Cox for £50, 400 acres Green Creek, branches, adj. Col. Epes' Green Mt.
tr. Wit: Jno. Griffin, Rich. & Perrin Farrar. Katherine, wife of Ralph Joplin."112
• "20 Aug 1760 Jno. Wright, Orange, N.C. to Thos. Jopling for £100, 400 acres N side of
Rockfish; part of 800 acres bought from Col. Jno. Chiswell, adj. Alex. Montgomery,
Chiswell."113
• "4 April 1761 Thos. Jopling to David Enicks for £20, 400 acres, pat. 20 Aug. 1760, on head
branches Geady [Reedy?] and Briery Creeks, adj. his own line; Mary Upton, Jno. Snyder.
Witnesses: Wm. Cox, Robt. Johnson, Jno. Peter.114
• "1 Dec 1761 Thos. Jopling, AC, to John Roberts, AC, 25 pds. For 300 acres … North side of
South Fork of Rockfish. Lines: Widow Upton, Widow Johnson. Mark of Thos. Jopling. Wit:
Thomas Farrar, William Cox, James Jopling. Court held at Henry Key's 7 Dec 1761 … This first
courthouses was in what is now Nelson County."115
• "25 May 1763. John Robinson, King and Queen, to Thomas Jopling, AC, 22 pds. For 258
acres, S side of Rockfish and part of larger tract pat. to John Chiswell and now property of
Robinson. Lines: William Harris, on S side of Rockfish; James Montgomery, John
Montgomery. Wit: William Cabell, Jr., Cornelius Thomas, Joseph Cabell."116
• "3 October 1763. James Nevil, David Crawford, Cornelius Thomas, Thomas Jopling, &
Howard Cash, AC, [bond] of office … Nevil appointed Sheriff of Amherst … Marks of Jopling &
Cash." "4 Feb 1765 James Nevil, Thomas Jopling, Henry Key, & Geo. Seaton. … Nevil … is
hereby bonded to collect taxes."117
111 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 18; citing Albemarle Deed Book 1: 225.
112 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 32; citing Albemarle Deed Book 2: 32.
113 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 49; citing Albemarle Deed Book 3: 32.
114 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 49; citing Albemarle Deed Book 3: 52.
115 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 71; citing Amherst Deed Book A: 15.
116 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 77; citing Amherst Deed Book A: 120.
117 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 78, 85; citing Amherst Deed Book A: 142, 299.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 6 JUNE 2016 • 23
SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
• "3 Nov 1766. Jos. Upton, Alb[ermarle] to Thomas Jopling, AC, for 60 pds, 400 acres. Lines:
Bryary Branch. Wit: Geo. Seaton, Edmund Wilcox, Neill Campbell."118
• "4 July 1769. Thos. Jopling, AC, to
• Benj. Childers, AC, for love borne by Jopling for his son-in-law, Benj. Childers – 200 acres
S side of Rockfish. Lines: Col. Jno. Chiswell, Michael Montgomery, Josiah Jopling."
• His son Josiah Jopling, 530 acres N side and joining Rockfish."
• Jno. Griffin, his son-in-law, AC, 323 acres. Lines: Wm. Harris, Jas. Mountgomery, John
Mountgomery, Chiswell, Benj. Childers, S side of Rockfish."119
• 4 April 1774." Elliz. Cox – Book 1, Page 250 – Guardian Bond – Thos. Jopling and Jas. Nevil,
April 4, 1774, for Thos. Jopling as guardian of Eliz. Cox, orphan of Jno. Cox, deceased."120
• "2 Aug 1779. Ro. Davis & wife Jenny, AC (signed Jean) to Philip Thurmond, AC, for £2000,
375 acres both sides Wilderness Run. Lines: Ro. Davis, Jno. Floyd. Wit: Thos. Jopling,
Edmond Powell, Ro. Davis, Jr." Also, same to same, "90 acres on Davis's Spring Branch."
Same witnesses."121
• "6 Sep 1779. Wm. Loveday and wife Sarah, late of AC, to Wm. Cabell for £600, 200 acres
branch of Purgatory Swamp and branch of Joe's Creek below Fendley's Gap. Part of 400
acres pat. to Walter King 10 Apr 1751. Conveyed by King to Lunsford Lomax, the Elder, 1 Dec
1764 … Wit: Wm. Newton, Groves Harding, Thos. Jopling, Jas. Ward, Jno. Bibb, Abraham
Warwick."122
• "6 May 1782. Francis West & wife Eliz., AC, to Wm. Cabell, AC, for £15, 110 acres Mayo
Creek and pat. to West by Commonwealth on 20 Jul 1780. Lines: Moses Going. Wit: Jno.
Martin Jr., Abraham Warwick, Thos. Jopling.123
• "8 Oct 1787. Thos. Davis, Lincoln Co. – power of attorney to Thos. Jopling, AC to receive of
Thos. Upton, Albemarle, 1400 acres in Montgomery County – S side of the great Canaway
which my father Robt. Davis, bought of Jas. Mooney … my seven sisters: Nannah (Hannah?),
Abigale, Jane, Martha, Lucy, Ann & Polly Davis and … my two brothers, Robt. & Olander
Davis. Wit: Rich. Farrar, Michl. Thomas, Thos. Jopling, Sherrod Griffin. Orig. del. oo Jopling,
Sept. 1788."124
• "2 July 1787. Thos. Jopling, AC, to Jos. Smith, AC, for £40, 300 acres both sides Rockfish."
19 Jan 1789, Thomas Jopling, AC & wife Hannah, AC, to Wm. Ball of Albemarle, for £200,
118 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 99; citing Amherst Deed Book A: 179.
119 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979),107; citing Amherst Deed Book A: 323–25.
120 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Wills of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1865 (1985; reprint, Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1998), 82.
121 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979),184; citing Amherst Deed Book E: 157–59.
122 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979),185; citing Amherst Deed Book E: 174.
123 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 198; citing Amherst Deed Book 3: 334.
124 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 229; citing Amherst Deed Book R: 223.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
400 acres Briery Creek on S side and joining Rockfish River. Lines: Edwd. Harding, David
Enix, Thos. Farrar. Wit: Michl. Thomas, Gideon Crews, Michl. Thomas Jr., Ralph Thomas."125
• "5 Sept. 1785. Jas. Matthews, AC, to Thos. Jopling, AC, for £40, 92 acres head branch of S
fork Rockfish. Lines: Abraham Eades Jr. Pat. To grantor 15 Jun 1773."126
• "10 Aug 1789 Thos. Jopling … August 10, 1789, written: September 7, 1789, probated.
Witnesses: Henry Martin, Jos. Thomas, Thos. Farrar, Jno. Jopling. Executors: sons, Jas. and
Jos. and friend, Henry Martin, Ux, Hannah – Gladys Creek land; grandson, Jesse Jopling – if
without heirs; sons, Josiah and Jas. – Piney Mountain land bought of Jesse Martin; son,
Thomas.; Jno. Griffin who married my daughter Martha; my daughters: Ann Childers, Jane
Davis, Lucy Powell, Rebecca Martin, Hannah Allen. Book 2 (3?), Page 126 – Inventory –
December 1, 1789 – L 534-17-6."127
• "30 Oct 1806. Thos. Jopling, Bedford, to Jno. Harris, AC, for £600, 210 acres Buck Creek.
Lines: Jno. Diggs, Bennett Jopling, Henry Roberts, grantor. Wit: Jno. W. Harris, Asa Varnum,
Benj. Rucker, Jr., Wm. Lee Harris."128
COMMENT:
• Past 1785, the Thos. Jopling entries (only two of which are abstracted above) are clearly to a
younger Thomas.
• Curiously,
o Of the 30 or so appearances that Thomas Sr. makes in this set of deed abstracts, none
place him in the presence of William Mills, the man who appointed him executor of his
estate.
o The two men live in different parts of Albemarle/Amherst.
o They have almost no associates in common.
o He did have a grandson named Jesse—a not particularly common name given to a son by
William and Mary Mills—but that Jesse was also the grandson of Jesse Allen whose
daughter Alsey married a Jopling.129
o The probate of William's will also shows that Jopling declined to serve.
SO: Why would William Mills name Jopling to be a co-executor of his estate, together with
William's wife? The most common answer would be that he was a kinsman of Mary or was
married to a sister of William.
Note, under 1766 below, that Jopling declined to serve.
125 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 238; citing Amherst Deed Book E: 169, 380.
126 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 242; citing Amherst Deed Book F: 10.
127 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Wills of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1865 (1985; reprint, Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1998), 199;
citing Amherst Will Book 3: 116.
128 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 457; citing Amherst Deed Book K: 560.
129 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Wills of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1865 (1985; reprint, Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1998), 3.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
18 NOVEMBER 1755
CUMBERLAND COUNTY (FORMERLY GOOCHLAND)
Neighbor.
"Deed, Zachariah Terry, of Cumberland, to William Daniel, of Caroline, 200 acres in Cumberland, lying on
both sides of Randolph road, part of a tract formerly belonging to William Mills. Daniel Coleman a
witness."130
TO DO:
Work Cumberland County. Determine whether this land can be tied to William Sr. or Jr.
10 MARCH 1756
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Land grant.
In consideration of 35 shillings paid to the Receiver General of Revenues for the colony, a grant is hereby
made and confirmed unto Thomas Mills. 335 acres in Albemarle County "on the Branches of Pedlar
River bounded as follows:
"Beginning at a small white Oak in Robert Davis's line, running thence new line North eighty
degrees East one hundred and six? Poles to Pointers[,] South thirty five degrees East nineteen
Poles to Arthur Tuley's Corner, then on Tuley's Line South seventy five degrees East one
hundred Poles to Pointers in Edward Watts's line[,] and on the same South one hundred and
sixty six Poles to Pointers thence new lines South one and an half degree East fifty four Poles
crossing a Branch to Pointers[,] South sixty three degrees West one hundred and fifteen Poles to
Robert Davis's Corner at Pointers[,] thence on Davis's Line North seventy four degrees West forty
five Poles to Pointers North forty seven? Degrees West forty five Poles to Pointers[,] North
fifteen to Pointers thence North fifteen degrees East forty eight Poles to a white oak Saplin[,]
North nine … [rest of document seems to be missing in the record book]."131
COMMENT:
Thomas is said to be dead in the 1755 will of his father. His land, after the patent was received,
would not be sold. The abstracts that follow contain references to this land through 1770.
13 MARCH 1756
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Land grant.
In consideration of 35 shillings paid to the Receiver General of Revenues for the colony, a grant is hereby
made and confirmed unto William Mills 350 acres in Albemarle County "on the Branches of Buck Creek
130 W. B. Newman, "Captain William Daniel, of Middlesex: Some of His Descendants, and Other Daniels of Virginia," Tyler's Quarterly
Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15 (1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly
Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4 vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 1: 507.
131 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin
/GetLONN.pl?first=40&last=&g_p=P34&collection=LO_Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, Thomas, grantee … Albemarle County … 335
acres on the branches of Pedlar River"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 34, 1756–1765, p. 40 (Reel 33-34)."
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
of Pedlar River bounded as follows:
"Beginning at a Poplar and running thence With thirty five degrees east a leight [along?] Peter
Buck branch two Hundred and twelve poles to Pointers on Maple Creek[,] North sixty? Degrees
West at ten poles a branch at eighty six poles crossed it again to Edward Watts Junr. his corner
Maple[,] and with his Line South eighty four degrees west two hundred and twenty poles to
pointers a new Line[,] South forty degrees west forty eight poles to Pointers in Thomas Mills's
Line and with it South sixteen Poles [to] other Pointers[,] the same course continued on a new
Line[,] in all one Hundred and ninety two Poles to Pointers[,] and North eighty three degrees east
two hundred and sixty eight poles to the Beginning.132
COMMENT:
This William Mills should be William Sr. This should be the tract of land surveyed for him in 1750.
It was sold 1 September 1766 (just after William Sr.'s death) by his son Jesse, who appears to be
the only son who remained in Virginia.
JANUARY 1756
BEDFORD COUNTY, VA
Legal suit.
"Archibald Buchanan, John Brown and Co., Petitioners, against Thomas Leirwood and James Wheeler,
Defendant, on a Petition. This day came the Petitioners by their attorney, and the Defendant did not
appear. Therefore it is considered by the Court that the Petitioners recover against the Defendant, 3 £ 3
shillings and 5 pence and their costs and a lawyer's fee."133
COMMENT:
• Thomas Leirwood/Leerwood married Elizabeth Mills, daughter of William and Mary, between
26 September 1755 and 13 June 1757. (See entry below under that date.)
• I've not yet identified a family for James Wheeler, but he was in Bedford as early as 23
December 1754, in the neighborhood of the land grant Thomas Learwood sold to Moses
Helm. Note that Thomas, himself, was not assigned to this neighborhood road-crew list:
"Bedford County Court Book December 23, 1754: Moses Hellum, Wm: Moore, Thomas
Franklin, John Bollings Tiths, William Rutherford, James Murphy, James Wheeler, John
Gallaway, Archibald Campbell, James Machvenals, Edm: Fair, Nicholas Hays, Lewis
Franklin, Edmond Franklin, John Thompson, John Pleasants Tiths [John Pleasant's tithes],
Nathn: Paterson, Hugh Bowles and John Carson Ordered to work on the Road whereof
John Beard is Overseer."134
• Note below, under September 1757, that Thomas and wife Elizabeth would sell their Bedford
land to Moses Helm/Hellum.
132 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl
?first=696&last=&g_p=P32&collection=LO_Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, William, grantee … Albemarle County … 350 acres on the
branches of Buck Creek of Pedlar River"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 32, 1752–1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-715), p. 696 (Reel 30)."
133 TLC Genealogy, Bedford County, Virginia, Order Book 1, 1754–1761 (Miami Beach, FL: TLC Genealogy, 2000), 87; citing original p. 136.
134 Tymethief, "Life of Moses Helm, 1701–1781," Ancestry (http://mv.ancestry.com/viewer/7e829452-8873-46b0-bae5-4a4fd47d0dfb/
26805146/5037442581 : accessed 28 May 2016).
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
8 SEPTEMBER 1756
LUNENBURG COUNTY, VA
Court order.
"Jas Mills on attachment agst Jeremiah Moray dfdnt in debt; dfdnt's debt not fully recovered by public
sale attachment, further execution ordered."135
COMMENT:
James Mills is not named in the 1755 will of William Mills, Sr. No evidence suggests a
relationship but the possibility cannot be ruled out by the little evidence known up to this point.
13 JUNE 1757
LUNENBURG COUNTY
Land grant.
On payment of 15 shillings, grant made and confirmed unto Thomas Leerwood, 154 acres in Lunenburg
County "on the head branches of Reedy Creek by the north side of Pilot Mountain," bounded as
follows:
"Beginning at Wathen's Corner pointers on Beard's Old Path, thence new lines North sixty five
Degrees East one hundred and thirty four poles to a Hiccory, North eighty five Degrees East
seventy four poles to a Hiccory[,] North sixty five Degrees East thirty six poles to a white Oak[,]
North fifteen Degrees East thirty poles to a white Oak[,] South sixty five Degrees East one
hundred and twenty poles to three white Oaks[,] South twenty Degrees East forty four poles to a
Chesnut[,] South seventy five Degrees West seventy six poles to a white Oak[,] North eighty three
Degrees West thirty eight poles to a Hiccory[,] South seventy Degrees West eighty poles to a
white Oak[,] North eighty Degrees West one hundrd and forty poles to a white Oak[,] South
fifteen Degrees West forty poles to a Spanish Oak in Wathens line and thence along his line
North twenty eight Degrees West fifty four poles to the first Station." 136
COMMENT:
For Beard, see Learwood note under January 1756 above.
24 SEPTEMBER 1757
BEDFORD COUNTY, VA
Land Sale.
Thomas Leerwood and wife Elizabeth of Prince Edward County, to Moses Helm, 55? pounds, land on
headwaters of Reedy Creek, 154 acres. Signed Thomas (W his mark) Leerwood; Elizabeth (X her mark)
Leerwood. Witnesses: Nathaniel Patterson, Joseph McMurtray, James Patterson.137
135 June Banks Evans, Lunenburg County, Virginia: Order Book 24, 1755–57 (New Orleans, LA: Bryn Ffyliaiad Publication, 1998), 38; citing
Order Book 4:198
136 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first
=370&last=&g_p=P33&collection=LO Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, Willliam, grantee … Albemarle County … 854 acres on both
sides of Matrimony Creek"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756–1761 (v.1,2,3 & 4 p.1-1095), p. 370 (Reel 31-32)."
137 Bedford Co., VA, Deed Book 1: 139–41. Note that Ann Chilton's abstract (her p. 18) omits the difficult to read amount, as well as the fact
that Thomas and wife were of Prince Edward County.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
TO DO:
Work what's left of Prince Edward's records for Leerwood and associates.
SEPTEMBER 1757
BEDFORD COUNTY, VA
Land sale.
"A deed from Thomas Leerwood and Elizabeth, his wife, to Moses Helm was acknowledged by the said
Thomas Leerwood and Elizabeth his wife, and ordered to be recorded."138
COMMENT:
Elizabeth, wife of Thomas, was a sister of Ambrose Mills and Sarah (Mills) Watts.
13 DECEMBER 1759
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Neighbors.
"This indenture ... Between Thomas Smith of the Parish of St. Anns in County of Albemarle of one part
and John Tooley of the same County & Parish Witnesseth that Thomas Smith for sum of ten pounds
Currt. money of Virginia to him paid doth sell John Tooley & to his heirs one certain parcell of land
containing three hundred & fifty acres (be the same more or less) which sd parcell of land was granted
to the sd Thomas Smith by Patent at Williamsburg bearing date the twentieth day of March one
thousand seven hundred & fifty nine lying in the County of Albemarle on Pedlar River and bounded [as
follows:]
Beginning at pointers in William Mills's line & with his lines North & East to pointers[,] & North &
West crossing Maple Creek to Edward Watts's Junr. his corner Maple on the same[,] thence up
the Creek with his line according to its meanders to Stone's line & with the same South & East
cross Pedlar River to pointers by the River[,] thence down the same according to its meanders to
other pointers[,] thence South & West to a Sorrell Tree South & West crossing Pedlar River to
pointers[,] North & West to Maple Creek one hundred & four poles to Pointers[,] & North twenty
three degrees West ninety two poles to the Beginning .... [Signed] Thomas + Smith.
At a Court held for Albemarle County the thirteenth day of December 1759
This Indenture Memorandum & Receipt was acknowledged by Thos. Smith party thereto & ordered to
be recorded. Sarah Wife of the said Thomas personally appeared in Court & being first privately
examined as the Law directs Voluntarily relinquished her right of Dower to the Estate conveyed in the
said Indenture."139
COMMENT:
Thomas Smith witnessed the land sale of Thomas & Sarah (Watts) Mills in 1749. In the actual
deed [which I've also checked] three different samples of Smith's mark places it in a circle; the
published abstract, above, does not include the circle.
138 TLC Genealogy, Bedford County, Virginia, Order Book 1, 1754–1761 (Miami Beach, FL: TLC Genealogy, 2000), 134.
139 Ruth and Sam Sparacio, Albemarle County, Virginia, Deed Book, 1758–1761 (N.P.: The Antient Press, 1988.), 59; citing Deed Book 2:205–
6. (I've also viewed the actual deed to verify the details.)
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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13 DECEMBER 1759
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Neighbor.
"Thos. Smith & wife Sarah to Jno. Tooley for £10, 350 acres pat. 20 Mar 1759, on Pedlar, adj. Wm. Mills,
Maple Creek, Edwd. Watts, Jr."140
29 MARCH 1760
BEDFORD COUNTY, VA
Land grant.
On payment of 25 shillings, grant made and confirmed unto Thomas Learwood, 230 acres in Bedford
County "on west side of Elk Creek:
"Beginning at Waltons and Callaways corner red Oak on the said Creek, thence along their lines
West eighty Poles to William's corner white oak in the same, thence along his line North two
hundred and twenty four Poles to his corner white Oak in Kay's (Ray's? Key's?) line[,] thence
along his line North eighty Degrees East one hundred and fifty Poles to his corner two red Oaks
in Callaway's line, Thence along his line South ten Degrees East ninety four Poles to a red Oak[,]
South forty Degrees West forty Poles to a Pine, South fifty Degrees East sixty four Poles to the
Creek aforesaid, thence down the same as it Meanders to the first." 141
COMMENT:
• Thomas Learwood has sought out land next to George Walton, whose surname is alleged to
be that of Learwood's wife's mother.
The next several documents show that
• Ambrose Mills also bought land from George Walton.
• Learwood's grant apparently (but ambiguously) adjoined Ambrose's land, which he had by
that time sold to the Callaways.
1760
BEDFORD & HALIFAXCOUNTY, VA
Neighbor.
"7465 Joyce Summary 1760 Prince Edward.
Reedy Ck. William Moore of Bedford Co and Anna wife convey 190 ac of land to Moses Watkins of
Bedford, located on both sides of Reedy Ck in Bedford adj to George Walton, Thomas Learwood,
Thomas Franklin, and Bolling. Wit Robert Rutledge, William Bumpas and William Jamerson.142
140 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 41; citing Albemarle Deed Book 2: 205.
141 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl
?first=799&last=&g_p=P33&collection=LO Patent: downloaded 20 May 2016), "Learwood, Thomas, grantee … Bedford County … 230 acres on
west side of Elk Creek"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761 (v.1, 2, 3 & 4 p.1-1095), p.799 (Reel 31-32)."
142 Roberta J. Estes ([emailprotected]), "Re: Moore in Charlotte and Prince Edward Counties," 24 June 2007; posted at "Moore-L
Archives," RootsWeb (newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/MOORE/2007-06/1182731829 : accessed 23 May 2016. No citation of the source is
provided in this extensive list of abstracts focusing primarily on the Watkins family.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
(BEF0RE) 27 APRIL 1761
BEDFORD COUNTY, VA
Land sale.
"CALLAWAY, WILLIAM, Deed from William Callaway to Thomas Pullen, 204 acres for 23 Pounds
beginning at a white oak binding on the land Thomas Pullen bought of George Walton. (This being part
of 898 acres which Geo. Walton surveyed for Ambrose Mills, who later sold it to Wm. Callaway). Rec.
April 27, 1761. Pg. 430.143
COMMENT:
• By the 1790s, when Franklin County emerged from parts of old Bedford, the Callaways (and
Sanderfurs who also appear in this set of notes) were neighbors of our second Mills line, that
of William Mills (Y-DNA Witt) of Franklin County.
• William Callaway appears to be the county clerk. When the April 1761 term ended, the last
item reads: "Ordered that the Court be adjourned ... . Signed, William Callaway."144
1761
ALBEMARLE AMHERST COUNTY, VA
County creation.
Albemarle has been subdivided to create Amherst. The Mills land fell into Amherst.
5 MARCH 1764
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Witness:
"Gregory Mathews, Buckingham, to John Murrel, Albemarle, 25 pds. For 190 acres on Horse Shoe
Mountain and joining lands of John Hunter & William Burns. Pat. To Joseph Cabell, 20 Sep 1759. Wit:
William Tiller, Jesse Mills, Stephen Gee."145
COMMENT:
This is the first reference I've yet found to Jesse, who likely came of age about 1755–60.
10 JULY 1766
AMHERST COUNTY
Land grant.
On payment of 40 shillings, grant made and confirmed unto William Mills. 330 acres in Amherst County
"on the branches of Buck Branch of Pedlar River bounded as follows:
"Beginning at Pointers on Thomas Mills & running with his Line South sixty five Degrees West
one hundred and twelve poles to a Spanish oak[,] and with John Davis's Line South twelve
Degrees East one hundred and four [five?] poles to a pine[,] South twenty four Degrees East
forty four poles to pointers[,] thence on Isham Davis's South forty six Degrees East and hundred
143 Ann Chilton, Bedford Co., Va., Deed Book A-1, 1754–1762 (Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1987), 8.
144 TLC Genealogy, Bedford County, Virginia, Order Book 1, 1754–1761 (Miami Beach, FL: TLC Genealogy, 2000), 233.
145 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 79; citing Amherst Deed Book A: 162.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 6 JUNE 2016 • 31
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and seventy four poles to Pointers[,] East eighty eight Poles to a white oak North seventy seven
Degrees East one hundred and eighty poles to pointers[,] North eighteen Degrees West one
hundred and forty two poles to Pointers[,] South thirty nine? Degrees West eight eight poles to a
poplar[,] South eighty three Degrees West two hundred and twenty one poles to pointers[,] and
North one hundred and ninety two Poles to the beginning." 146
COMMENT:
This 330-acre tract appears to be the "unsettled" land that William Sr. bequeathed to William Jr.
in his 1755 will. The tract would be sold by William Jr. in 1770 (see below).
4 AUGUST 1766
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Will probate.
Will of William Mills, drafted 6 September 1755. "Witnesses: Jno. Staples, Isham Davis, Wm. Floyd, Chas.
Tuley, Ro. Davis of Albemarle … . Ux, Mary; son, Ambrose, at death of his mother; son, Wm.; my
daughters, Sarah Watts Mills [sic]; Eliz. Learwoods; Anna Mills; son, Jesse; daughter, Milly Mills; children
of my son, Thos.; Ambrose Jr.; and Eliz. Mills – son and daughter of my deceased son, Thos. Executors: ux
and Thos. Joblin."
"Administrator's Bond – Mary Mills, Jesse Mills, Wm. Lavinder, August 4, 1766, for Mary Mills.147
COMMENT:
"7 Sep 1772. Chas. Tuley, AC, to Stephen Goolsby, AC, for £100, 400 acres pat. To Arthur Tuley,
dec'd, 3 Nov 1750. Branch of Pedlar, Lines: Ro. Davis, Maple Creek, Edwd. Watts. Wit: Rich.
Peter, Jer. Taylor, Wm. Floyd. Elizabeth, wife of Tuley.
"13 Mar 1772. Thos. Morrison, AC, planter, to James Tuley Sr., Albemarle, for £50, 73 acres on
Long Meadow a branch of Rockfish. Lines: Col. Jno. Chiswell. Wit: Abner Witt, James Tuley Jr.,
Saml. Lackey, Francis New, Chas. Tuley.
"5 Sep 1772. Abner Will [Witt], AC, to Laurence Small, AC, for £100, 100 acres branch of Corbin
Creek. Lines: Jno. Lackey, Jas. Barnett. Wit: Chas. Witt, Jno. Witt Jr., Littleberry Witt.
"Abner Witt, AC, to John Witt Jr. & Sr., Deed of Trust – 5 sh. 200 acres. Lines: Jas. Barnett, Jno.
Reid, also slaves, furniture etc. Wit: Laurence Small, Chas. Witt, Chas. Barnerd, Littleberry Witt,
Wm. Small."148
1 SEPTEMBER 1766
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Land sale.
146 Library of Virginia, "Land Office Grants," database with images, Virginia Memory (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first
=942&last=&g_p=P36&collection=LO_Patent : downloaded 20 May 2016), "Mills, Willliam, grantee … Albemarle County … 330 acres on the
branches of Buck Branch of Pedlar River and on Dancing Creek"; citing "Land Office Patents No. 36, 1764–1767 (v. 1 & 2 p.557-1083), p. 942
(Reel 36)."
147 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Wills of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1865 (1985; reprint, Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1998), 242;
citing Book 1: 73 (will); Book 1: 75 (administrator's bond); 1: 104 (inventory).
148 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 141; citing Amherst Deed Book C: 392–98.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Jesse Mills, AC, to Nathaniel Davis, AC, for 40 pds., 350 acres branch of Buck Creek of Pedlar. Lines:
Maple Creek, Edward Watte, Jr., Thos. Mills." Lucy, wife of Jesse Mills, consents.149
COMMENT:
• This should be the tract mentioned in the 1759 sale by Thomas Smith to John Tooley, which
identified "William Mills" as adjacent landowner—i.e., the tract granted to William on 13
March 1756. Apparently Jesse is not selling the property as administrator of the estate but
as the heir to this tract, given that his wife participated in the sale.
• The fact that one boundary line is said to be shared with "Thos. Mills"—who has been dead
since about 1755—suggests that the family has held onto his land until his children reaches
adulthood.
27 FEBRUARY 1767
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Inventory
William Mills estate. £265-4-9, taken by Henry Key and Wm. Welton [likely Walton].150
TO DO:
Get this inventory and any other documents.
8 JULY 1767
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VA
Land sale.
"Mary Grymes, widow, Peyton Randolph, Esq.; Benj. Grymes; and John Robinson, Gent., Executors of
Phillip Grymes, dec'd; and Lunsford Lomax, the Younger, Caroline Co., to Jesse Mills, AC [Amherst Co.].
[Whereas] Lunsford Lomax, the Elder, Caroline, mtgd. [took a mortgage] on 7 Aug 1756, and rec. 21 Oct.
1756 in General Court – to secure loan to Lomax by Phililip Grymes, late of Middlesex, 7881 acres –
money not repaid – mutually agreed between Mary Grymes, widow, and executors that land be sold to
discharge debt and interest thereon – and they appointed Wm. Cabell, the Younger, atty, in AC Court –
Lunsford Lomax & wife, Judith, 13 Jan 1767, (Proved in AC) conveyed to Lunsford Lomax, the Younger,
[who now conveys for] 128 pds. 10 sh. [paid] by Jesse Mills – 396 acres, part of said tract and formerly
granted to Harmer, King, Randolph, & Lomax by order of Council Tye River. Lines Rose. Wit:
GeorgeSeaton, Wm. Walton, Jno. Ryan, Edmund Wilcox, Clerk."151
COMMENT:
• The 1766 –67 documents tell us that Jesse has chosen to leave the neighborhood of his
parents and relocate in a different community—selling his parental inheritanace on the
Pedlar and using the proceeds to buy land on the Tye.
149 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 100; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 128.
150 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Wills of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1865 (1985; reprint, Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1998), 242,
citing Book 1: 104.
151 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 100; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 203.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
• In 1770 (see below) the Grymes heirs sold another part of this land to Jesse's brother-inlaw
William Lavender, at which time the deed referred to the adjacent landowner as
"Mills," without a given name.
2 NOVEMBER 1767
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Surety on bond.
"Geo. Stovall Jr., Jas. Dillard, Wm. Walton, Gabl. Penn, Alex. Reid Jr., Alex. Reid, Jno. Ryan, Jacob Smith,
Jesse Mills, Ambrose Porter, Abraham Penn, Wm. Bibb, Jas. Christian, Wm. Floyd, Jos. Dillard, & Wm.
Loving bonded to King Geo. III for 1000 pds. for Geo. Stovall Jr. who was appointed sheriff by governor
under Colony seal on 17 Oct last past to perform duties of office. … Same men and date as above for
Stovall to collect fees. … Same men and date for Stovall – 500 pds – to collect all Quit Rents."152
5 SEPTEMBER 1768
AMHERST COUNTY, VA.
Land sale.
"Jesse Mills & wife, Lucy, AC, to Lucas Powell, Alb. Co., for 90 pds, 396 acres branch of Tye. Lines: Rose.
Wit: Jacob Smith, Wyatt Powell, Wm. Floyd."153
COMMENT:
This is the land that Jesse bought in 1767 from the Grymes estate, adjoining Grymes land that
Jesse's brother-in-law William Lavender would buy in 1770.
3 APRIL 1769
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Witness.
"Wm. Cabell, Sr., AC, to Wm. Cabell, Jr., AC, love borne by SR for JR, his son, fishery on Woods Island in
the Fluvanna – agreeable to reservations in deed from Wm. Cabell, the elder, to his son, Jno. Cabell, 13
April 1763; rec. in AC. Wit: Wm. Walton, Jno. Savage, Eleonar Mills (X).154
COMMENT:
No Eleonar (var. Eleanor, Ellender) Mills has been identified amid the Amherst Millses. William &
Mary (allegedly née Walton) did not have a daughter Eleonar. Their son Ambrose married
Mourning Stone and Ann Brown. Their son Jesse was married in this period to a "Lucy" (allegedly
Tilman). Their son William appears to have left the county, along with Ambrose. Their son
Thomas died leaving two young children by an unknown wife and land for which the patent was
received after his death and no sale of that land has been found on record. It seems possible
that Eleonar is widow of Thomas, holding her family together on Thomas's land.
152 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 103; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 261-62.
153 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 110; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 264.
154 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 115; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 431.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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17 APRIL 1770
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Land purchase.
"Grymes exrs. To Wm. Lavender – see p. 33 for details of Grymes – for £25, 546 ½ acres on branch of
Tye. Lines: Mills, Alco*ck, King. Wit: Zach. Taliaferro, Thos. Mitchell, Thos. Hawkins, Ambrose Jones, Geo.
Galasbey, Moses Campbell."155
COMMENT:
Three years earlier, the Grymes heirs sold part of their land on Tye River to Jesse Mills. (See 7
July 1767, above.)
On the same day as the Lavender sale above, Grymes's executors sold another tract of Grymes's
land on "a branch of Tye," The individuals named in that deed should fall into the neighborhood
of William Lavender and Jesse Mills.
"17 April 1770. Grymes Excrs. To Thos. Wilsher – see p. 33 for details of Grymes – for £8-
15, 174 acres on branch of Tye. Lines: Wilsher, Campbell, Edmonds. Wit: Zach.
Taliaferro, Rod. McCulloch, Thos. Reid, Rich. Tankersley Sr. & Jr.156
Contrary to the above note about "p. 33," neither p. 33 in this deed book nor p. 33 in the
published book of abstracts carry any "details of Grymes." Page 120 of these abstracts carries a
compiler's note with personal details on the Grymes family, but none superficially appears
relevant to the Mills-Lavender family.
COMMENT:
• Richard Tankersley (Sr. or Jr. unknown) is said to have married Mary Learwood [niece of
Wm. Lavender's wife Millie].157
• When William Lavender died, Richard Tankersley was one of the three men who inventoried
his estate. See 1776, below.
• Richard Tankersley of 1783 (presumably Richard Jr.) did have a wife Mary:
"1 Sep 1783. "Rich. Tankersley & wife Mary, AC, to Jas. Dillard, AC, one negro girl,
Watsey, and £20,000 tobacco to be delivered on James River in two deliveries. Also two
adj. tracts and where grantor lives. 1) 150 acres on N bank Tye. Lines: Jos. Dillard, Jos.
Mays. 2) 174 acres. Lines: Rose, Glasby, Dillard, a Stoney Hill. Orig. del. to Capt. James
Dillard 13 Jul 1797.158
• Richard Tankersley [Sr., wife Winneford] also bought land in 1767 on Piney, the same
waterway where Thomas Jefferson of Albemarle, 3 weeks later, would buy land from George
155 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 121 citing Amherst Deed Book C: 78.
156 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 121 citing Amherst Deed Book C: 76.
157 James Larwood, "Morphology of Larwood Genealogy" (MS, n.p., 1933); imaged at Ancestry.com from a copy at Sutro Library, San
Francisco, CA.
158 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 204; citing Amherst Deed Book E: 423.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Gillespie (Clasby), who would later serve as surety for Millie (Mills) Lavender. Details of the
Tankersly transaction:
"3 Feb 1767. Jas. Jones & wife Mary, AC, to Rich. Tankersey, AC, for 100 pds, 315 acres N
side of Tye and opposite mouth of Piney, part of larter [sic, should be "larger"] tract
granted by order of Council to Robt. Roles (sic, but Rose is meant), Clerk, and Thos. Chen
(Chew) and sold by Robt. Rose to Edward Manton & rec. in Alb. Wit: Henry Rose, Leonard
Tarrant Jr., Ambras Jones."159
• Richard Tankersley [Jr.] was a landowner by 1772:
"3 Aug 1772. Rich. Tankersley & wife Winneford, AC, to Stephen Watts, AC, for £55, 182
acres N side Tye & opposite mouth of Piney. Part of Rich. Tankersley Sr., land which he
gave to his son, Jr., and joins Chs. Rose. Wit: Hugh Rose, Augustin Wright, Thos.
Wortham.160 (On 4 Aug. 1777, Stephen Watts & wife Eliz. Sold this to Geo. Wortham. On
4 Aug. 1783, Geo. Wortham and wife Juday sold this land to Jas. Mays, with Rich.
Tankersley Jr. cited as adjacent neighbor. 161)
COMMENT:
This Stephen Watts remains unidentified. One family tree asserts him to be the son of Thomas
Watts and wife Sarah Mills, without evidence; but its information on that couple is radically off
base. It presents the couple as lifelong residents of Albemarle/Amherst, with two children
(Stephen and William) and no evidence other than derivative sources that are at least thirdhand.
162 For all known evidence on this couple, see E. S. Mills, "Thomas Watts (b. ca.1725; d.
ca.1796–1800); Spouse, Sarah Mills: Research Notes," report to file, 25 October 2015.
14 JUNE 1770
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Land sale.
"Jesse Mills, AC, to Thos. Lumpkin, AC, for £100, 297 bought by TL [sic, but it appears to mean JM] of
Lunsford Lomax Jr. and rec. in AC. Wit: Geo. Penn, Isaac Tinsley, Geo. McDaniel, Geo. Galaspie."163
5 OCTOBER 1770
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Land sale.
"Wm. Mills, North Carolina, to Jno. Lewis, AC, for £25, 330 acres branch of Buck Creek of Pedlar. Lines
159 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 98; citing Amherst Deed Book B: 170.
160 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 140; citing Amherst Deed Book C: 369. The wife of Richard Tankersly Sr. is also identified in Deed Book B:388,
according to Davis, p. 112.
161 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 169, citing Amherst Deed Book D: 444; and 204, citing Deed Book E: 422.
162 Sharons44, "Meredith Family Tree," user-contributed trees, Ancestry (http://person.ancestry.com/tree/70823236/person
/42487602640/facts : 1 June 2016).
163 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 127; citing Amherst Deed Book C: 178.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
Thos. Mills, Jno. Davis, Isham Davis. Wit: David Crawford, Alex. Reid Jr., Rich. Powell."164
COMMENT:
The seller is William Jr., son of William and Mary. The land was granted, ambiguously, to
"William Mills" in 1766, about the time of the death of William Sr., but it was surveyed for
William Sr. in 1750.
On 1 September 1766 his brother Jesse sold 350 acres adjoining Thomas and Edward Watts on
Buck Creek of Pedlar. (See that date above.) On 2 March 1772, another neighbor of William's
land, Jno. Tuley, would sell Nathaniel Davis a tract on Pedlar and Maple Creek, referencing the
old lines of Wm. Mills and Edward Watts Jr. (See below.)
5 JULY 1771
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Mortgage.
"Jesse Mills to Alex. Spiers, Jno. Bowman & Co., Deed of Trust – 5 sh. 297 acres which Mills bought of
Lunsford Lomax. Also one Va. Born negro wench named Phoebe; stock, tobacco. Wit: Thos. Jones, Jas.
Pendleton, Martin Bibb."165
COMMENT:
A deed of trust was a mortgage, not a sale.
20 SEPTEMBER 1771
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Mortgage.
"Jesse Mills to Thos. Mitchell, Factor for Jas. & Ro. Donalds & Co., Glasgow merchants – all household
furniture, stock and all book debts after paying Wm. Watson his demands vs. me. Memo: Trunk and
table mentioned in fifth line delivered in lieu of the whole. Wit: Edmd. Wilcox, Nathl. Tilman."166
8 OCTOBER 1771
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Mortgage.
"Jesse Mills, AC, to Edwd. Tilman, for £12, stock. Wit: Ann NBAS(?) JONES, Lede Jones."167
COMMENT:
• The garbled Jones name is likely a male Annenias.
164 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 123; Deed Book C: 118.
165 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 134; Deed Book C: 252.
166 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 134; Deed Book C: 254.
167 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 137; Deed Book C: 316.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
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SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
• Jesse's debt is seriously increasing. Having already mortgaged his land and household
furnishings, he is not mortgaging his livestock. In the next document below, he will mortage
his slaves.
7 MARCH 1772
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Mortgage.
"Jesse Mills Deed of Trust to Alex. Spiers, Jno. Bowman & Co., Dect [Debt] of £255-8-2 – 5 sh – one
negro girl, Letty, about 30; one boy Harry, about 12; other slaves, stock, tobacco-land on head of Tye –
200 acres. Wit: Geo. Walker, Jr., Geo. Weir, Thos. Wright, Thos. Reid."168
11 DECEMBER 1773
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Land Sale.
""Wm. Lavender & wife Mildred, AC, to Edmd. Wilcox, AC, for £100 546½ acres bought by Wm.
Lavender from exrs. of Philip Grymes & Lunsford Lomax, Jr., 17 April 1770. On branch of Tye. Lines: Mills,
Allco*ck, King. Wit: Patrick Hart, Benj. Taliaferro, Wm. Powell, Gabl. Penn, Aaron Campbell, Rich.
Alco*ck."169
COMMENT:
Jesse Mills, Mildred's brother, in 1767 bought Grymes land on a branch of the Tye.
JULY 1776
AMHERST COUNTY, VA
Probate.
Ambrose Mills, as "heir at law" of the estate of Wiliam Mills was summoned by the Amherst County
Court to appear and declare whether he would administer the estate of Mary Mills, dec'd.170
COMMENT:
An "heir at law" was a "forced heir," as opposed to being a legatee under a will. In colonial
Virginia, the heir at law of a landowner's real estate was the eldest son who, under
primogeniture, inherited all land unless the father left a will giving some tracts to other sons.
This implication that Ambrose was the eldest son—reinforced by the father's will that named
him first—helps to date the time frame of the parental marriage.
168 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 136; Deed Book C: 298.
169 Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia, 1761–1807 and Albemarle County, Virginia, 1748–1763 (Greenville, SC:
Southern Historical Press, 1979), 153; citing Amherst Deed Book D: 119.
170 Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Nicholas Mills of Hanover County," Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1833): 237–42; 15
(1933): 38–64; reprinted as Genealogies of Virginia Families; From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Gary Parks, ed. 4
vols. (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1981), 2: 700–1; citing Amherst Order Book 1773–82.
William Mills (ca. 1699–1766)
Spouse Mary (Walton?)
A WORK-IN-PROGRESS BY ELIZABETH SHOWN MILLS, CG, CGL, FASG • 6 JUNE 2016 • 38
SHARING POLICY: SEE LAST PAGE
This marks the end of the records found to date for William and Mary. For additional records
created by and about their offspring in Southside Virginia, see particuarly
• Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Ambrose Mills, Col. (ca. 1722–1780); Spouses 1. Mourning Stone, 2.
Ann Brown: Research Notes," 2 May 2016.
• Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Thomas Watts (ca. 1725–aft. 1796); Spouse Sarah Mills: Research
Notes," for all known records created by or about this couple in Virginia, South Carolina, and
Missisisppi.
• Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Mills: Literature Survey of Southside Virginia: Brunswick, Goochland,
and Counties Cut from Them—Principally Albemarle, Amherst, Cumberland, Bedford, and
Prince Edward," report to file, 28 May 2016.
• Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Watts: Literature Survey of Colonial & Revolutionary Bedford,
Brunswick, and Lunenburg Counties, Virginia," report to file, 5 January 2015.
• Elizabeth Shown Mills, "William Mills, Maj. (1746–1834); Spouse Eleanor Morris: Research
Notes," 1 July 2015.
SHARING POLICY
I am happy to share this file, as a PDF, with anyone who can use it. If you wish to extract a portion of it into your
own notes or correspondence, please place quotation marks around any material you extract and credit it as
follows:
Elizabeth Shown Mills, "William Mills (1699–1766), Spouse Mary Walton?: Research Notes," a working file updated 6
June 2016," p. ____.
If I have made an error in any abstract or transcription—or if my analyses prove invalid—you would not want to
be blamed for my errors. And I, as I continue to circulate this work, would be mortified if others thought I had
committed plagiarism because my words appear elsewhere without attribution.

Children of William Mills and Mary Walton? are:
13 i. Anna Mills, born in Goochland Co., VA?; died Abt. 1816 in Bedford Co., VA; married Lewis Witt Aft. 1755 in Amherst Co., VA?.
ii. William Henry Mills
iii. Thomas Mills, born Abt. 1721 in England; died Bef. 1755 in Virginia.
iv. Col. Ambrose Mills, born 1722 in Derbyshire, England; died 14 Sep 1780 in Biggerstaff's Farm, King's Mountain, Rutherford Co., NC; married (1) Mourning Stone Abt. 1750; born Abt. 1724 in near Williamsburg, James City Co., VA; died Abt. 1755 in "Pine Tree Hill, " Camden, SC; married (2) Anna Brown Abt. 1763; born in Chester, SC; died Abt. Jun 1805 in Rutherford Co., NC.
v. Sarah Mills, born Abt. 1725 in Virginia; died Aft. Mar 1767; married Edward Watts.
vi. Elizabeth Mills, born Abt. 1729.
vii. Amelia Mills, born Abt. 1735.
viii. Jesse Mills, born Abt. 1740 in Virginia; died Aft. Mar 1767 in Kentucky; married Lucy Tilman 06 Aug 1765 in Amherst Co., VA.

28. Benjamin Duvall, born 30 Oct 1717 in Prince Georges Co., MD; died Abt. 1792 in Franklin Co., VA. He was the son of 56. Mareen Duvall III and 57. Sarah Griffith. He married 29. Anne Griffith in Maryland.
29. Anne Griffith, born Abt. 1731 in Calvert Co., MD?; died Aft. 1792 in Franklin Co., VA. She was the daughter of 58. Samuel Griffith, Jr. and 59. Ann Skinner.

Notes for Benjamin Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

BENJAMIN DUVALL4
1717 - 1792

Benjamin Duvall, son of Mareen and Sarah Duvall, was born October 30, 1717, in Queen Anne's Parish, Prince Georges County. He married Anne Griffith, born about 1731, daughter of Samuel Griffith, of Calvert County, and the sister of Benjamin Griffith. The latter by his will, dated January 10, 1750/1, and proved in Calvert County on November 13, 1751, devised his sister, Bathsheba Griffith, all land during life and at her decease to her male heirs, but in the event that she left no male issue, then to "my sister Ann Duvall's son Lewis Duvall." To his nephew, Lewis Duvall, whom he styled cousin, he bequeathed his wearing apparel.1 Benjamin Duvall established his seat in St. John's and Rock Creek parishes, where the births of several children are recorded.

Children of Benjamin and Anne (Griffith) Duvall

1. Lewis Duvall, married Jemina ---. q.v.
2. Mareen Duvall, born 1764. q.v.
3. Clarke Skinner Duvall, born May 16, 1766.
4. Nancy Skinner Duvall, born Aug. 12, 1768, --- Robertson.
5. Ester Duvall married --- Eubanks.
6. Benjamin Skinner Duvall. q.v.

In 1758 he was seized of part of "Vale of Benjamin," a Stockett inheritance, and "Poplar Ridge," according to the Debt Books. His seat, however, after that date was in Rock Creek Parish, where the births of several children are recorded. At the census of St. John and Prince Georges (Rock Creek) Parishes in 1776, he was aged 59, his wife Anne was aged 45, and he had in his household the following: Mareen Duvall aged 12; Anne Duvall aged 10; Rosey Galihan aged 17; and Mary Bonifant aged 12. No slaves.2
In 1778 he subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance in Prince Georges County before Magistrate Thomas Clagett.3
Before the close of the Revolution he and his family removed to Virginia and settled in Bedford County where he with his sons, Mareen and Benjamin Skinner, appear in the 1783 tax list. In 1786 at the formation of Franklin County from portions of Henry and Bedford Counties, his plantations fell into the newly organized county.
In 1786 he drew up his will in the presence of John Ferguson, William Akers, Thomas Thomson, and William Ferguson, but it was not probated in Franklin County until February 1792.4
He bequeathed his son, Lewis Duvall, 5 shillings, and the like amount to his son, Benjamin Skinner Duvall, and the same to his daughter, Ester Eubanks. To Rebecky Mosely, no relationship stated, he willed one cow and calf. The land whereon he lived was devised to his son, Mareen Duvall, and the residue of the tract to his daughter, Nancy Skinner Robertson, who also received personalty. The residue of his estate real and personal was devised to his wife during life and at her death to his son, Mareen Duvall, whom he appointed executor.
The appraisem*nt of the personal estate as returned to the court was £34/12/-.4
__________
SOURCES: 1. Adm. Accts., Liber 27, folio 154; Wills, Liber 28, folio 224; 2. Brumbaugh's Md. Records, vol. 1, p. 9; 3. Brumbaugh's Md. Records, vol. 2, p. 264; 4. Wills, Liber 1, folios 72, 87, Franklin Courthouse, Rocky Mount, Va.

Children of Benjamin Duvall and Anne Griffith are:
i. Ester Duvall, married ? Eubanks.
ii. Lewis Duvall, born Abt. 1745 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died 1811 in Campbell Co., VA; married Jemima ?.

Notes for Lewis Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

LEWIS DUVALL5
174... - 18...

Lewis Duvall, son of Benjamin and Anne (Griffith) Duvall, was of sufficient age in 1750 to be bequeathed his uncle's wearing apparel. About 1770 he married Jemina ---, and the birth of their daugh­ter, Nancy, on October 27, 1772, is recorded in St. John's Parish register.
In 1778 he subscribed to the patriot's oath in Prince Georges Coun­ty before David Crawford.1 And it is believed that he was the Lewis Duvall who on March 13, 1782, received £25/17/- from the State for services rendered.2
He accompanied his parents to southwest Virginia and received 5 shillings by his father's will of 1792. As a resident of Franklin County, Virginia, on November 7, 1792, he sold to James Callaway Sr., of Bedford County, for £50 a tract of land lying on the north side of Pigg River and on Robertson's Branch. He signed the deed in the presence of Mareen Duvall, Thomas Crutcher, and James Callaway Jr.3
From the various migrations and the casual manner in which court records were kept in Virginia and North Carolina about that period, we are unable to obtain his complete genealogical history. Those Duvalls in southwest Virginia formed a definite unit which was allied with the Duvalls who moved southward to the mountain counties of North Carolina. While no documentary proof has been found for his children other than Nancy, the following two are hypothetically placed as his sons:

1. Archibald Duvall. q.v.
2. Mareen Duvall, born 1788, married Jane ---. q.v.
__________
SOURCES: 1. Brumbaugh's Md. Records, vol. 2, p. 272; 2. Archives of Maryland, vol. 48, p. 98; 3. Franklin Co. Deeds, Liber 2, folio 443, Rocky Mount, Va.

**********************************************************************************

Transcribed will of Lewis Duvall – November 11, 1811 – Campbell County, VA

In the name of God Amen, I, Lewis Duvall of the County of Campbell, being weak and sick in body, but in my perfect memory, and calling to mind the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death, do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following. That is to say, I first commend my soul to God who give it and my body to the dust from whence it came to be buried in a Christian-like manner at the discretion of my Executors hereafter mentioned as touching such worldly good as it hath pleased God to lend me, I do dispose of in manner and from following; First, it is my will and desire that all my just debts and funeral expenses be faithfully discharged, as soon as possible after my decease. Items I give and bequeath to my son, Elisha Duvall, one dark bay horse, one feather bed and furniture, one cow and calf, one bay mare and colt, which property my Elisha Duvall has received from my estate; Item 2nd, I give and bequeath to my son, Archibald Duvall, one sorrel mare, one feather bed and furniture, one black colt, seven pounds in specie, one black horse, and sorrel mare, which property my son , Archibald Duvall has received from my estate. Item 3rd, I give and bequeath to my sons, Benjamin Duvall, John Duvall, Mareen Duvall, Daniel Thomas and James Duvall, and my daughter, Sally Moore, my tract of land lying and being in the County of Campbell and on both sides of the Little Seneca Creek and containing three hundred and seventy acres more or less. All my stock of horses, cattle, hogs, and sheep, household furniture and my plantation tools and my two stills, it is my will and desire that all the above named property be sold for the best price that can be got for it, as soon as convenient after my decease, and all of the profits arising from the sales thereof to be equally divided among the before named Benjamin, John, Mareen, Daniel Thomas, and James Duvall, my sons, and my daughter, Sally Moore. I nominate and appoint my sons, Benjamin and Mareen Duvall my Executors of my estate after my decease. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this fifth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand and eight hundred and eleven.

Signed, sealed, and acknowledged , Lewis Duvall in the presence of John Organ, Benjamin Jones, and Thomas Jones; At a court held for Campbell County, November 11, 1811, the within last will and testament of Lewis Duvall was proved by the oaths of Benjamin Jones and Thomas Jones and ordered to be recorded, and on the motion of Mareen Duvall, one of the Executors in said will named who made oath thereto according to law leave is given him to administer on said decedent's estate giving security whereupon he together with Benjamin Jones and Henry Brown, his securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of fifteen thousand dollars conditioned according to law for the said executors due and faithful administration on the said decedents estate and performance of his will, liberty being preserved the other executor in said will named to join in the probate thereof when he shall think proper.

Ro. Alexander, C,C,C

14 iii. Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall, born Abt. 1750 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died Bef. Sep 1809 in Muhlenberg Co. , KY; married Elizabeth ? Bef. 1791.
iv. Mareen Duvall, born Abt. 1764 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died 1830 in Maury Co., TN; married Susannah Cannifax 02 Dec 1799 in Campbell Co., VA.

Notes for Mareen Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

MAREEN DUVALL5
1764 - 18...

Mareen Duvall, son of Benjamin and Anne (Griffith) Duvall, was born 1764 and baptized September 27, 1767, in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges County, Maryland. He accompanied his parents to southwest Virginia and in 1783 he was a tithable in Bedford County. By the will of his father in 1792 he was to inherit the home-plantation upon the death of his father's widow. He however waived his birth­right and migrated to Iredell County, North Carolina, sometime after 1800.
On January 12, 1802, he purchased from his brother, Benjamin Skinner Duvall, of Bedford County, for $520 a tract of 237 acres on the north side of the South Yadkin River. The deed, though recorded in Iredell County, was probably transacted in Bedford County, as the witnesses were Elisha Duvall, Lewis Duvall, and Benjamin Duvall- none of whom were land owners in Iredell County.1
The 1810 census for Iredell County shows him as the head of a family over 45 years of age, a female between the ages of 26 and 45, a male between 10 and 16, two males and two females all under the age of 10.
On December 5, 1811, he bought of John Coxe, of Iredell County, 20 acres of land on the north side of the South Yadkin River, beginning at Alderson's corner, which had been granted to John Laird on Octo­ber 10, 1783.2 On October 14, 1814, he sold 60 acres of the land, which had been purchased from Benjamin Skinner Duvall, to William Ellis and which extended along Duvall's Spring Branch to Beatis' Branch. He signed the deed of conveyance.3
On October 24, 1816, he purchased of Francis Locke 44 acres of land on the north side of the South Yadkin adjoining the land of George Allison and James Lazenby. The witnesses were Benjamin Duvall and Nacy Duvall.4
In 1820 he was named as a trusty friend of John Pierce and ap­pointed one of the executors of his will. According to the census for that year, he and his wife were over 45 years of age, and at home were three males between 16 and 26, one male between 16 and 18, two females between 10 and 16, and one female between 16 and 26. There were four slaves.
On October 16, 1823, he conveyed to Thomas Journey for |60o land on the north side of the South Yadkin River beginning at Allison's corner and running along Batye's Branch to Ellis Spring Branch, being 165 ½ acres of land granted to John Laird and con­veyed to Benjamin Skinner Duvall on October 3, 1799. On the same day he sold another tract of 44 ½ acres to Journey on the South Yadkin adjoining the land of George Allison.5
By these conveyances or disposal of his landed estate, it was ap­parent that he was preparing to settle elsewhere. By May 20, 1826, he was established in Maury County, Tennessee, when he became the mortgagee on the property of Archibald Duvall of Iredell County.6
__________
SOURCES: 1. Deeds, Liber D, folio 495; 2. Deeds, Liber H, folio 80; 3. Deeds, Liber H, folio 400; 4. Deeds, Liber J, folio 215; 5. Deeds, Liber L, folios 380, 385; 6. Deeds, Liber M, folio 706.

More About Mareen Duvall:
Residence 1: Aft. 1800, Settled in Iredell Co., NC.
Residence 2: Bef. 1826, Settled in Maury Co., TN.

v. Clarke Skinner Duvall, born 16 May 1766 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD.
vi. Nancy Skinner Duvall, born 12 Aug 1768 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died Aft. 1839 in Campbell Co., VA?; married William Robertson 19 Aug 1786 in Franklin Co., VA; born Abt. 1756 in Franklin Co., VA; died Abt. 1806 in Patrick Co., VA.

Generation No. 6

32. (probably) John Overstreet, died Bef. 1743 in King and Queen Co., VA. He was the son of 64. (probably) James Overstreet. He married 33. (possibly) Elizabeth ?.
33. (possibly) Elizabeth ?

Notes for (probably) John Overstreet:
Information copied and pasted from Rootsweb on Overstreets in Colonial Virginia:

***YORK COUNTY VA***

[Thomas/Mary]
Thomas Overstreet; dead 24 March 1693; son of John and
Sarah Overstreet; estate administration 25 June 1694 York
County; married Mary -----; her estate administration 24 January
1701 York County; children:
1. John Overstreet

1687 William Eaton vs. Thomas Overstreet; judgement granted
Eaton
1693 Major Lewis Burwell, executor of Colonel Nathaniel
Bacon, has order to attach estate of Thomas Overstreet,
deceased; 24 March 1692/3
1693 Samuel and Anne Padgett acknowledge deed of gift to
John Overstreet son of Thomas Overstreet; Anne
Cross, formerly wife of Samuel Padgett, did before her
marriage with said Abbott [sic] did out of good will...give
John Overstreet son of Thomas Overstreet deceased one
cow calf; witness William Sherwood, Francis Mallory; 9
November 1693
1694 Mary Overstreet, the widow of Thomas Overstreet, lately
deceased, having presented an inventory of her husband's
estate, upon her petition making humble suit t the Court
to consider her low and mean condition and withal having
a charge of children to allow her some small necessaries
out of the estate as her beds and furniture, her chest
wherein her wearing clothes are, together with a pot and
pan, a pale, two dishes, two trays, two stools and a pestle
towards the natural support of her self and poor children
as her paraphenalia, which is granted, who hath now
relinquished all her right and interest to all other matters
and things whatsoever belonging to the estate; 25 June
1694
1694 Major Lewis Burwell, the surviving executor of Nathaniel
Bacon Esq., on his petition hath order for commission of
administration of the estate of Thomas Overstreet as the
greatest creditor to the same, Mary, the decedent's widow,
having in Court relinquished all her right thereunto. Mr
Benjamin Harrison became Lewis Burwell's security; 25
June 1694
1694 John Sanders, John Rodes, Roberts Roberts to appraised
estate of Thomas Overstreet 10 July 1694; inventory
L.13.3.10; 19 July 1694

Thomas Overstreet; estate administered 1720 York County

1704 50 acres in 1704 quit rent rolls of York County [VMHB
31 (1923), p. 72]
1708 26 July 1708: "Thomas Overstreet this day appeared to
answer the presentment of the grand jury against him for
not coming to Church and alledged that he for a long
time since hath been so deaf he could not understand
what the parson said is therefore excused." [York County
Deeds, Wills, and Order Book 13 (1706-1710), p. 154]
1720 18 January 1720: "Joseph Walker came into this Court
and made oath that Thomas Overstreet departed this life
without making any will so far as he knows or believes,
and he having with Thomas Nelson his security entered
into and acknowledged their bond to the Court for his just
and faithful administration..." [York County Deed, Will,
and Order Book 15 (1716-1720), p. 537; bond, p. 538;
inventory returned 19 December 1720, p. 679; inventory,
pp. 681-682]

***CAROLINE COUNTY VA***

Thomas Overstreet

1749 Betty Coleman and Edward Wyatt vs estate of Thomas
Overstreet; judgement granted plaintiffs for eight pounds;
sheriff executed attachment of goods in hands of WIlliam
Stone and Shadrack Trible

***AMELIA COUNTY VA***

Thomas Overstreet of Amelia County VA
1. Susan Overstreet; married 25 January 1787 Amelia
County VA: William Wood

1760 witnessed deed of Charles Beasley of Halifax County to
James Overstreet of Amelia County VA 31 December
1760
---- Joel Hundley sold Thomas Overstreet land ND [21:71]
1763 Amelia County VA tax list; Nottoway Parish upper end
1764 Amelia County VA tax list; Nottoway Parish upper end
1766 Thomas Overstreet witnessed deed of John
Thomas/Bedford County VA to John Sharrott/Nottoway
Parish/Amelia County VA; 28 August 1766
1776 Thomas Overstreet (X) witnessed deed of John
Thomas/Bedford Parish/Bedford County VA to John
Sharrott/Nottoway Parish/Amelia County VA; 28 August
1776
1777 Joel Hundley/Amelia County VA sold Thomas
Overstreet/Amelia County VA 31 acres on both sides of
head of Peters Creek adjoining lines of Matthew Wallace,
William Woods, Marston Green; Catherine Hundley wife
of Joel Hundley relinquished dower; 28 September 1777
1785 Thomas Overstreet (X) witnessed deed of John
Beasley/Amelia County VA to Leonard Beasley/Amelia
County VA 23 February 1785

Thomas Overstreet; children:
x. Elizabeth Lewis Overstreet; married May 1800 Amelia
County VA: Parham Booker

1802 Deed of Trust: Parham Booker and Elizabeth Lewis
Booker, his wife, of Amelia County Va, first part; Benoni
Overstreet and Joshua Chaffin of Amelia County VA,
second part; and David Buchanan, James Dunlop, and
Robert Pollock, late merchants and partners of Petersburg
VA known by the name of Buchanan & Dunlop & Co.,
third part. Date 11 December 1802. Parham Booker and
Edmund Morton, late merchants and partner of Amelia
County VA, known and called by the firm name of
Booker and Morton, are indebted to the firm of
Buchanoan and Dunlop for 1500 pounds. They wish to
secure and pay this debt, and therefore convey slaves and
lands as follows: one tract of 111 3/4 acres in Amelia
County VA on the Appomattox River flrmerly alloted to
Parham Booker as his wife's portion of land allotted her
by her late father, Thomas P. Overton [recte Thomas P.
Overstreet. Also, one tract of 74 acres in Amelia County
VA adjacent lines of Bannister Bryan, John Morris, and
John Reason, which was conveyed to Parham Booker by
Sarah Booker. Also 13 negro slaves: two men named
James and Dick; four women named Mary, Pallas, Jenny,
and Amy; six boys named Daniel, Jemmy, Billy, Henry,
Jordan, and Beverly; and one girl named Laura. should
the debt not be paid by the due date, the land and slaves
may be sold at public auction, and the proceeds applied
against the debt. Witnesses Waller Ford, Charles
Craddock, and Edmund Booker as to P. Booker and B.
Overstreet; John Lampkins, Grey Feirly and ----- Cary as
to Chaffin; and Abel Farrar, George Scott, John Melaner
and Anthony Webster Sr as to James Dunlop; proven 28
April 1803

***CAMPBELL COUNTY VA***

Thomas Overstreet

1782 provided supplies to the Revolutionary forces [VMHB 36
(1928), p. 261]

More About (probably) John Overstreet:
Comment 1: Bet. 1692 - 1694, The connection of Maj. Lewis Burwell with the estate of a Thomas Overstreet suggests a connection to the Bedford family because Lewis Burwell Overstreet was a later name in the Bedford family.
Comment 2: The names Jeffrey, John, and Thomas were most common among the early York Co., VA Overstreets, but the name Jeffrey never appeared among those of the name in Caroline, Orange, or Bedford Co., VA. Thomas and John were also common among those Overstreets.
Event 1: Bet. 1756 - 1759, According to an unverified tradition, three brothers, James, John, and Thomas Overstreet, came from England to Virginia. If this is true, the years may have been incorrect because Thomas Overstreet, Jr. claimed he was born in Orange Co., VA 1744
Event 2: Aft. 1654, The name Jeffrey Overstreet, son of John and Sarah Overstreet, appeared in the York Co., VA records in connection with Geoffry (Jeoffry) Moore, probably his grandfather.
Event 3: 1692, Major Lewis Burwell, executor of Col. Nathaniel Bacon, ordered for an attachment against the estate of Thomas Overstreet for 52 pounds, 6 shillings, 8 pence sterling per bill.
Event 4: 25 Nov 1692, York Co., VA Tithes included Jeffrey Overstreet.
Event 5: Bet. 1693 - 1694, Samuel Padgett and wife Ann--deed of gift to John Overstreet, son of Thomas Overstreet deceased, of a stock of cattle.
Event 6: 1694, Will of a Thomas Overstreet in York Co., VA.
Event 7: 17 Apr 1694, Sale of estate of Elisha Stanton; purchasers included Jeffrey Overstreet.
Event 8: 25 Jun 1694, Bond of Lewis Burwell of Gloucester Co., VA as administrator of a Thomas Overstreet for 26 pounds, 7 shillings, 8 pence or 5277 pounds of tobacco; Benjamin Harrison security.
Event 9: 25 Jun 1694, Major Lewis Burwell, surviving executor of Nathaniel Bacon, ordered for commission of administration of the estate of Thomas Overstreet; referred to Thomas' widow Mary.
Event 10: 25 Jun 1694, Ordered that Mr. John Sanders, John Roads, and Robert Roberts meet at the house of Thomas Overstreet on Thursday, 10 July next and appraise the decedent's estate.
Event 11: 19 Jul 1694, Inventory of the estate of the late Thomas Overstreet, taken at the decedent's house; total valuation 13 pounds, 3 shillings, 10 pence; presented in Court 24 Aug 1694.
Event 12: 31 Aug 1696, Deed of gift unto John Overstreet, son of Jeffrey Overstreet, of one cow and calf, acknowledged by William Wade.
Event 13: 1697, Jeffrey Overstreet requested exemption from a levy due to being too disabled to support his family.
Event 14: 06 Sep 1699, A James Overstreet was transported by William Jones, Jr. into King & Queen Co., VA on patent
Event 15: 1701, Will of Mary Overstreet, York Co., VA
Event 16: 1703, A James Overstreet was transported by William Jones into King & Queen Co., VA on patent dated 23 Oct 1703
Event 17: 1704, A James Overstreet paid Quit Rent on 180 acres in King & Queen Co., VA.
Event 18: 1704, Jeffrey Overstreet and Thomas Overstreet paid Quit Rent on 50 acres each in York Co., VA.
Event 19: 1710, A John Overstreet left a will in York Co., VA.
Event 20: 1720, A Thomas Overstreet left a will in York Co., VA
Event 21: 10 Jul 1745, Ann Overstreet received a 393 acre land grant in Prince George Co., VA for 40 shillings.
Event 22: 1748, A James Overstreet was a resident of Middlesex Co., VA
Event 23: 1750, A John Overstreet was a resident of Caroline Co., VA
Event 24: 1751, James Overstreet was a resident of Amelia Co., VA
Event 25: Jul 1751, A Thomas Overstreet purchased some of the estate of John Lucas in Orange Co., VA. This is probably the same Thomas Overstreet who appears in Bedford County in the mid-1750's, since Thomas Overstreet, Jr. of Bedford stated he was born in Orange Co., VA 1744
Event 26: 1752, A John Overstreet was a resident of Caroline Co., VA (adjacent to Orange Co.); action of trespass on case of Benjamin Hubbard and Company against John Overstreet.
Event 27: 1757, A James Overstreet was a resident of Culpeper Co., VA (adjacent to Orange Co.); later on moved to Jessamine Co., KY
Event 28: 1757, A William Overstreet was a resident of Prince Edward Co., VA.
Event 29: 1763, A James Overstreet was granted 72 acres in Hanover Co., VA (close but not adjacent to Orange County)
Event 30: 31 May 1767, A James Overstreet married Frances Eubank in Goochland Co., VA. He is the same James Overstreet who later settled in the northside of Bedford Co., VA (no proven connection to the Thomas Overstreets of the Southside).
Event 31: 1780, John H. Overstreet and Benjamin Overstreet, sons of William Overstreet, listed as residents of Prince Edward Co., VA--likely connections of Thomas of Bedford because of similarity of family names.
Event 32: 1782, A James Overstreet was a resident of Goochland Co., VA
Event 33: 1782, Henry, James, and Thomas Overstreet were listed as residents of Louisa Co., VA (adjacent to Orange County)
Event 34: 1800, Tax List of Amelia Co., VA lists a Benoni Overstreet, an unusual name which suggests a likely connection to Thomas of Bedford since he had a grandson Benoni.
Event 35: 1800, Tax List of Charlotte Co., VA lists a William Overstreet

Children of (probably) Overstreet and (possibly) ? are:
i. (possibly) Gabriel Overstreet
ii. (possibly) John Overstreet, Jr.
iii. (possibly) Henry Overstreet
16 iv. Thomas Overstreet, born Abt. 1720 in King and Queen Co., VA?; died Abt. 1791 in Bedford Co., VA; married Agnes Stone? Bef. 1744 in Orange Co. or Caroline Co., VA?.

34. William Stone, born Abt. 1700 in Middlesex Co., VA?; died Abt. 1775 in Caroline Co. or Stafford Co., VA?. He was the son of 68. John Stone and 69. Mary O'Brissell. He married 35. Elizabeth Ann ?.
35. Elizabeth Ann ?

Children of William Stone and Elizabeth ? are:
17 i. Agnes Stone?, died Aft. 1791 in Bedford Co., VA?; married Thomas Overstreet Bef. 1744 in Orange Co. or Caroline Co., VA?.
ii. Eusebius Stone, born Abt. 1732; died Abt. 1798; married Susannah Ballard.

Notes for Eusebius Stone:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Stone-1692

Biography
Eusebius Stone was born circa 1732, in Virginia.

Circa 1750, Eusebius married Susannah Ballard. Eusebius and Susannah moved to Bedford County, Virginia, in 1753, shortly after their marriage.[1]

Eusebius died circa 1798, in Virginia.

Military Service
French and Indian War
1755 After Braddock's defeat Dinwiddie rushed the militia to the frontier to hold back the French and to check the rampaging Indians. The Caroline unit under the command of Wm Woodford, s/o the Co.'s first sheriff, Wm Woodford, drew an assignment in Frederick Co, which at the time extended to a boundless western frontier. Here they built and garrisoned a stronghold called Ft. Mindenhall. Anthony Thornton, James Taylor Jr, James Taylor, the younger, Eusabious Stone and Benj Robinson Jr were junior officers and Woodford's lieutenants in the command. [2]

Research Notes
Note N00187
Of great importance to the early Stone family was the name Eusebius which was spelled in hundreds of different ways. The men who had Eusebius for a first name were usually called by such shortened forms as Sabe or Seb. The name Eusebius is pronounced correctly by pronouncing the following four english words in succesion: you, see, be, us. However it may be spelled in the records, the spelling
Eusebius is correct.
The name Eusebius comes from the great church historian and bishop who is commonly called Eusebius of Caesarea. He was born in Palestine in the city of Caesarea about the year A.D. 260 and lived until 339. As a young man in Caesarea he was taught by Pamphilus who had established a school of theology and a large library there. In 314 Eusebius was consecrated Bishop of Caesarea. He was a friend of Constantine who was the first Roman emperor to become a christian. Eusebius with Emperor Constantine presided over the Council of Nicaea in the year A.D. 325.
Eusebius is most generally known as the author of THE ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY which was a history of Christianity up to his own time.[3]
possible birth location: Lunenburg, Virginia
1756 Oct 23 (SOURCE: WASHINGTON PAPERS, National Archives) Col. George Washington sends letter to Captain Eusebius Stone pertaining to the building of Fort Loudon in Winchester. The full text of the letter follows:

Winchester, Saturday 23d October, 1756.

It is Colonel Washington's positive orders to the Officer of the Day—to Captain Stone,1 and all overseers of the public works, not to suffer any man to straggle from his work, on any pretence whatever; as they are constantly running about the Streets, when they shou'd be employed. Therefore no man is to be seen in town without a ticket in writing from his overseer, setting forth the reasons of his being absent: It is likewise expected the overseers will be more circ*mspect in staying with the men, and not leave their stations, until the hours allotted for their refreshment, as they shall answer for the same.

The men are to be acquainted, that if any is found acting contrary to these orders, he will immediately be sent up to the Fort, and punished—It is likewise recommended to all officers on duty, to examine every straggling Soldier they see in town without proper permits—that they do directly put the above orders into execution.

The Drummers to take the Guard to-morrow as usual; and no man to be excused from work on any pretence, except by the Doctor. And those who stay not in the Hospital, are to be brought before the Doctor at Breakfast time, by a Sergeant or Corporal of each company; that he may pass his opinion of their capacity to work. Any Sergeant or Corporal, found screening any person on any pretence, and acting contrary to the above orders, will not only be reduced, but also punished.

The Colonel having indulged them hitherto, is resolved not to forgive such evil practices for the future.

LB, DLC:GW.

1. On 2 Sept. 1756 GW paid Maj. Joseph Stevens "in full Capt. Stone" £20 6d. (Va. Regimental Accounts, 1755–58, DLC:GW). Eusebius Stone was an officer in the Caroline Co. militia, of which Stevens was the major. After Stevens left for home about 1 Sept., Stone evidently remained behind at least for a few weeks to continue work on Fort Loudoun.

DNA
Paternal relationship is confirmed through Y-chromosome DNA testing. Bo Stone FTDNA kit #838135, and his 6th cousin twice removed, a son of Orbie Stone, FTDNA kit #444533, match at a Genetic Distance of 1 on 37 markers thereby confirming their direct paternal lines back to their MRCA John Stone. FTDNA indicates that the probability the two share a common ancestor within the last 7 generations is 95.73% and within the last 8 generations is 97.28%.

Additional DNA Information
R1b1a2 Hap'group- H

Group #11-A
Test results received. Kit #22508
Haplogroup: R-L48 (confirmed)

Family Data
EUSEBIOUS STONE, b. abt. 1732, Lunenburg Co., VA; d. 1798, Patrick Co., VA.
Susannah Ballard (wife), b. abt. 1730, Caroline Co., VA; m. abt. 1752.
Children:

STEPHEN STONE, b. 1772, Henry Co., VA; d. 1835, Henry Co., VA; m. Bathsheba Hurt.
RICHARD STONE
EUSEBIOUS STONE, b. 1755, VA.
MILLY STONE
JOHN STONE
MICAJAH STONE
Sources
? Stone; FTDNA
? Campbell, T. E. Colonial Caroline, A History of Caroline Co VA. Richmond, VA: Dietz Press, Inc., 1989 (149-150).
? John Stone and Mary O'Brissell; Balcro.com
See also:

FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch.org profile: Eucebious Stone; free-use site, login required to view profile and source documents; profile created through membership collaboration; date accessed: 23 Jun 2019
"Find A Grave Index," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QVLG-3T6X : 13 December 2015), Eusebious Stone, 1798; Burial, , , ,, Unknown; citing record ID 106344747, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

Findagrave.com
Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 March 2018), memorial page for Eusebious Stone, Sr (1732–8 Nov 1798), Find A Grave Memorial no. 106344747, ; Maintained by Rebecca Prillaman (contributor 47326376) Unknown. Find A Grave: Memorial #106344747 ; date accessed: 23 Jun 2019

Acknowledgments
WikiTree profile Stone-1692 was created by Cardwell-95 through the import of MarilynCardwellGedcomJuly2011.ged on 10 Jul 2011.
WikiTree profile Stone-2164 was created by Cash-243 through the import of Cash Family Tree.ged on 8 Oct 2011.
WikiTree profiles Stone-2809 and Stone-2966 were created by Stroud-316 through the import of mom_2012-08-01.ged and taylor gedcom.ged on 2 Aug 2012 and 7 Sep 2012, respectively.
Additional Evidence for Children and Grandchildren of Eusebius Stone
Abstracts of Chancery Suits, Henry County, Virginia: Family of Eusebius Stone and Susannah Ballard, transcribed by Laurie Stone February 2020.

Originals available at Library of Virginia (Virginia Memory, Chancery Records).

https://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/full_case_detail.asp?CFN=089-1848-003#img

George Turner, executor of Stephen Stone, dec'd and the said George Turner and Milley (Stone) his wife, Joseph Nunn and Mary (Stone) his wife, Littleberry Stone, George Keenum and Elizabeth (Stone) his wife, and Barsheba Stone the widow and relict of Stephen Stone dec'd of the County of Henry. That Stephen Stone, the father of your oratrices and Orator, Milley, Mary, Littleberry, and Elizabeth and the husband of your oratrice Barsheba departed this life sometime in the year ____ having first duly published and declared his last will and testament which has been regularly admitted to probate in the County Court of Henry, that among other things contained in the said will the said Testator devises to your Oratrice Barsheba his widow a certain part of his lands designated by meets and bounds for life remainder to your Orator and Oratrices in fee, he directs his executors to sell his real and personal estate and distribute the proceeds arising from the sale thereof among those of your Oratrices and Orator who are his children all of which may more fully and at large appear by referring to a copy of the said will herewith filed exhibited marked A and prayed to be deemed and taken as part of this Bill.

Your Orator and Oratrices further represent that your Orator George Turner qualified as the executor of the said Stephen Stone dec'd and in that character took possession of his estate both real and personal, and in attempting to execute the said will according to the intention of the testator, he feels greatly embarrassed, and unable to proceed, on account of the defective executions of the contracts made by his testator in his lifetime with others for the real estate mentioned in the will aforesaid for remedy thereof your orator and oratric now humbly ask the aid of your honorable court.

Your Orator and Oratrices expressly charge that sometime in the year ____ a certain Eusebius Stone departed this life intestate seized and possessed of a valuable real estate lying in the County of Henry on the waters of the Smiths River consisting of two tracts of land one containing one hundred acres, and the other containing one hundred and ninety acres making an aggregate of two hundred and ninety acres as may more fully and at large appear by referring to two …. Deeds regularly admitted to probate in the County Court of Henry the bond(?) executed by Alexander Hunter to the said Eusebius and the other by a certain Thomas Nunn marked B. C. herewith….

Your Orator and Oratrice expressly charge that Milly Stone who intermarried with Lewis Franklin of Henry County, a daughter, Eusebius Stone of Patrick, a son, and Lewis Stone, John Stone, Stephen Stone, Milly Burnett, Nancy Franklin, the wife of John Franklin and Tandy Stone children of Richard Stone dec'd who was likewise a son, and William Stone, Eusebius Stone, John Stone, Micajah Stone dec'd, Jeremiah Stone, James Stone, and Richard Stone children of Micajah Stone dec'd who was likewise a son, and David Stone, William Stone, Maryann Stone the wife of Thomas Stone, Edward Stone and John C. Stone the children of John Stone dec'd who was likewise a son, and Thomas Stone, Susannah Stone the wife of John Stone the children of William Stone dec'd who was likewise a son, and David Stone (poss. Daniel) the child of Jeremiah Stone dec'd who was likewise a son of the said Eusebius Stone dec'd and who are hereinafter called Defendants.

..ln that Milly Burnett, John Franklin and Nancy his wife, William Stone, Eusebius Stone, John Stone, Micajah Stone, Jeremiah Stone, James Stone, Richard Stone, David Stone, William Stone, Thomas Stone and Maryann his wife, Edward Stone, John C. Stone, Thomas Stone and David/Daniel Stone have removed themselves without the limits of this commonwealth to parts foreign to your orator and oratrice wholy unknown….

https://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/full_case_detail.asp?CFN=089-1821-002#img

To the Court of Henry County, Bill of Complaint of Thomas Stone and John Stone and his wife Susannah, late Susannah Stone, heirs and distributees of William Stone dec'd… complaining that some time in the year 1798 Usebias Stone, the grandfather of the plaintiffs departed this life intestate possessed of a considerable estate by operation of law, your orator and oratrixare entitled to one eighth part that being the part of William Stone the father of your orator Thomas and oratrix Susannah who departed this life in the lifetime of Usebius Stone the father of the said William and grandfather of your orator and oratrix… that on the __ day of ___ in the year 179_, Susannah Stone the widow of the said Usebius Stone came into court and with Richard Stone, Stephen Stone, John Stone, Micajah Stone, Jeremiah Stone, Lewis Franklin and Usebius Stone her securities entered into bond as the law directs and she obtained letter of administration of all the personal estate of the aforesaid Usebias Stone dec'd very little if any of which estate consumed in the payment of debts and the real estate of which the aforesaid Usebius died seized has since been sold by what authority your orator and oratrix know not….. …in the division of the estate of Usebias Stone dec'd your orator and oratrix received no part, and they further pray that Susannah Stone admin, as aforesaid may be compelled to state what was the amount of sales of the personal estate of Usebias Stone dec'd and further to pay your orator and oratrix one eighth part of the same, and that Susannah Stone widow and administrator, Richard Stone, Stephen Stone, John Stone, Micajah Stone, Jeremiah Stone, Lewis Franklin and Usebias Stone may be compelled to answer this Bill and state what the real estate of the said Usebius Stone dec'd sold for and account for and pay to your orators Thomas and John, one eighth part thereof and their costs in the prosecution of this suit…. Deposition of Richard Stone states that he believes 7 children of Usebius were living when Usebius died, and that William (his 8th child) had predeceased Usebius. He doesn't remember the amount received for the land that was sold, but believes it to be about 400 pounds.

iii. Jeremiah Stone
iv. Manoah Stone
v. Stephen Stone

36. James Turner, born Abt. 1700 in Caroline Co., VA?; died Abt. 1793 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 72. Richard Turner. He married 37. Mary Admire?.
37. Mary Admire?

Notes for James Turner:
The following is quoted from page 273 of Volume I of "Bedford Villages: Lost and Found," and was contributed by Rachel Bishop. This was part of the section on the Davis Mills community, the vicinity of Bedford County about ten miles south of the City of Bedford where Route 122 crosses Goose Creek.

There is an old farm on Goose Creek, starting at Goose Creek bridge, on Route 122 and following the creek north about a mile. At one time it extended north along what is now Route 122 and crossing Route 24 to Mob Creek.

James Turner was the first tenant and was here before 1761 as he made his will leaving the tracts of land to his children. He died in 1793 and left to his son, Admire, "250 acres of land whereon I now live. He is not to enter or take possession of this land until the decease of myself and my wife" (Deed Book 1, page 388).

Admire died in 1818...

Other families have lived on this James Turner farm. The entrance to the private road is on Route 122 a little north of Goose Creek bridge. There were no bridges then and this was a stagecoach route which followed the creek a little closer than the road does today. From the entrance going north to the house is about a mile. ...

The following is quoted from http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=monkeys&id=I13370
Janet Ariciu family Bush

"The 18th Century Turners of Bedford County, Virginia The earliest record of the Turner family in Bedford County, Virginia is 27 May 1754. James Turner and others are granted leave to clear a road from Goos(sic) Creek down to falling mountains. By December of the same year, both James and Richard Turner are serving as jurors in Bedford County. In January 1755, James Turner Jr. is granted a deed of memorial by John and Eliza Eckols. In February 1755, John Turner serves on a jury. In March 1756, Ezekiel Turner makes his first appearance in the court records in a group of men clearing a road. Ezekiel does not appear in court records thereafter. Initially, Richard Turner associated with the Quaker faith. In 1757, by petition of John Eccles and other letters, seven Quakers were appointed to visit the frontier community near Goose Creek and ascertain the wisdom of setting up a Monthly Meeting. In April of 1757, this group breakfasted at the home of Richard Turner. They boarded at the home of Peter Holland. (see footnote 1). The South River Monthly Meeting was established. Richard Turner was the first clerk of the Goose Creek Meeting. Mary Turner, the wife of James Turner Sr. was received into the South River Monthly Meeting in December 1757. However, Richard Turner and John Hampton (see footnote 1) quickly fell into disfavor. A certificate against them was recorded. In July 1764, Richard was disowned for "having betaking himself to the vain fashion and customs of the World." And there ended the Turner connection with Quaker records. As young men come of age, they can be seen in the court records. Following are the first appearance of Turner males in Bedford Co., Virginia Court of Common Pleas. As noted above, John Turner appears in 1755. There appears to be two John Turners by 1787. In 1794, there appears John Turner Sr and Jr in the tax lists of Bedford County. Elijah (aka Elisha) Turner appears in November 1759. His wife, Sarah, is identified in August 1775. Ben Turner first appears as a juror in June 1761. Nathan Turner first appears in March 1762. He is married by August 1769 when his wife is mentioned. Admiah (aka Admire) Turner is first mentioned in August 1768. He appears on all tax lists 1782 through 1795. Admire is the administrator of the estate of James Turner in June 1793. Andrew Turner first appears in July 1764 as a juror. He appears regularly through Mar 1778. Isaiah (aka Isaak) Turner appears in September 1769 when he is sworn in as a constable. He clears a road with Admire Turner and James Turner Sr. in 1772. He pays tax for 1782 and 1783. Jesse Turner appears in November 1777 when his estate is probated. James Turner is the administrator. Jesse had two children, James and Ann Turner who chose David Wright as guardian. Lewis Turner appears on the tax lists of Bedford County 1781-1791. He was also an ensign in the militia and a militia officer in the 10th Regiment. Stephen Turner appears on the tax lists for 1783 to 1794. Thereafter, he is listed on the tax lists of Lincoln County, Kentucky. Martin Turner first appears on the tax list in 1792. Although the Turners appear frequently in the Court of Common Pleas, the records give little family data. Eighteenth Century marriages of Turners in Bedford County, Virginia show as follows: Mary Turner married Augustine Leftwich Jr. 12 Feb 1765 Mary is the daughter of Richard Turner. Nancy Turner married David Wright 8 Nov 1770 Nancy is the widow of Richard Turner. James Turner married Sally Leftwich 24 Aug 1778. She is the daughter of Major Leftwich. Stephen Turner married Mary Roundtree 26 July 1782. She is the daughter of Dudley Roundtree. Josiah Turner married Milly Key 26 Nov 1783. George Key was surety. Rhoda Turner married Farthing Hix 20 Mar 1784 She is the daughter of Isaiah Turner. Tabitha Turner married Henry Haynes 17 May 1784. Elijah Turner is the surety. Sally Turner married Drury Holland 26 Dec 1785. Sally is the daughter of Elijah Turner. William Turner married Betsey Hix 23 Jan 1788. She is the daughter of John Hix. Mary Ann Turner married John Stratton 29 Jan 1788. Admire Turner was surety. Benjamin Turner married Elizabeth Shrewsbury 8 Nov 1791. She is the daughter of Elizabeth. Richard Turner married Rachel Ayers 11 Dec 1792. They had consent of James Ayres. Wilson Turner married Elizabeth Doss 12 April 1796. Azariah Doss was surety. Nancy Turner married Moses Mayhew 27 Dec 1796. John Gordon was surety. Milly Turner married James Leftwich 2 Aug 1797. Consent of Admire Turner and Augustine Leftwich. Stockley Turner married Patsey Holt 25 Sep 1799. Patsey is the daughter of Lucy Holt. Theodosia Turner married John Murphy Jr. 30 Dec 1799 Theodosia was daughter of Elijah Turner. In the book, Leftwich-Turner Families of Virginia, part of the Turner family are detailed. The author identifies James Turner as the patriarch and lists his children: 1. Ruth Turner married Moses Hurt. His Bedford County will dated Feb 1802 lists heirs: Wife, Ruth; sons, James, Elisha, Nathan, William and Littlebury Hurt; daughters, Mary Hurt and Apphire and Bethsheba Stone. 2. Mary Turner married John Hampton. 3. Isaiah Turner 4. Admire Turner's Bedford County will dated Aug 1818 names wife, Sally; daughters, Lucy and Frances Chewning, Mary Ann Stratton, Milly Leftwich, Sally Grigsby; sons, Benjamin, Lewis, Admire, George and Jubal. 5. Elijah Turner Sr. left a Bedford County, Virginia will 15 May 1820. Mentioned were his wife, Sarah; daughter, Tabitha Haynes, Sally Holland, Dosha Murphy, Rebecca Ore and sons, Richard, Elijah, Wilson, Jesse and Meador. 6. Nathan Turner 7. James Turner 8. Richard Turner married Nancy Johns. From land records in Bedford County, it is apparent that Nathan Turner was married to Agnes. The will of John Phelps in Apr 1772 names "my daughter Aggey and her heirs". The heirs in this will also include John Phelps, James Turner Junior and Nathan Turner. Richard Turner, listed as child no. 8 in the book, was probably the oldest son. He was born about 1730 and died in 1769. He married Nancy Johnson about 1757. Richard was still associated with the Quakers at this time. His marriage did not appear in the South River MM. It may yet be located in another Monthly Meeting record. Their children were: 1. Mary Turner married Augustine Leftwich Jr. 2. James Turner (1759-1828) married Sally Leftwich. 3. Jesse Turner 4. Prudence Turner married James Wright. 5. Ann Turner married Joel Leftwich. The book, Leftwich-Turner Families of Virginia gives additional information on the descendants of Richard Turner. Other sources for information on this family include the Ancestral File and the International Genealogical Index. These are available through the Family History Centers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Caution is advised. Compare dates on the Ancestral File against appearances of the same individuals in primary source records. It is hoped that readers will share their sources and information on the Bedford County, Virginia Turners. Despite the wealth of Turner appearances in the primary records, little of it documents relationship. There remains much work to be done. The earliest mention of any TURNER in my Bedford Co. VA collection is to JAMES TURNER named in a suit re Talbot vs. Hawkins, January of 1755. James Turner was on jury to decide to whom damages should be awarded, etc. That is from (Court) Order Book 1 of Bedford. (I assume a man on jury 1755 was born by 1733 or so) The other Turner names which appear to 1761 are Ben, Elijah, Elisha, James, James Jr., John, and Richard. James & Richard also appear in the first Deed Book for Bedford ca 1761. Several other Turner names also. No Joseph I could find. Considering Bedford wasn't formed until 1754 you might want to place queries in Albemarle, Brunswick, Halifax, & Lunenburg counties - any of which might have been home to your clan of Turners before Bedford due to county formations &/or migration. There are three James Turners in 18th Century Bedford Co., Va. James Turner Sr. and his male children (including James Turner Jr.) all are in the Southern District of the Bedford Co., Va Real Property Tax Rolls. And they remain in the Southern District at least through 1813. In 1787, when each of the two tax districts have separate lists, the third James Turner appears in the Northern District. With the exception of Stephen Turner who appears on the real property tax lists in the Northern District in 1793, there is no other Turner appearing in the Northern Tax District from the inception of the district lists (1787) through 1813(the end of this microfilm reel) This James Turner consistenly holds 400 acres of land on the Little Otter River from 1782(when the tax lists begin through 1813 - when the reel ends)

More About James Turner:
Date born 2: Abt. 1700
Date born 3: Abt. 1705, King William Co., VA
Died 2: 03 Jun 1793, Bedford Co., VA
Residence: Bef. 1761, Living in Bedford Co., VA

More About Mary Admire?:
Name 2: Mary Admire

Children of James Turner and Mary Admire? are:
i. Isaiah Turner, married Frances ?.
ii. Mary Turner, married John Hampton.
iii. Nathan Turner, married Agatha Phelps.
iv. Ruth Turner, died Aft. 28 Jul 1806 in probably Bedford Co., VA; married Moses Hurt; born Abt. 1718 in Pamunkey Neck, King William Co., VA; died Abt. 1806 in Bedford Co., VA.
v. Richard Turner, born Abt. 1720 in Caroline Co., VA; died 1769 in Bedford Co., VA; married Nancy Johns Abt. 1748 in Albemarle Co., VA (perhaps); born 30 Apr 1732 in King William Co., VA; died 30 Jan 1822 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Richard Turner:
The following is quoted from pages 199-201 of "Leftwich-Turner Families of Virginia and Their Connections" (1931) by Walter Lee Hopkins:

James Turner settled in Bedford County, Va., at an early period, and he was possessed of considerable real estate in that county. In 1761 he made deeds conveying to his children and sons-in-law tracts of land in severalty; his wife, no doubt, had departed life as she did not unite in the conveyances. He died in 1793.

James Turner did not leave a will, and it appears that he deeded no property to his son, Richard Turner, in Bedford County, Va. However, he may have deeded his son, Richard, property in some other county, or when Bedford was a part of Lunenburg County, from which Bedford County was formed in 1753. In a letter dated November 12, 1821, from Rev. James Turner to his son, Rev. Jesse Hopkins Turner, of Richmond, Va., the original of which is now in the possession of the writer, he says: "I must not forget to tell you that your Uncle Austin (Augustine Leftwich) is married to our Aunt Sally Turner, widow of Uncle Admire, and when married their ages added together made 149 years. Did you ever hear the like?" Also, in a letter written by Mrs. Mildred Otey Leftwich, daughter of Rev. James Turner to Mrs. Roger A. Pryor in 1882, she says: "Augustine Leftwich married my father's sister, Molly Turner. In his old age he married Mrs. Sarah Turner, the widow of my father's uncle." The marriage records of Bedford County, Va., show that Augustine Leftwich married Sarah Turner (widow), September 26, 1821, and it will be noted herein that Admire Turner died in 1818, leaving will mentioning his wife, Sally Turner. Augustine Leftwich was born September 10, 1744, therefore, he was seventy-seven years of age, and his wife seventy-two years of age when they were married. ...

Richard Turner (James), b. cir. 1730, d. in 1769. In 1761, he purchased eight hundred acres of land in Bedford County on Little Otter River from Richard Randolph of Henrico County, Va. He made a will dated October 28, 1768, admitted to record in Bedford County, Va., June 27, 1769. He married Nancy Johns (b. April 20, 1732, d. January 30, 1822), cir. 1757. "Died at the house of James Turner, his mother, the 13th of January, 1822, at three o'clock in the morning. She was interred the same evening at Major Augustine Leftwich's, by the side of her daughter, Mary Leftwich. She had for many years made a consistent and reputable profession of religion. A few of her last years were very uncomfortable to herself, owing to an evident derangement of her mental powers.
"Before this unhappy event, she had lived almost continually in the constant expectation and desire of her dissolution, that she might be with Christ. Had she lived to see the 30th day of the following month, April, she would have been ninety years old." Written by her son, Rev. James Turner, in his Bible.

More About Richard Turner:
Date born 2: Abt. 1720
Date born 3: Abt. 1730

Notes for Nancy Johns:
The death notice for Ann "Nancy" Johns Turner, who died in Bedford County, VA at the home of her son, James Turner:

"Died at the house of James Turner, his mother, the 13th of Jan., 1822, at 3 o'clock in the morning. She was intered the same evening at Major Augustine Leftwich's by the side of her daughter, Mary Leftwich. She had for many years made a consistent and reputable profession of religion. A few of her last years were very uncomforgable to herself,owing to an evident derangement of her mental powers.

Before this unhappy event she had lived almost continually in the constant expectation and desire of her dissolution, that she might be with Christ. Had she lived to see the 30th day of the following April, she would have been 90 years old."

More About Nancy Johns:
Name 2: Ann 'Nancy' Johns
Burial: Augustine Leftwich family plot, Bedford Co., VA

18 vi. James Turner, Jr., born Abt. 1729 in New Kent Co. or Caroline Co., VA?; died Abt. 1791 in Franklin Co., VA; married ? Phelps?.
vii. Admire Turner, born Abt. 1738 in Caroline Co., VA; died 1818 in Bedford Co., VA; married Sarah Allen Abt. 1765; born Abt. 1749 in Virginia; died 1833 in Bedford Co., VA.

More About Admire Turner:
Date born 2: 1738

viii. Elijah Turner, born Abt. 1747; died 1820 in Bedford Co., VA; married Sarah ?; died Aft. 23 Oct 1820.

38. John Phelps, born Abt. 1700; died Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for John Phelps:
http://pages.suddenlink.net/phelpsdna/Southern_Phelps_Research/VirginiaPhelps/Bedford/Payne_JohnPhelps_HOB.pdf

John Phelps d 1772 of Bedford County, Virginia was a member of the Virginia House of
Burgesses, the forebear of the Virginia General Assembly, the oldest continuously
operating legislative body in the western hemisphere. When Bedford was formed in
December 1753 from the counties of Albemarle and Lunenburg, John Phelps, with
William Callaway, served as one of Bedford's first two burgesses. Phelps served four
assemblies in the House of Burgesses beginning August 22, 1754. At the time of his
appointment, Phelps already enjoyed a reputation as a respected Justice in Lunenburg
and Bedford counties1 a Coroner in Lunenburg,2 and an Anglican Vestryman in
Lunenburg's Parish of Cumberland.3
We find the following information in Our Kin: the genealogies of some of the early
families who made history in the founding and development of Bedford County, Virginia.
Published 1930, author Mary Denham Ackerly wrote, "John Phelps, the first of the name
of whom we have any authentic record, was already settled in Brunswick County, Va.,
when Lunenburg was taken from that county, and was one of the first Justices of the
new county. He, with Matthew Talbot and others, was present at the first Court of
Lunenburg County held May 5, 1746. When the increase in population made it
necessary to form still another county from Lunenburg's territory, and Bedford came into
being, we find John Phelps again at the head of affairs—Justice of the Peace, and a
Justice of the County Court in Chancery."
The House of Burgesses in the 1750s
John Phelps' entered his first session as a burgess
with fellow freshman Peter Jefferson of Albemarle
County, father of future Declaration of Independence
author, Thomas Jefferson. (Thomas Jefferson later
represented Albemarle County in the House of
Burgesses from 1769-1774). It is likely that Phelps
was already acquainted with the family; in 1749 he
was sworn in as Justice of the Peace and Justice of
the Chancery with Field Jefferson, uncle of Thomas
Jefferson, in Lunenburg County.4 The two also
served as Vestrymen in the Parish of Cumberland.5
In addition to Jefferson, Phelps also served in the
House of Burgesses with Augustine Washington of
Westmoreland County, father of George
Washington. In fact, he served in the company of
many Virginians who would later become venerable leaders of the American Revolution:
Peyton Randolph, Virginia Attorney General and later first president of the Continental
Congress; Benjamin Harrison of "Berkeley" in Charles City County and George Wythe of
Williamsburg, both signers of the Declaration of Independence and both representatives
to the Continental Congress; Richard Bland of Prince George County, also a member of
the Continental Congress. The oratorical and legislative experience these burgesses
gained would serve them well in the years to follow when they would forge their own
country after the defeat of the British at Yorktown in 1781. Indeed, the seeds of
discontent with the Crown were sewn in the years immediately preceding the dissolution
of the House of Burgesses in 1769.*
The last session John Phelps served in the House of Burgesses, August 5, 1755, was
marked by an incident that proved to be a harbinger of events to follow. According to the
Colonial Virginia Register, compiled by William Glover and Mary Newton Standard and
published in 1902, burgess representative and Virginia militia Colonel James Patton of
Augusta County was killed by Indians on his way home from the previous session held
May 1, 1755. During the August 5th session, a writ was requested for an election in
Augusta to fill Patton's vacancy.
The French and Indian War
The French and Indian War (1754-1763)
made life on the Virginia frontier particularly
dangerous, especially for men like Col.
Patton and Capt. Phelps who lived west of
Albemarle County. During the conflict the
majority of Indian tribes sided with the
French, with the one exception of the
Iroquois Confederacy who fought on the side
of Great Britain and the colonies.
Trading posts and forts were used by both the British and the French forces whose
countries went to war over the vast disputed territory commonly referred to as the Ohio
Country, bounded east to west by the Appalachian mountains and the Mississippi river,
and north to south by the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. While serving as
Lieutenant Governor Virginia from 1751 to 1758, Robert Dinwiddie began granting
patents of land in the Ohio valley to Virginia citizens after learning the French were
entrenching themselves in the region (at the time, Virginia stretched from the
Chesapeake Bay to the Mississippi). In the winter of 1753-54, Dinwiddie sent a 21 yearold
Virginia militia officer, George Washington, to deliver a letter on behalf of the Crown
demanding the French vacate the region; however, the French—not surprisingly—
refused. Throughout 1754 and 1755 there was much skirmishing, but the war didn't
officially begin until May 15, 1756, when Britain declared war on the French, marking the
beginning of what is referred to in Europe as the Seven Years' War. Washington
suffered his first and only military defeat of his career during the war and mourned the
death of his commander, Major General Edward Braddock whom he carried off the
battlefield near present day Pittsburgh on 9 July, 1755. It wasn't until 1758 that the
British tide began to turn with victories in the north at Fort Carillon (Ticonderoga) on
Lake Champalin, and Fort Fronteac on the eastern edge of Lake Ontario. The war ended
with the British victorious on 10 February 1763 upon the signing of the Treaty of Paris.
Capt. John Phelps' service in the French and Indian War
Phelps researcher Mary Gaglin writes that on August 20, 1756 Capt. John Phelps was
commissioned to command a Company of Rangers to be raised in Bedford County to
protect the settlers from the French and Indians in the area. There is also evidence to
suggest that six years prior to his Ranger commission, John Phelps and other
"Gentlemen" of Lunenburg County were sworn in as "Captains of the Foot in this
County." 6 For their service in "the defence and protection of the frontier of this colony,
against the incursions and depredations of the French, and their Indian allies" members
of the Militia of the County of Bedford were paid in September 1758. Capt. John Phelps
tops the long list of Bedford militia troops, receiving the sum of £2.8.0 for his service.7
Presumably, Captain Phelps returned to Bedford after the French and Indian War, living
out the rest of his days quietly with his family on his land near Lynchburg, Virginia. He
died in Bedford County in 1772. His will, recorded in Will Book "A" page 137, lists wife,
Mary and children, Jane, Judith, Sarah, Ann, Mary, Betty, John, and Aggey. His son, Lt.
John Phelps d 1801, also served as an officer in the militia, and later, as an officer in the
Virginia line during the American Revolution.
* In 1769 the House of Burgesses was dissolved by the Governor in response to its
actions against the Townshend Act, so named for Charles Townsend, British Chancellor
of the Exchequer. Passed by Parliament in 1767, the Act placed a tax on common
products imported into the American Colonies. These items included lead, paper, paint,
glass, and tea. In contrast to the Stamp Act of 1765, the laws were not a direct tax, but a
tax on imports. The most public display of protest toward the Act was carried out in 1773
in what has become known as the Boston Tea Party. Rather than continue to pay the
oppressive import tax, colonial Bostonians dressed as Indians raided British ships
carrying imported tea and dumped the leaves into Boston harbor.
SOURCES
The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First
Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619. Volume VII. Franklin Press, Richmond,
Virginia, 1820.
Our Kin: the genealogies of some of the early families who made history in the founding
and development of Bedford County, Virginia. Mary Denham Ackerly. 1930
Colonial Virginia Register, compiled by William Glover and Mary Newton Standard,1902.
The Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition (1910–1911)
END NOTES
1 Lunenburg Co., VA, Order Bk. 2, 1748-1752, 5 June 1749 - June Court - Robert JONES, Henry
EMBRY, John HALL, Wm HAYWARD, Matthew TALBOT, Field JEFFERSON Wm WYNNE,
James MITCHELL, David STOKES, Lewis DELONY, John PHELPS, W, HILL, John CALDWELL,
Cornelius CARGILL, Abraham COOK, Hugh LAWSON, Thomas BOLLING, Liddal BACON,
Thomas LANEAR, Robert Henry DYER, Wm CALDWEL, Peter FONTAINE, Abraham MARTIN,
John COX, & Nicholas HAYLE Gentlemen, sworn as Justices of the Peace/Justices in the County
Court in Chancery.
2 Lunenburg Co., VA, Order Bk. 2, 1748-1752, June Court p.10. 2 June 1748 - John PHELPS,
Gent. sworn as a Coroner of County.
3 Lunenburg Co., VA, Order Bk. 2, 1748-1752, Oct. Court 1749 p. 214. Elected Vestryman: 3
October 1749 - October Court. Vestrymen elected by freeholders & housekeepers of Parish of
Cumberland, Lunenburg Co.: John EDLOE, Peter FONTAINE, junr, Field JEFFERSON, Francis
EALEDGE, Wm EMBRY, Luke SMITH, THos BOULDIN, John PHELPS, John COX, Abraham
MARTIN & Clement READ; each man signs conformable to doctrine of Church of England.
4 Lunenburg Co., VA, Order Bk. 2, 1748-1752, 5 June 1749.
5 Lunenburg Co., VA, Order Bk. 2, 1748-1752, Oct. Court 1749 p. 214.
6 Lunenburg Co., VA, Order Bk. 2, 1748-1752, July Court 1750 p. 290. "And Francis ELLEDGE,
John PHELPS, Wm CALDWELL, & Wm POOL Gentlemen were sworn as Captains of the Foot in
this County."
7 1758 - Bedford Co., VA - September 1758 - 32d George II. "Money paid to the Militia of the
County of Bedford, and for Provisions furnished by sundry Inhabitants of the said county, viz. To
John Phelps, as captain (£2.8.0)."
Special thanks to Phelps family researchers whose assistance contributed to this paper:
• Mary Galgin
• Elizabeth Harris
• William C. Payne
• Brian Phelps
• Douglas K. Phelps
• Mark Phelps
• J.C. Rogers
• Margaret Swanson
Douglas Payne, Jr. is a gggggg-grandson of Capt. John Phelps d 1772 of Bedford Co,
VA and has deep roots in Bedford. Doug is a graduate of Fishburne Military School in
Waynesboro, Virginia and Hampden-Sydney College. He lives with his wife, Ashby and
son Turner, in Richmond, Virginia. His e-mail address is [emailprotected]
Lineage --
1. Capt. John Phelps (d 1772) of Bedford Co, VA m Mary (?)
2. Betty Phelps m Francis Pollard (b ca 1720 d 1771)*
3. Sarah Frances Pollard (1763-1810) m Thomas Payne (ca 1760-1847) in 1783 in
Bedford Co, VA
4. John Payne (1788-1866) m Sarah W Power (ca 1789-1850) on 10 Dec 1814 in Bedford
Co, VA
5. James H Payne (ca 1822-1882) m Martha Ann Worley (ca1823-1851) on 21 Nov 1842
Bedford Co, VA
6. John Henry Payne, CSA (1844-1907) m Manervia Angeline Forbes (1842-1929) on 30
Mar 1864 in Franklin Co, VA
7. James N Payne (1886-1947) m Lena Maude Mitchell (1893-1977) on 1 Nov 1921 in
Roanoke, VA
8. N D Payne Sr (b 1934-) m Iva Jeanette Rakes (b 1937) on 10 June 1955 in Roanoke,
VA
9. N Douglas Payne Jr (b 1964) m Ashby J Sanderson (b 1969) on 1 May 1999 in
Goochland Co, VA
10. Turner Ashby Payne (2000 in Henrico Co, VA)
* from Elizabeth Harris

Children of John Phelps are:
19 i. ? Phelps?, died Aft. Apr 1791 in Franklin Co., VA?; married James Turner, Jr..
ii. Agatha Phelps, married Nathan Turner.
iii. Betty Phelps, died Aft. 1779 in Alabama?; married (1) Francis Pollard; born Abt. 1720; died Abt. 1771 in Bedford Co., VA; married (2) Harris Toney Aft. 1771.

Notes for Francis Pollard:
http://www.momslookups.com/generations/pollard.html

This page was revised on October 27, 2007. The main new point added on that date was proof that Francis Pollard's wife Betty married a second time, and very likely moved to Alabama with Harris Toney, her second husband. See the Second Generation below for full discussion.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Generation
Merel Pollard provided me with evidence establishing Francis Pollard's father as George Pollard of Amelia Co. VA.
See James H. Maloney's WorldConnect site for documentation on George, including identity of his son Francis as a tithable in 1738.

Francis Pollard was probably born about 1720 based on his first appearance as a tithable in his father's household, and other circ*mstantial evidence. By 1749 he was living in Cumberland Parish, Lunenberg Co. VA, working as a blacksmith. He bought land in 1753 on Otter Creek, Lunenberg (now Bedford) County, from John and Mary Phelps, thought to be the parents of his wife Betty. He died in Bedford County in the summer of 1771 His estate was finally settled in 1780.

Previously I listed another child, Elizabeth Pollard who married Harris Toney. This was based on the estate settlement of 1780 in which Elizabeth Pollard Toney received one share, and from which most people have concluded that she was a daughter, despite there being another child named Betty in the same family.

In October 2007 Mark Parsons questioned this, primarily on the basis of two key facts:

First, the marriage bond for Betty Pollard and Flayl Payne (Franklin Co. VA, 1790) names Betty's mother as Elizabeth TONEY
Second, Francis Pollard's will specifies that in case his widow remarries "that then the said Estate Shall Be Taken out of her possession and an Equal Childs part of my Estate Given her and her heirs forever". This therefore accounts for her receiving the same amount as the other children in the 1780 settlement.

Descendants of Harris Toney and Elizabeth or Betty (Phelps) Pollard lived in Madison Co. AL. I don't know yet when the family moved there, or if that is where Betty died. If you have information on this family, please contact me.

iv. John Phelps, Jr., died 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; married Jemima Turner or Susannah Younger.

48. William Witt, born Abt. 1675 in Shirley Hundred, Charles City Co., VA; died Jun 1754 in present-day Fluvanna (then Albemarle) Co., VA. He was the son of 96. John Witt and 97. Ann Daux. He married 49. ? Abt. 1708.
49. ?

Notes for William Witt:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Witt-12

Timeline
1675 William Witt was born in Charles City County, probably north of the James River near Shirley Hundred District and the border of Henrico County
1708/1709 William marries in Charles City County
1710 Son John Witt born in Charles City County
1712 Son Benjamin Witt born in Charles City County
1715 14 September 1715 brothers John and William Witt, both of Charles City County, jointly purchased 300 acres in Henrico County "at a place called Tuckahoe" about 25 miles up the James River from where the immigrant John Witt had lived.[6]
1716 Daughter Sarah Witt born in Henrico County; became Albemarle County, Virginia in 1738
1720 Henrico County court July 1720, John and William Witt presented a petition concerning bounds of their land. Same court, a suit of William Witt vs Boothe Napier was dismissed[7]
1732 Daughter Agness Witt born in Henrico County; became Albemarle County in 1738
1737 17 September 1737 - Henrico County, Virginia: William Witt was a witness to a deed between Thomas Owen and John Simkins, 190 acres on the north side of James River on Broad Branch.
1738 William Witt and sons moved about 40 miles west, purchasing land in St. Anne's Parish on the Rivanna River and Ballenger's Creek in Goochland County; became Albemarle County in 1738 and Fluvanna County in 1777.[8]
1741 10 August 1741. William Witt deeded the land purchased in 1738 to son John Witt. It is described as bounded by the James and Rivanna Rivers, and Ballenger's Creek, Goochland County.[9]
1746 5 June 1746 - Goochland County, Virginia: Samuel Burk, 400 acres adjoining to the N side of the Rivanna River, crossing a Neck; adjoining William Randolph, Samuel Burk, William Moor and William Witt.
1754 Will of William Witt dated 25 April 1754, Parish of Saint Anne, Albemarle County, Virginia Colony
1754 May 1754 approximate date of William's death
1754 13 June 1754 William's will proven in Albemarle County Court, Will Book 2, pp 20-21
1754 13 December 1754 John Witt, William's son, granted certificate of probate in Albemarle County Court, Will Book 2, p 20
A note on county formation in Virginia: Henrico County formed 1643; part of Henrico became Goochland County in 1728; Albemarle County formed from Goochland in 1744; Fluvanna County formed from part of Albemarle County in 1777.

************************************************
The following has been copied and pasted from the Burgess Family and Relatives: Daux Family website, http://www.surnames.com/gedcom/burgess_jim/i0000457.htm#i457

5. William Guillaume3 Witt (John_i2, Robert1 Whytt) was born in Charles City, Virginia about 1680. William died June 1754 in "roseland", Albemarle, Va.

He married Elizabeth Daux in Of Albemarle, Virginia, about 1718. Elizabeth was born in Of Albemarle, Virginia about 1698. Elizabeth died before August 10, 1741 in Albemarle, Va. Albemarle County, Virginia Will probated 13 Jun 1754. Witt information foun in Virginia Soldiers of 1776, Volume l page 159-165. William Witt came to America in 1699 with 500 Huguenots from France through England. They left from Hampton, England. The King gave them 10,000 ACRES in Virginia. In 1738 this land was in Goochland County, Virginia. Later the land was in Albemarle County, Virginia, but today it is in Fluvanna County, Virginia. WILLS Albemarle County, Virginia In the name of God Amen. I William Witt of the parish of Saint Anne and the county of Albemarle, being in perfect health and sound memory, thanks be to Almighty God for the same I do think it to constitute and present this my last will and testament in manner and form as followeth viz. First I commit my spirit unto the Hands of Almighty God that first gave it. Secondly my Body to the Earth to be buried in a descent and Christianly manner. In primis I give and bequeath unto my beloved son Benjamin Witt a grey mare, a great Bible, one pewter bason, one plate and half of my wearing cloat. I give and bequeath to my daughter, Sarah Caniday one feather bed and furniture and all the meat and corn on my plantation for the use of her and her children. Her insueing year. Likewise I lend to my daughter my negro Tom Titt such time her husband John Caniday comes in and takes care of her and her children as a husband ought to do. In the case of the said Caniday should not return, the negro to remain in her possession during her natural life and afore to be divided among my children except my son Benjamin Witt, Sarah Caniday, and AGNES KEY. Item, I give and bequeath to my daughter, AGNES KEY, my negro fellow, Ned all the rest of my estate, household furniture, cattle, horses, hoggs, etc. I desire it may be equally divided among my children except Benjamin Witt, Sarah Caniday and AGNES KEY. I do appoint my son John Witt and Peter Chaleen Executors of this my last will and Testament revoking all former Wills by me made as Witness whereof I have here unto set my Hand and Seal 25 Day of April 1754. Witnesses Henry Markin Samuel Hopkins and William Witt John Barnet Sullins Hankins 929.273 SV53G or C Halifax County Virginia Josiah Sullins d 1773 married Lavinia Witt Family of John Key Senior 0877512 #4 929.273 M214w Thomas Harlan married Sarah Witt Early Virginia Index to Tombstone Bedford County, Virginia 6018757 BK929.273 A1 No3853 The Virginia Genealogist page 102 (7) William Witt, the Huguenot immigrant and father of Agnes (Witt) Key, lived in Albemarle (now Fluvanna) County on the north side of the Rivanna in the neck cut off by Ballenger" Creek (different from Ballenger's Creek, near Warren. He purchased 200 acres of land there in 1738, when it was still Goochland(Deed Book 3page 125 Goochland County) and in 1741 gave it to his son John, Deed Book 3 page 464.) who patented other land nearby Va Patents Vol 33 page 844, V 36 page 811) and continued to live there until 1772. This was only a few miles down the Rivanna from Mechunk Creek, where Richard Hickman (clerk of the Council, York County), Edwin Hickman (sheriff of Spotsylvania County), John Key and other Spotsylvanians patented 12,000 acres in 1729. Presumbaly Will Witt was still living in this part of Albemarle County when his daughter Agnes married John Key, Jr. in 1750, and when he died in 1754. In 1761 a John Key probably the husband of Agnes Witt, John Witt and Robert Napier witnessed an Albemarle County deed for land on Cunningham Creek (now in Fluvanna County adjoining the land of Patrick Napier brother of Robert, and Joseph Thompson (first sheriff of Albemarle), not far from where Palmyra is located. Martin Key also owned land on Cunningham Creek adjoining Joseph Thompson, and inventoried estates in this area with Patrick Napier. The Key-Witt association continued into Amherst County, where in 1773 John Witt bought 96 acres from his brother Abney in Lackey's Thoroughfare - - land which had originally been patented by John Key Jr. Virginia Soldiers of 1776 by Louis Burgess Volume 1 page 882 (Look at page 881 for more information on the Witt Family Note of Michael S. Cole, M.D. 7410 Oxford Place, Fort Smith, Ar 72903-4232 William Witt (id 1928) B 1674/80 at France (by tradition) to Mildred ? ? or Mary ? ? Daux? ? (widowed). 7 Children died Apr / Jun 1754 at Albemarle County, Virginia (1:Albemarle County, Virginia Will Book 2, pp. 2-0-21 (2: Tradition says hewas Huguenot" b actually, probably wife was Huguenot.) (3.His parents were living in Charles County, Virginia in 1673.) 4. The order and names of some children are without proof. (Harbours in America p. 601). Sources: . My Virginia Kin page 47 Compendium of American Genealogy Vol 4 11111! Our Ancestors Families, Ohio Society of Colonial Dames Virginia Soldiers of 1776 Volume 2 DA11R Patriot Index 1985 NSDA1 Bicentennial Ancestor Index 1976 Ohio Ancestors Families Ohio Society Colonial Dames

http://crossedbrushstudio.com/windowsintoourpast/Vol8/witt.htm

WITT
Supplemental Information to "Windows Into Our Past A Genealogy of the Parsons, Smith & Associated Families," Vol. 1, © 1996, Judy Parsons Smith .

Faulty Tradition
By Wayne Witt Bates

Faulty rationale begets faulty Tradition. And that's what happened here. However sincere, the faulty Witt tradition can be traced back to "Year Book No. 1," dated 1924, of the Huguenot Society of the Founders of Manakin in the Colony of Virginia.

THE OLD WITT TRADITION WAS FLAWED IN THREE MAIN AREAS
1. William Witt d1754 was not the immigrant but son of John Witt and wife Ann Daux ; and William Witt was not born in Southern France but in Charles City Co., VA (in order to be with his parents).
2. John Witt was the immigrant and he was imported as a "headright" (plantation owner paid his way) from England , not France (per Land Patent records).
3. Five sons attributed to William Witt d1754 (Lewis , Charles , William , Abner , and David ) were not his sons but his grandsons.

a. Lewis & Charles were sons of Benj. Witt d1774 of Buckingham Co., VA
b. William , Abner, and David were sons of John Witt d1782 of Amherst Co., VA

QUOTING FROM FAULTY RATIONALE IN HUGUENOT BOOK NO. 1
"In 1756, Land Deed of Prince Edward Co., VA of Benjamin Witt (son of William d1754), have as witnesses the names of his brothers, Charles Witt and Lewis Witt ."

"And in 1781, Amherst Co., will of John Witt Sr . (son of William d1754), his brothers William Witt Jr ., Abner Witt , and David Witt are witnesses

• The first known entry for William Witt (d1754) and his brother John Witt (d ca 1751) was in 1715, when they bought (jointly) 300 acres (known as Young Men's Adventure) from Charles Hudson in Henrico Co (that part now Goochland Co). The deed said that the WITT brothers were from Charles City Co., VA, the county of residence for the immigrant John Witt & wife Ann Daux per Charles City County court records.

• No reason to believe that William Witt (d1754) and his brother John Witt, Jr (d before 1751) came from England .

• Every reason to believe that they were sons of immigrant John Witt /Whitt and Ann Daux who were married after 1670 in Charles City Co., VA, per court records. Further, importation of John Witt to the Charles City County area supported by Land Patents.

• No documentation to support the old Witt tradition which has been published in books, such as

1. Vol. IV, "Compendium of American Genealogy," by Virkus.
2. Vol. 2, " Virginia Soldiers of 1776,"by Burgess
3. Year Book No. 1 published in 1924 by The Huguenot Society Founders of Manakin in the Colony of Virginia.

By tradition, this Richard Witt /Whitt was named Richard Oney Witt . By tradition, he was left on doorstep of William Witt D1754 of Charles City, Goochland and Albemarle counties, VA. There is no documentation or association with William Witt d1754 to support this "adoption" tradition.

Were the Witt's Huguenots?
By Robert W. Baird [i]

Probably not. The claim that the Witts were Huguenots was first made in print in 1924 by the Huguenot Society of the Founders of Manakin. No evidence was offered other than the proximity of the brothers John and William Witt to the Huguenot settlement at Manakin. Manakin was located on the south bank of the James River a few miles southwest of the land the Witt brothers bought in 1715. A few hundred Huguenots settled there in 1700, others elsewhere along the river. In fact, there are no Witts listed among the Huguenot settlers of that community (or any other). Nor are any Witts found among any naturalization records before or after the settlement. While there was a scattering of Huguenots among the earlier settlers of the area, there is no indication at all that the Witts were French.

The Huguenot Society created a myth that William Witt (whom we believe to be the son of John Witt the immigrant) was known as " Guillaume Witt " and immigrated from France to Virginia about 1700. In fact, he never lived in a Huguenot settlement, never appears in any record as French, is never mentioned in the Huguenot parish records, and signed his own name "William Witt". Some third-generation Witt children did indeed marry children of Huguenots, but this fact is more easily explained by the assimilation of Huguenot descendants into the local population. It is worth noting that the early Huguenot Society publications did not mention any of the Witt records of Henrico and Charles City County , thus apparently were based on the assumption that the Witts arrived in Virginia about 1700.

King William Parish, a French-speaking parish established for the benefit of the Huguenots, was established within St. James Parish. Its vestry book records births, deaths and other information for the Huguenot families in the area of Manakin, including those not resident within the Manakin settlement. No Witt appears at all in those records during the first thirty years, except for a notation of the birth of a child to Benjamin Witt , who had married a Huguenot wife. Later tithables do include John Witt III for the brief period in which he lived in the southern reaches of the parish, but so are several other non-Huguenots. The parish, which had no fixed boundaries, expanded its geography over the years as its French members expanded outward from the original settlement, thus encompassing several non-Huguenot residents.

Nonetheless, the Huguenot Society persists to this day in listing "Jean " and "Guillaume" Witt among the "authenticated founders" of the Manakin settlement.

The later discovery of the marriage of John Witt and Ann Daux seemed to some researchers to support the French connection. As noted elsewhere, the Daux probably were English as well. I might note that until 1680, immigrants not born in Virginia or England required an act of the House of Burgesses to become citizens. Unless naturalized, a foreign-born settler could not own land. These acts listing naturalizations are perfectly preserved, and no Witt appears in them. After 1680, the governor himself could bestow citizenship, and those records are mostly lost (though the declaration naturalizing the Manakin settlers does exist). Thus, assuming that the brothers John and William Witt were children of the immigrant John Witt, it seems quite likely that they were English. The name "Witt" in various forms is found among many 17th century English records. It is, of course, possible that these Witts were Huguenots who had immigrated to England a generation or two earlier – though this seems unlikely[ii].
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John Witt
John Witt , b. 1645, d. 1715, Charles City Co., VA; m. 1669, Albemarle, Charles City, VA to Ann Daux , daughter of Walter & Mary (Unknown)(Plaine) Daux , b. ca. 1650, Charles City, VA.

John & Ann (Daux) Witt had six (6) children:

1. "Guillaume" William Witt , b. 1675; d. 13 Jun 1754, "Roseland", Charlottesville, Albermarle Co., VA; bur. 13 Jun 1754, St. Anne Parish, Albemarle Co., VA; m. ca. 1700, Henrico Co., VA to Elizabeth Mary Daux .
2. John Witt II , b. 1671/1675[iii], Charles City , Goochland , Virginia ; d. aft. 1742-1751[iv], Goochland Co., VA
3. William Whitt Witt , b. 1675, Pays D'Avnis, La Rochere, France[v] or 1676, Charles City Co., VA; d. 25 Apr 1754[vi], St. Anne Albemarle, VA[vii]; m. 1708, France to Mary Elizabeth Daux[viii], daughter of Walter & Mary (Unknown) Daux, b. ca. 1710[ix], France; d. 1741, St. Anne Albemarle, VA[x].
4. Charles Witt , b. ca. 1685, Albemarle , VA
5. Edward Witt , b. ca. 1695, Albemarle , VA or 1685, Charles City , Charles City , Virginia
6. Littlebury Witt , b. 1683-1695, Albemarle , VA
7. Richard Olney Witt , b. 1705, Albemarle , VA [xi]
8. Richard Witt[xii] , b. 1680-1690, Goochland, VA[xiii]; d. 1769, Butte, NC[xiv]; m. to Elizabeth Liptrot, daughter of Edmund & Rachel (Unknown) Liptrot, b. ca. 1704.

William Witt
1. "Guillaume" William Witt , son of John & Ann (Daux) Witt , b. 1675; d. will dated 25 Apr 1754, proved 13 Jun 1754, "Roseland", Charlottesville, Albermarle Co., VA; bur. 13 Jun 1754, St. Anne Parish, Albemarle Co., VA; m. ca. 1700, Henrico Co., VA to Elizabeth Mary Daux.

William & Elizabeth Mary (Daux) Witt had five (5) children:

1.1. John Witt , b. ca. 1710; d. will dated 1781, proved 1782, Amherst Co., VA; m. to Lucy Unknown .
1.2. Benjamin Witt , b. ca. 1710; d. ca. 1775; m. to Marianne Chastain .
1.3. Child Witt
1.4. Child Witt
1.5. Mildred Witt , m. to Mr. Chastain – proposed child but unproven.

John Witt II
2. John Witt II , son of John & Ann (Daux) Witt , b. 1671, Charles City, Goochland, Virginia; d. aft. 1742, Goochland Co., VA; m. Anne Rogers .

John & Anne ( Rogers ) Witt , II had eight (8) children:

2.1. John Witt III , b. 1693, Charles City Co., VA; d. aft. 1779, Henry Co., VA; m. to Elizabeth Unknown [xv].
2.2. Sarah Witt , b. 1695, Charles City , VA; d. aft. 1769, Halifax , VA
2.3. Jesse Witt , b. 1698, France .
2.4. Sylvanus Witt[xvi], (proven son) b. by 1718; d. after 1765[xvii]. No Issue.
2.5. Miss Witt[xviii]; m. to David Barnet [xix]
2.6. Miss Witt[xx]; m. to John Farrar [xxi]
2.7. Charles Witt[xxii]
2.8. Mildred Witt , b. 1720, Amherst Co., VA

Edward Witt
5. Edward Witt , son of John & Ann (Daux) Witt, b. ca. 1695, Albemarle, VA or 1685, Charles City, Charles City, Virginia; d. ca. 1755; m. 1st to Elizabeth Unknown ; m 2nd to Mary Unknown .

Edward & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt had a (1) daughter:

5.1. Anne Witt, b. 1730, Bristol Parish

Edward & Mary (Unknown) Witt had two (2) sons:

5.2. John Witt , b. 1734, Bristol Parish
5.3. William Witt , b. ca. 1742

John Witt
1.1. John Witt , son of William & Elizabeth Mary (Daux) Witt , b. ca. 1710; d. will dated 1781, proved 1782, Amherst Co., VA; m. to Lucy Unknown .

In his will he names Lucy as mother of "my seven first sons". The David Witt who witnessed the will may be one of the two unnamed sons.

John & Lucy (Unknown) Witt had children nine (9) children[xxiii]:

1.1.1. Abner Witt
1.1.2. John Witt
1.1.3. Littleberry Witt
1.1.4. George Witt
1.1.5. Elisha Witt
1.1.6. William Witt
1.1.7. Lucy Witt
1.1.8. Mr. Witt
1.1.9. David Witt (presumed to be the name of 2nd unnamed son)

Benjamin Witt
1.2. Benjamin Witt , son of William & Elizabeth Mary (Daux) Witt , b. ca. 1710; d. ca. 1775; m. to Marianne Chastain .

Benjamin & Marianne (Chastain) Witt had four (4) children:

1.2.1. Marianne Witt , b. 19 Mar 1723/3, King William Parish, VA[xxiv]
1.2.2. Lewis Witt
1.2.3. Charles Witt
1.2.4. Benjamin Witt Jr. , d. by late 1775

John Witt III
2.1. John Witt III , daughter of John & Anne (Rogers) Witt , b. 1693, Charles City Co., VA; d. aft. 1779, Henry Co., VA; m. by 1731 to Elizabeth Unknown [xxv], possibly the daughter of Sylvanus Pumphrey or Humphrey Parrish , d. after 1751.

http://home.nc.rr.com/rwbaird/witt/wittjohnIII.htm#_ftnref15

John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III had nine (9) children:

2.1.1. Charles Witt , b. ca. 1715; d. ca. 1781; m. to Lavinia 'Lamina' Harbour , daughter of Thomas & Sarah (Witt) Harbour , b. 1720, VA; d. aft. 1781, Halifax Co., VA.
2.1.2. David Witt , b. ca. 1720; d. 1810; m. Sarah Harbour , daughter of Thomas Harbour , b. ca 1735; d. 1819.
2.1.3. Jesse Witt (proven son), b. ca. 1730; d. will probated 25 Sept 1809, Henry Co., VA; m. to Martha Cheatham .
2.1.4. Elijah Witt , d. ca. 1775; m. possibly to Jane Harbour , daughter of Thomas Harbor .
2.1.5. John Witt IV , b. ca. 1725-30; m. ca. 1753[xxvi], Goochland Co., VA to Mary Bullington .
2.1.6. Mary Witt , b. ca. 1736; d. ca. 1805; m. 4 Sept 1757[xxvii], Northam Parish, Goochland Co., VA to John Bullington .
2.1.7. Hannah Witt, b. ca. 1736; d. ca. 1805; m. 2 Jul 1756[xxviii], Goochland Co., VA to Charles Hulsey (or Hudlesley ).
2.1.8. Judith/Judah Witt , b. ca. 1736; m. 22 Nov 1756[xxix], Northam Parish, Goochland Co., VA to John Matlock .
2.1.9. Elizabeth Witt , possible daughter, d. 1810; m. Thomas Smith .

Sarah Witt
2.2. Sarah Witt , daughter of John & Anne ( Rogers ) Witt , b. 1695, Charles City, VA; d. aft. 1769-1777[xxx], Halifax, VA; m. 25 Aug 1715, Charles City Co., VA to Thomas Harbour /Harber , b. 1675, Wales, England; d. 1768, Halifax, Virginia.

The Harbours came to this country in the early 1700's from Wales . They came by way of Charles County , Virginia to Lee County . They settled on land lying on the Mayo River near the state line in Lunenburg Co., (now Patrick Co.) Virginia .

Thomas & Sarah (Witt) Harbour had ten (10) children:

2.2.1. David Harbour , b. 1716.
2.2.2. Talmon Harbour , b. c. 1718-1728; d. 1821, Patrick Co., VA; m. ca. 1745 to Mary Wright .
2.2.3. Lavinia 'Lamina' Harbour , b. 1720, VA; d. aft. 1781, Halifax Co., VA; m. to Charles Witt , son of John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III, b. ca. 1715; d. ca. 1781.
2.2.4. Abner Harbour , b. ca. 1730; d. 1778, Henry County, VA; m. to Joyce Thornhill .
2.2.5. Elisha Harbour , b. ca. 1733; d. aft. 1773; m. to Margaret Unknown .
2.2.6. Mary Harbour , m. Palatiah Shelton .
2.2.7. Elijah Harbour , b. ca. 1735; d. 1769, Pittsylvania County , VA ; m. to Prudence Pusey .
2.2.8. Jane Harbour , m. Elijah Witt , son of John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III, d. ca. 1775.
2.2.9. Sarah Harbour , m. David Witt , son of John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III, b. ca. 1720; d. 1810 .
2.2.10. Adonijah Harbour , m 1st 25 Aug 1769 to Ann ' Nancy ' Dalton ; m 2nd 3 Apr 1791 to Charlotte Gallihue Dalton , widow of Samuel Dalton .

Jesse Witt
2.1.3. Jesse Witt (proven son), son of John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III, b. ca. 1730; d. will probated 25 Sept 1809, Henry Co., VA; m. to Martha Cheatham , daughter of Benjamin Cheatham [xxxi].

Jesse & Martha (Cheatham) Witt III had six (6) children:

2.1.1.1. Joseph Witt
2.1.1.2. David Witt
2.1.1.3. Joel Witt
2.1.1.4. Tabitha Witt
2.1.1.5. Elizabeth Witt
2.1.1.6. Nancy Witt

Hannah Witt
2.1.7. Hannah Witt, daughter of John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III, b. ca. 1736; d. ca. 1805; m. 2 Jul 1756[xxxii], Goochland Co., VA to Charles Hulsey (or Hudlesley ).

Charles & Hannah (Witt) Hulsey had seven (7) children:

2.1.7.1. James Hulsey
2.1.7.2. Charles Hulsey
2.1.7.3. Adonijah Hulsey
2.1.7.4. Jesse Hulsey
2.1.7.5. Adler Hulsey
2.1.7.6. Parthenia Hulsey
2.1.7.7. Elizabeth Hulsey

Elizabeth Witt
2.1.9. Elizabeth Witt , possible daughter, daughter of John & Elizabeth (Unknown) Witt III, d. 1810; m. Thomas Smith .

Thomas & Elizabeth (Witt) Smith had children

2.1.9.1. Drury Smith
2.1.9.2. Zachariah Smith
2.1.9.3. Mary Smith
2.1.9.4. Elizabeth Smith, m. to Mr. Mays or Mayo
2.1.9.5. Phoebe Smith, m. to Mr. Mayo

Lavina Harbour & Charles Witt
2.2.3. Lavina Harbour , daughter of Thomas & Sarah (Witt) Harbour , b. 1720, VA; d. aft. 178, Halifax Co., VA; m. ca. 1735 to Charles Witt , b. 1712, Manakin, Albermarle Co., VA.

Charles & Lavina (Harbour) Witt had two (2) children:

2.2.3.1. Joseph Witt , b. 1740
2.2.3.2. Elija Witt , b. 1756

Elija Witt
2.2.3.2. Elija Witt , son of Charles & Lavina (Harbour) Witt , b. 1756; d. 1806; m. 1775 to Miss Hutchinson .

Elija & Miss (Hutchinson) Witt had a (1) son:

2.2.3.2.1. John Witt , b. 18 Apr 1780.

John Witt
2.2.3.2.1. John Witt , son of Elija & Miss (Hutchinson) Witt , b. 18 Apr 1780; d. ca. 1807-1871; m. 18 Jun 1800 to Eleanor Penny .

John & Eleanor (Penny) Witt had a daughter:

2.2.3.2.1.1. Mary Witt , b. 1803; d. 1899; m. Thomas McKay

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[i - ii] Copyright © 2001-2003 Robert W. Baird, All Rights Reserved from http://home.nc.rr.com/rwbaird/witt/wittnotes.html 2/17/04 - Bob's Genealogy Filing Cabinet.
[iii - iv] Halcyon Days address is P.O. Box 2640, Glen Rose, TX 76043. found at http://www.witts-end.org/tree/jwitt26gen/fam/fam00004.html 2/17/04
[v - x] Genealogy of the Peak family, Record Type: Family Group Sheets from: http://users.frii.com/boz/fam00411.htm on 2/17/04.
[xi] AFN:N096-0Fis this the same individual as Richard Whitt?
[xii - xiv] AFN:TC60-2K; is this the same individual as Richard Olney Witt?
[xv - xvi] Halcyon Days address is P.O. Box 2640, Glen Rose, TX 76043. found at http://www.witts-end.org/tree/jwitt26gen/fam/fam00004.html 2/17/04
[xvii] http://home.nc.rr.com/rwbaird/witt/wittjohnII.htm 2/4/04
[xviii - xxiii] Halcyon Days address is P.O. Box 2640, Glen Rose, TX 76043. found at http://www.witts-end.org/tree/jwitt26gen/fam/fam00004.html 2/17/04
[xxiii] http://home.nc.rr.com/rwbaird/witt/wittjohnI.htm 2/17/04
[xxiv] Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia 1707-1770, Manakin Huguenot Society, reprint 1966.
[xxv] Halcyon Days address is P.O. Box 2640, Glen Rose, TX 76043. found at http://www.witts-end.org/tree/jwitt26gen/fam/fam00004.html 2/17/04
[xxvi - xxix] The Douglas Register
[xxx] Halcyon Days address is P.O. Box 2640, Glen Rose, TX 76043. found at http://www.witts-end.org/tree/jwitt26gen/fam/fam00004.html 2/17/04
[xxxi] Sylvanus Witt witnessed the will of Benjamin Cheatham. Chesterfield Will Book 1, p. 550
[xxxii] The Douglas Register

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http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/WITT/2000-09/0967819173

From: [emailprotected]
Subject: Perplexus - Silhouette of 3rd Generation Witt Women of VA
Date: Fri, 1 Sep 2000 10:39:33 EDT

FROM THE FILES OF "WITT'S END" NEWSLETTER

http://www.halcyondays.com/witt.htm
Subscription $20 per year

Perplexus - from time to time, silhouettes of what appears to be 3rd
generation WITT women in "old" Albemarle CoVA, before counties were cut off.
The silhouettes need to be better developed for clearer picture.

Candidate father of the six (6) Witt women would have to be either
William Witt d1754, whose will inferred more children than named in his will;
or his brother John Witt d bef. 1751, who died without leaving a will.
They are the only WITT in the area at the proper time to be father of 3rd
generation Witt.

1. Wife of David Barnett. In 1751, he was witness, midst Witt surnames, to
sale of land belonging to deceased 2nd generation John Witt of Goochland
CoVA.
Thereby, he appeared to have vested interest in the land.

2. Wife of John Farrar. In 1751, he was witness, midst Witt surnames, of
sale of
land belonging to deceased 2nd generation John Witt of Goochland CoVA.
Thereby, he appeared to have vested interest in the land.

3. Wife of Charles Hulsley, Sr., based upon information from Hulsey
Researchers.
If so, this would be sibling of John Witt III, who died after 1779 in
Henry CoVa.
Daughter Hannah of John Witt III married Charles Hulsley, Junior.

4. Catherine/Katherine Witt, wife of William Matlock/Medlock of Albemarle
CoVA,
based upon research of Matlock/Medlock researchers.
William Witt d1754 bought land from William Matlock, and later sold the
land
to his son John Witt d1782.

5. Elizabeth Witt, wife of James Tuley/Tooley, Jr. of Albemarle/Amhest CoVa,
based upon research of Tuley/Tooley researchers.
In 1790 (DB F: 453), Elizabeth Tuley had land adjoining John Witt, Jr
(174-1825) in Amherst CoVa; and two daughters of Littleberry Witt d1796
married Tooley/TuleyTwoley.

6. Middy ?? Witt, wife of Peter Chastain, Jr. Relationship adduced because
Peter Chastain, Jr was named Executor, along with John Witt d1782, to the
will of William Witt d1754. Peter Chastain, Jr lived in what is now
Buckingham
CoVA near Benjamin Witt d1774, the son of William Witt d1754.

Further, contrary to "Witt Tradition," an authority on the ABNEY surname
submits that the wife of John Witt d1782 of Amherst CoVa was Lucy Abney, not
Lucy Littleberry. This has the ring of fact, because surname of Littleberry
does not appear in what passes for the 1790 census of Virginia. Given names
of Littleberry are plentiful , but no Littleberry surname.

Wayne Witt Bates

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http://www.genfiles.com/witt/were-the-witts-huguenots/

Were the Witts Huguenots?

This is a legend that persists to this day despite overwhelming evidence that it is not true. There is every reason to believe that, like the overwhelming majority of 17th century immigrants to Virginia, John Witt was an English citizen and a member of the Church of England.

It was more than 250 years after John Witt's arrival in Virginia that the "Huguenot legend" first surfaced. The claim that the Witts were Huguenots was first made in print in 1924 in a publication called Year Book No. 1 by the Huguenot Society of the Founders of Manakin in the Colony of Virginia. No evidence wasoffered other than the proximity of the brothers John and William Witt to the Huguenot settlement at Manakin. The claim was was repeated in 1927 in Virginia Soldiers of 1776 and in many subsequent publications. But the original claim was grossly mistaken.

The founder of this Huguenot Society, Mary Latham Norton, was a descendant of John Witt's son William Witt. She evidently assumed that William Witt was himself an immigrant and an otherwise undocumented settler in the Manakin settlement. She relentlessly promoted that view in the society's documents and in a number of other publications. She was, however, unaware of the Witt records in Henrico and Charles City County and thus did not realize that John Witt of Charles City County was the immigrant and that his sons were born in Virginia. Nor did she plot the location of William Witt's landholdings, which were some distance from the Huguenot settlement. Nonetheless, the Huguenot Society persisted until quite recently in listing "Jean" and "Guillaume" Witt among the "authenticated founders" of the Manakin settlement, claiming that they arrived in Virginia about 1700 from France.

Although the Huguenot Society has abandoned this claim it remains a very difficult legend to dispel, despite the fact that there is not a shred of evidence to support it.

Indeed there is a mountain of evidence against this claim. We know that the Witt brothers were from Charles City County, that they were children of an English citizen, signed their own names as "John" and "William", and never appear in even a single record of the Manakin settlement. Nor is either included among the many Huguenots who were naturalized as British citizens. They simply found themselves living, along with many other Englishmen, in the same county as the Huguenot settlement. At least one third-generation Witt did indeed marry a child of Huguenot immigrants, but that simply reflects the assimilation of Huguenot descendants into the local population.

Furthermore, while there are several 19th century accounts of prominent Witts, not a single one lays claim to Huguenot ancestry. Not one Witt claimed a Huguenot ancestry of his Witt ancestors until 1927, more than 250 years after John Witt immigrated. An 1860 account by Rev. Daniel Witt mentions that he was descended from Huguenots on his "father's side" of the family. But that surely is his father's mother, who was indeed a Huguenot descendant [correction, father's paternal grandmother, Marianne Chastain, wife of Benjamin Witt].

The settlement at Manakin was in King William Parish, a French-speaking parish established specifically for the benefit of the Huguenots inside the boundaries of thelarger St. James Parish. Its vestry book records births, deaths and other information for the Huguenot families in the area of Manakin, including those who resided outside the Manakin settlement. No Witt appears at all in those records during the first thirty years, except for a notation of the birth of a child to Benjamin Witt, who had married the daughter of a Huguenot immigrant. A few years later John Witt III appears as a taxable within the parish for the brief period in which he lived in the southern reaches of the parish, but so too do many other non-Huguenots. The parish, which had no fixed boundaries, expanded its geography over the years as its French members expanded outward from the original settlement, thus encompassing several non-Huguenot residents.

The later discovery of the marriage of John Witt and Ann Daux seemed to some researchers to support the French connection. As noted elsewhere, the Daux family was probably were English as well.

The final nail in this coffin is the fact that, until 1680, immigrants not born in Virginia or England required an act of the House of Burgesses to achieve citizenship. Unless naturalized, a foreign-born settler could not own land. These acts listing naturalizations are perfectly preserved, and no Witt appears in them. This despite the fact that we know John Witt was entrenched in Virginia by 1670. After 1680, the governor himself could bestow citizenship, and those records are mostly lost (though the declaration naturalizing the Manakin settlers doesexist). Thus, assuming that the brothers John and William Witt were children of the immigrant John Witt, it seems a certainty that they were English.

The name "Witt" in various forms is found among many 17th century English records. It is, of course, possible that these Witts were Huguenots who had immigrated to England a generation or two earlier – though this seems unlikely. I note that the descendants of a 17th century Witt immigrant to New England cling to the claim that their immigrant John Witt was an Englishman of Dutch descent rather than of French descent

More About William Witt:
Event 1: 1720, Henrico Co. Minute Book 3, p. 34. Suit of Wm Witt vs Boothe Napier was dismissed.
Event 2: 1728, Goochland County was formed from Henrico County.
Event 3: 17 Sep 1737, In Goochland Co., VA, was witness to a deed for Thomas Owen for land north of James River.
Event 4: 1744, Albemarle County was formed from Goochland County.
Event 5: Nov 1745, Albemarle Co., VA--Assault & Battery Case against Wm by Bellamy. (27 Pg 28)
Event 6: 1749, Albemarle Co., VA--On Jury with son John (28 p. 279)
Event 7: 1777, Land that was owned by Wm. Witt was in part of Goochland that became Fluvanna County in 1777.
Property 1: 14 Sep 1715, With his brother John purchased 300 acres - called Tuckahoe 25 miles up the James River purchased from Charles Hudson (then in Henrico Co.) Henrico Co. Deeds 1706-1737, 46.
Property 2: 1720, With brother John, presented a petition concerning bounds of their land.
Property 3: Oct 1731, Gave 150 acres to son John by deed
Property 4: 1738, Purchased land in St. Anne's Parish on the Rivanna River & Ballengers Creek. Goochland County Deed Book 3, p. 125.
Property 5: 10 Aug 1741, Goochland Co. (later Albemarle, now Fluvanna Co.), VA. Deed. Wm Witt, to John Witt, one of sons of Wm., for love and affection 200 acres on north side of James River, being land where I now live, bounded by the river, Ballengers Creek, with all houses.
Property 6: 1751, With nephew John, sold remaining 150 acres on Tuckahoe Creek that was purchased in 1715. Deed also signed by Eliz. Witt.
Residence: Abt. 1738, Moved 40 miles away from his home in Goochland. 200 acres on north fork of James River, Rivanna River & Ballengers Creek, purchased from Wm Matlock of St. James Parish. (Per Robt. Witt's book). Gave it to his son John on 10 Aug 1741.
Will: 23 Apr 1754, Albemarle Co., VA--Proved on 13 June 1754.John Witt (Son) & Peter Chastain Executors. Albemarle County will book 2, pg 20.

Notes for ?:
http://larry-family-history.blogspot.com/2013/06/was-william-witts-wife-mildred-daux.html

Sunday, June 30, 2013

Was William Witt's Wife Mildred Daux?

Speaking of William Witt (who was suppose to be a French Huguenot, see my previous post), I have seen Daux as the maiden name of his wife for as long as I have been in genealogy. One of my Witt cousins even passed along in a personal letter to me in 1981 that William Witt's wife was Mildred Daux (I've also seen Elizabeth). Since Walter Daux only had two daughters (see below) and there were no other Daux's in the area, where did Elizabeth/Mildred Daux come from? Thin air!

Again to quote Bob Baird on his website at http://genfiles.com/Witt/Mildred_Daux.htm :

"His wife has variously been claimed to be a woman named Mary, Elizabeth Daux, and Mildred Daux. The fact is that we have not one single record of her – her name appears in no records, and therefore any name we assign to her is pure speculation.

"It is extremely unlikely that she was a Daux. We know that Walter Daux had only two children, the daughters Anne and Susannah – one of whom was William Witt's mother. He had no sons and there is no sign of anyone else named Daux in the area."

You can get the full story at the link above. While you are prowling around also check out Bob's material on the Daux family at the links below:

The family of Walter Daux, father-in-law of John Witt I (Some Thoughts on Walter Daux) :- http://genfiles.com/Witt/Daux.htm

In Search of the Ancestry of Walter Daux is a similar paper but adds some information on a brief search for his father Richard Daux in England. :- http://genfiles.com/Witt/Witt_Daux.htm

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http://www.genfiles.com/witt/who-was-william-witts-wife/

Who Was William Witt's Wife?

The wife of William Witt (c1680 – 1754) has been the subject of considerable speculation among descendants.

She has been claimed to be a woman named Mildred Daux. Or a woman named Elizabeth Daux. Or a woman named Mary. The fact is that we have not one single record of her name. She appears in no records whatsoever.

The only conclusion we can reasonably reach is that she was surely not a Daux. We know that Walter Daux had only two children, the daughters Anne and Susannah – one of whom was William Witt's mother. There is no sign of anyone else named Daux in the area.

Her Gravestone – per Virginia Soldiers of 1776

This is surely a case of mistaken identity. According to a brief entry in Virginia Soldiers of 1776, Volume II:1

"Note. The original Register of the church of the French refugees was sold to Mr. Henry Huntington of San Gabriel, California, a collector of rare manuscript and it is said that he has decided to will it to the public library at Pasadena. Should you visit St. Ann's [sic] Parish, where is located the old church of Rev. Robert Ross [sic], you may be fortunate enough to find the tombstone of William Witt's wife, and read the very interesting inscription thereon. The old Witt homestead at Roselands in Nelson County remained in the possession of some representative of the family for about two hundred years. It passed from the family only a few years ago."

This is a very confusing statement for several reasons, not the least of which is that the first three sentences in this paragraph seem to be unrelated to one another. Let's examine the facts:
•St. Anne's Parish and Albemarle County were both established in 1745. Rev. Robert Rose moved from Essex County in 1747 to the part of Albemarle County that later became Nelson County and ministered to St. Anne's Parish until his death in 1751.2 At that time there were only two churches in Albemarle County, one of them the Ballenger's Creek Church near Howardsville on the James River and the other the Forge Church on the Hardware River. (Note that Ballenger Creek of modern Fluvanna County (where William Witt lived) is a different watercourse than Ballenger Creek of Albemarle County where the church was located.) 3 But by 1820 both buildings were in ruins, one of them burned to the ground and the other site occupied by a private residence.4 Neither church could have been visited in 1927, and neither has a discernible old cemetery.
•The same article also claims that William Witt died in 1741 [sic] and that his wife died before him. We know that no wife relinquished dower in his deed of gift to his son John on 15 September 1741, suggesting the possibility that she was indeed deceased by that date. However, it is clear from the Goochland deed books that at least some relinquishments of dower in that period were not recorded with the deed. His wife's death by 1741 is best left as a very plausible hypothesis rather than a fact.
•The "old Witt homestead at Roselands in Nelson County" couldn't possibly refer to William Witt, son of John Witt I. As far as we know, he never set foot in what became Nelson County. He lived and died in the part of Albemarle County that is now Fluvanna County.
•Nor could the homestead have been in the family for "about 200 years." There weren't any land acquisitions by his descendants in what became Nelson County until well after the death of William Witt.

1.Virginia Soldiers of 1776, Vol. II (1927), Louis Alexander Burgess, p883. [?]
2.Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia, Vol. I (1906), Bishop William Meade, p396-403. [?]
3.Both were sometimes spelled as "Ballinger". [?]
4.Albemarle County in Virginia (1901), Edgar Woods, pp124-125. [?]

Children of William Witt and ? are:
i. Sarah Witt
ii. John Witt II, born Abt. 1710 in probably Charles City Co., VA; died Abt. 1781 in Amherst Co., VA; married Lucy Abney.

Notes for John Witt II:
1. By deed dated 9-15-1741 William Witt to John Witt 200 acres.

2. By deed dated 7-14-1772 150 acres from John Witt to Roger Thompson.

3. Will of John Witt: Amherst County, Virginia, Will Book 2, page 34.
IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN: I, John Witt of Amherst County, being weak in body but in perfect memory, thanks be to God, but cauling to mind that it is appointed to all men to die, I do hereby constitute and ordain this my last will and testament, that is to say: I give my soul to God that gave it to me, and my body I desire may be buried in a decent manner within the earth at the discretion of my executors, nothing doubting but at the General Resurrection I shall receive the same by the mighty power of God again, and as touching my worldly estate I give and bequeath in the following manner:
Item. I give to my seven first sons, born of my wife, Lucy, ten shillings to be equally divided amongst them by my executors, being all the estate left to them by me.
Item. I lend to my well beloved wife, Lucy, and my daughter, Lucy, a reasonable maintenance out of my estate to be given and provided by my son, William Witt; and if in case he deceases before them the estate is to be taken into the hands of my executors to maintain them with during their lives; and my son, William Witt, if alive, to be possessed with all the lands and personal estate goods and chattels I dye possessed with, and if in case my son, William Witt, deceases without heir his estate to be sold and equally divided between Littlebury and George and Elisha Witt my three sons, and all other wills heretofore made I do hereby revoke, and do constitute this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have set my hand and seal the 4th day of December, 1781. I do hereby appoint John Witt, George and Littlebury Witt executors of this my last will and testament, and desire the same may be recorded.
Signed, sealed and delivered in the presents of Abner Witt, David Witt, William Witt, John Reid, Jon X Puckett. Probated March 4, 1782.

24 iii. Benjamin Witt, born Abt. 1712 in Goochland Co., VA?; died Abt. 1774 in Buckingham Co., VA; married Marianne Chastain 27 Dec 1731 in Manakintowne, King William Parish, present-day Powhatan Co., VA.
iv. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1718 in Henrico Co. or Goochland Co., VA; married Peter Chastain?.
v. Agnes (Agathy) Witt, born Abt. 1730 in Henrico Co. or Goochland Co., VA; died Abt. 1789 in probably Fluvanna Co. (then part of Albemarle Co.), VA; married John Key, Jr. 27 Dec 1750; born Abt. 1731; died Abt. 1789.

Notes for John Key, Jr.:
The following has been copied and pasted from the Burgess Family and Relatives: Daux Family website, http://www.surnames.com/gedcom/burgess_jim/i0000457.htm#i457

6. John Iii3 Key (John_ii2, John_i1) was born in Goochland ??, Va about 1731. John died about 1790 in Bedford/franklin, Virginia.

He married Agnes Witt in St Anne, Albemarle, Virginia, December 27, 1750. Agnes was born in Goochland ??, Va about 1732. She was the daughter of William Guillaume Witt and Elizabeth Daux. Agnes died in Bedford, Virginia. The Virginia Genealogist Volume 8, page 183. Key and Allied Families by Lane. Franklin D Marshall 5450 W 3512 South Salt Lake City, Utah Oquirrh Stake Hunter Ward Family Group Sheet Tax List 1787 Bedford County, Virginia John Key 0 3 2 6 14 John Waller Key 0 1 0 4 3 George Key 0 0 0 1 2 NO BURGESS The Virginia Genealogist Volume 18 Number 1 January-March 1974 Page 6 John and Agnes (Witt) Key, Junior of Amherst and Bedford Counties, Virginia Whose family can be constructed as follows: 1. William Key, born 7 Oct 1751 married Rachel Hansborough, 1775, probably in Amherst County, Virginia 2. George Key, born 1753, married Susannah Craighead, 1785, Bedford County, Virginia 3. John Waller Key, born 175?, married Virginia Wade probably in Bedford County, Virginia 4. Joseph Key, born about 1764, marrid Judith Watts, 1784, Bedford County, Virginia. 5. Elizabeth Key, married Benjamin Watts, 1784, Bedford County, Virginia 6. Barbary Key, married Joseph French, 1784, Bedford County, Virginia 7 Judith Key, married Elijah Mitchell, 1789, Bedford County, Virginia 8. Winney Caudle Key, married Thomas BURGESS, 1789, Bedford County, Virginia. page 7 . . . Agnes Witt married John Key Junior, in Albemarle County, Virginia 27 Dec 1750 and was mentioned as "daughter Agness Key in William Witt's Will, 1754." Albemarle County, Virginia Will Book 2, page 20. page 11 John Key Junior The first known residence of John Key, Junior in old Amherst County was in Lackey's Thoroughfare, on a brance of Davis Creek. He bought 71 acres there in 1764 from Hnery Key, who was identified as his brother and added to it by patents in 1765. (Amherst County, Virginia Deed Book A page 223, Virginia Patent Book 36 pages 839-840. John Key, Junior and James Lackey were ordered to survey for a new road in the area in 1766 Amherst County, Virginia Deed Book 17665-1769 page 14. and in 1768 sold one of his patented tracts Amherst Deed Book B page 278. In 1770he sold the remainder of his land in Lackey's Thoroughfare to John Craighead of Amherst County Deed Book C page 37 and bought 59 acres on the south side of Findlay Mountain near the Glades. Deed Book C page 35. . . . . In Jun 1777 John Key, Junior was appointed surveyor of the road from Findlay Mountain acrross the Glades to Swan Creek Mountain. In November 1777 John Key and Agnes Key sold their land (Deed Book D page 463) and probably moved to Bedford County, Virginia soon thereafter, because in 1778 John Key Junior was replaced as a road surveyor. The first tax list of John Key (He droppeed the Junior) in Bedford County, was in 1782, for six slaves and 427 acres area unknown. In 1783 he purchased 440 acres on the Staunton River in Bedford County Bedford County Virginia Deed Book 7 page 347, probably near Hale's ford which he and his wife sold to John Hook of Franklin in 1788. Deed Book 8 page 110. There is conflicting evidence regarding the last residence of John Key. The last entries for John Key in Bedford County land and personal property tax lists were in 1788 and 1789, respectively and his last recorded action in Bedord County was surety for Judith and Winney Caudle Key in Dec 1789. (Marriage Bond and minister;s return, Bedord Codunty, Virginia Canvas Book and Minister Book. Although there is no entry for John Key in the Franklin land and personal property tax lists, the Franklin County order books show that John Key served as a Juror in Franklin County in 1788 and was sued by John Hook in 1788, traveling a distance of 20 miles to the court house at Rocky Mount Order Book 1789-1793 pages 16, 320, 336. Because of the conflicting evidence, all that can be said is that John Key died in Bedford or Franklin County, Virginia about 1790. Marriage Bonds of Bedford County, Virginia 1755-1800 by Earle S. Dennis and Jane E Smith. Thomas Burgess and Winney Caudle Key, Dec 21, 1789 John Key Surety. George Key and Suckey Craghead, Aug 22, 1785. Robert Cowan Surety. Consent of John Craghead, father of Suckey. George Key and Isbell Kennedy, November 14, 1785, James Kasey, surety. Consent of William Kennedy father of Isbell. George Key and Mary Senter, October 14, 1782. Zachariah Davis, surety. Elijah Michell and Judith Key, December 7, 1789. John Key, Surety. Joshua Turner of Henry County and Milley Key, November 26, 1783. George Key, surety. Bedford County, Virginia Index of Wills 1754 to 1830 Rowland D Buford (No Key Wills) Wyatt Pyron Wyatt Film 1035966 Key Wyatt Film 1035967 #1 The John Key Family Film 0877512 #4 Excellent Film Order this. Key and Allied Families Mrs Julian C Lane Film Fiche 6046778

John Iii Key and Agnes Witt had the following children:

35 i. Elizabeth4 Key was born in Albemarle, Va. Elizabeth died February 16, 1843 in Heard, Georgia. She married Benjamin Watts in Bedford, Va, November 18, 1784. Benjamin was born in Cumberland, Virginia October 5, 1764. Benjamin died March 7, 1840 in Heard, Georgia, at 75 years of age. (See Benjamin Watts for the continuation of this line.)

36 ii. Barbary Barola Key was born in Albemarle, Va. Barbary died in Illinois. She married Joseph French in Bedford, Va, March 9, 1784.

37 iii. Judith Key was born in Albemarle, Va. She married Elijah Mitchell in Bedford, Va, December 7, 1789.

+ 38 iv. John Waller Key was born May 11, 1751.

+ 39 v. William Key was born October 7, 1751.

40 vi. George Key was born in Albemarle, Va 1753. George died 1836 in Callaway, Missouri. He married Susannah Craighead in Bedford, Va, August 22, 1785.

+ 41 vii. Joseph Staunton Key was born about 1764.

42 viii. Wynna Caudle Key was born in Albemarle, Va 1765. Wynna died before 1860 in Logan, Va. She married Thomas Burgess in Bedford, Va, December 21, 1789. Thomas was born in Albemarle, Virginia 1755. He was the son of William Burgess and Susannah Garland_??. Thomas died 1840 in Logan, Virginia. (See Thomas Burgess for the continuation of this line.)

50. Dr. Jean Adam Chastain, born May 1690 in Vevey, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland; died Abt. Nov 1761 in present-day Powhatan County, Virginia USA (then part of Cumberland County). He was the son of 100. Dr. Pierre Jacques Chastain and 101. Suzanne Reynaud. He married 51. Mary Ann David? Bef. 1713 in Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement, present-day Powhatan Co., VA.
51. Mary Ann David?, born 16 Mar 1701 in Mareuil-le-port, France?; died 21 Aug 1724 in present-day Powhatan County, Virginia USA (then part of Cumberland County). She was the daughter of 102. Nicholas David? and 103. Nicole le Coque?.

More About Dr. Jean Adam Chastain:
Census: 1710, Listed on the first tithable list of the Manakin Huguenot settlement. He was still in his father's household then, but was living by himself in 1713.
Christening: 06 May 1690, Vevey. Canton of Vaud, Switzerland
Elected: Bef. 30 Jul 1722, Served on the vestry of King William Parish; was later a Church Warden in 1723; then served as Clerk of the Church from 1723 to 1750, when his entries were noted for being in a fair, legible hand but without great French knowledge.
Emigration: 19 Apr 1700, Embarked on the "Mary and Ann" of London with his parents and 207 Swiss and French refugees.
Ethnicity/Relig.: French Huguenot; assimilated the Anglican/Established Church after settling in Virginia--active church official in King William Parish which served the Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement.
Immigration: 23 Jul 1700, His parents and family arrived at the mouth of the James River in Virginia, settling at Manakin Town in present-day Powhatan County, south of the James River.
Occupation: Was recorded as a physician and had title of Dr. Chastain. His 1762 estate inventory mentioned "a parcel of Physick and French books, " indicating he was a physician by calling, having either learned medicine in Europe and/or apprenticed under his father.
Probate: 25 Jan 1762, Cumberland Co., VA
Property 1: Owned a Negro slave named Charo, named after his father's home town of Charost, France.
Property 2: One of the Chastain family's prized heirlooms is a sword that was originally owned by Jean's father Pierre Chastain which he inherited and passed down to his son Jean, Jr., and then it passed down to Jean's Wheat descendants in Bedford Co., VA.
Property 3: 1715, Patented 90 acres when Refugee Lands were distributed
Property 4: 23 Mar 1717, "John Chastaine" was granted 90 acres of Refugee land adjacent to Jacob Amonet.
Property 5: 15 Aug 1737, Patented 112 acres on lower Monacan Creek, according to Virginia Patent Book 17, p. 406.
Property 6: 18 Jul 1738, Purchased 279 acres on Buck Creek from his future brother-in-law William Salle, according to "Goochland County, Virginia Deeds and Wills, " Vol. 3, p. 149.
Residence: Aft. 1700, Remained in the original French Huguenot settlement of Manakin in present-day Powhatan Co., VA (which at the time of his death was part of Cumberland County).
Will: 22 Dec 1760, Will of John Chastain of King William Parish, Cumberland Co., VA Will Book 1, p. 230. He mentioned his last wife Charlotte Judith and his 8 children, and left at least 11 Negro slaves to his family members.

More About Mary Ann David?:
Burial: 21 Aug 1724, King William Parish, Manakintowne, present-day Powhatan Co., VA

Children of Jean Chastain and Mary David? are:
25 i. Marianne Chastain, born Abt. 1715 in Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement, Goochland (now Powhatan) Co., VA.; died Bef. 1791 in probably Bedford Co., VA; married Benjamin Witt 27 Dec 1731 in Manakintowne, King William Parish, present-day Powhatan Co., VA.
ii. Jean (John) Chastain, Jr., born 26 Sep 1721 in Manakintowne, present-day Powhatan Co., VA; died Abt. Sep 1807 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Frances Branch? Abt. 1753; married (2) Elizabeth Logwood Abt. 1764; born Abt. 1750 in Bedford Co., VA; died 1807 in Bedford Co., VA.

More About Jean (John) Chastain, Jr.:
Burial: Norwood Burks farm, Bedford Co., VA
Census: Jun 1744, Listed on the Tithe List of King William Parish as "Jno. Chastain, Jun." in his father's household.
Elected: 03 Feb 1750, Took oath as a vestryman in King William Parish.
Event: 07 Jun 1760, Jane and Jean Chastain witnessed a deed between R.O. Mosely of Cumberland County to David Leseur of King William Parish.
Military service: Abt. 1778, "John Shasteen" supplied 275 pounds of beef to Bedford County for Revolutionary soldiers.
Probate: 28 Sep 1807, Proved in court by Thomas Logwood; executors were his wife Elizabeth Chastain and her brother Thomas Logwood; will mentioned 11 Negroes.
Property: 24 Mar 1777, According to Bedford Deed Book 5, p. 468, John Chastain of Cumberland County purchased 380 acres on north fork of Otter River in Bedford Co., VA
Residence 1: Abt. 1749, King William Parish, Manakintowne, present-day Powhatan Co., VA
Residence 2: Bef. 1777, Settled in Bedford Co., VA
Will: 25 Jan 1804, Bedford Co., VA

56. Mareen Duvall III, born 24 Oct 1687 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Aft. 1748 in Prince Georges Co., MD?. He was the son of 112. Mareen Duvall the Elder and 113. Frances Stockett. He married 57. Sarah Griffith Abt. 1710.
57. Sarah Griffith, born Abt. 1685 in Calvert Co., MD; died Aft. 1748 in Prince Georges Co., MD?. She was the daughter of 114. Samuel Griffith and 115. Elizabeth ?.

Notes for Mareen Duvall III:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

MAREEN DUVALL3
1687 - 174...

Mareen Duvall, son and heir of Mareen and Frances (Stockett) Duvall, was born October 24, 1687, at "Middle Plantation," South River Hundred. He accompanied his father after 1703, to Prince Georges County, where he is found among the tithables in 1719 and 1733. It has already been shown that the father in the adjustment of his fi­nancial affairs conveyed him any reversion in the estate of Mareen Duvall the Emigrant.
On May 11, 1734, he instituted a resurvey of 212 acres of "Vale of Benjamin" and with 115 acres of surplus land, he received a certificate for 237 acres under the name of "Poplar Ridge," as follows:1

"By virtue of a Special Warrant of Resurvey granted out of his Lordship's Land Office the 3 Instant unto Mareen Duvall Jr. of the afsd County, to resurvey for and in the name of him the said Mareen Duvall part of a Tract of Land Called the Vale of Benjamin Originally on the 10th of June 1671 granted unto a certain Benjamin Wells for the quantity of 1030 acres under now rent who by his Deed of Gift gave the said tract unto a Certain Mary Yate the afsd Mareen Duvall's Grandmother who in like manner gave 212 acres of the same unto Mareen Duvall Sr. and Frances Duvall the aforesaid Mareen Duvall Jr. father and mother under certain Meets and bounds which said Frances is since Dead and by a Deed of Gift from his said father the said 212 acres became the right of the said Mareen Duvall Jr. . . ."

His inheritance from his father was consequently small, and from facts at hand he apparently did not retrieve the family fortune to any great extent. On August 22, 1735, the Rev. Jacob Henderson leased to him, styled Mareen Duvall Senior, Planter, for "rents and covenants herein and hereby paid and observed hath leased and sold and to farm and lett Martha's Choice that lies southward to the road of the dwelling house of the said Jacob Henderson to the chapell containing 150 acres during his natural life and for one bushell of Indian corn on the first of November each year, but at the decease of the said Mareen Duvall the land was to revert to the said Jacob Henderson or his heirs." The lease was made in the presence of Robert Gordon, Justice of the Peace.1a
On April 15, 1738, and December 3, 1741, Mareen Duvall Sr., of Prince Georges County, Planter, by deed of gift conveyed 115 acres of a resurvey to his son, as follows:2

Mareen Duvall Sr., Prince Georges County, Planter "being the lawful heir of my father Mareen Duvall and Frances his wife & Entitled to a portion of a tract called or known by the name of Vale of Benjamin after the death of my said father & mother by a certain deed from my said Father and mother about 13 August 1701 unto John Barrott late of the County, Gent., in trust for me I became possessed of the said tract of land before the death of my father and mother under certain meets and bounds with the liberty to include the Surplus land containing within the said meets and bounds by a resurvey on 3 May 1734. I the said Mareen Duvall Sr. did include 115 acres of surplus land called by the name of Poplar Ridge . . . now Mareen Duvall for love and affections I have and do bear to my son Benjamin . . . all that 115 acres of land . . . but if my eldest son Mareen Duvall Jr. shall die without any issue by him law­fully to be gotten then shall fall to Benjamin. . ."

His wife was Sarah ---, his senior by a few years. The mar­riage occurred about 1710, presumably in Prince Georges County, as the births of three children are registered in Queen Anne's Parish, with no registration in the early home parish of All Hallow's.

Children of Mareen and Sarah Duvall

1. Mary Duvall, born Nov. 2, 1711.
2. Mareen Duvall, born 1714, married Hester Soper. q.v.
3. Samuel Duvall, born 1714, married Eleanor [Pearce]. q.v.
4. Benjamin Duvall, born Oct. 30, 1717, married Anne Griffith, q.v.
5. Zipporah Duvall, married William Hester, q.v.
6. Elizabeth Duvall, born Aug. 24, 1720.

Note: Mary and Elizabeth died spinsters, according to the husband (Enos Duvall Ferguson) of their great-niece. Grafton Duvall stated that tradition re­lated of another daughter who married --- Coale, an Englishman, and lived near Bladensburg and a sister who married William Hester, but he (Ferguson) doubted it as he never heard of these great aunts. As proof exists for Zipporah and her husband, there may be some credence to a Mrs. Coale.

The following depositions prove the birth of twins and give much human interest:3

"June 12, 1748, the Deposition of Sarah Duvall wife of Mareen Duvall Aged sixty three years or thereabouts being Sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Al­mighty God Declareth that on the Twenty Second day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen She was Delivered of two Children When the first was born the Midwife Said it was a boy and She the Deponant Said it should be Called Mareen and is now known by the Name of Mareen Duvall Junr and When the other was born it was a Son Also and his Name She Called Samuel who According Baptized by that Name and Is now known by the name of Samuel Duvall the third Sworn before me the day and year Afforesd"
(signed John Hepburn

"June 12, 1748, The Deposition of Susannah Parker (wife of Peter Parker) aged Sixty Six years or thereabouts being Sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God Declareth that She being Sent for as an Assistant to Sarah Duvall wife of Mareen Duvall in her Travil In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen that She was delivered of two children as the Aforesaid Sarah was told the first born was a boy She said he should be Called Mareen and is now known by the name of Mareen junr and When the Other was born She was told it was a boy also and she said his name Should be Called Samuel and is now known by the name of Samuel Duvall the third and further Saith not."
Sworn to before me the day and year afforesd.
(signed) John Hepburn.

No further records of Mareen and Sarah his wife have been found. His estate was not formally settled, as no letters of administration were granted at his death nor an inventory filed with the Prerogative Court.
__________
SOURCES: 1. Liber E 1 no. 3, folio 430, Land Office; la. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber T, folio 345; 2. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber T, folio 584; Liber Y, folio 415; 3. Queen Anne Parish Register, p. 325.

Children of Mareen Duvall and Sarah Griffith are:
i. Zipporah Duvall, born in Queen Anne Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; married William Hester 10 Dec 1728 in Queen Annes Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD.
ii. Mary Duvall, born 02 Nov 1711.
iii. Samuel Duvall, born 22 Jun 1714 in Queen Anne Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; married Eleanor Pearce.

Notes for Samuel Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

SAMUEL DUVALL THE THIRD4
1714- 17...

Samuel Duvall, son of Mareen Duvall and Sarah his wife, and twin to Mareen Jr., was born June 22, 1714, in Queen Annes Parish, and was popularly known as Samuel the third. In 1733 he was a tithable in the Western Branch Hundred. At one time his seat was "Duvall's Hunting Quarter" of 100 acres which on April 8, 1738, he purchased from John Goodman, of Prince Georges County, for £3.1
His wife was Eleanor --- who was living as late as 1743. It is believed that she was one of the daughters of John Pearce, Gent., of Northampton, Prince Georges County, and thus the granddaughter of Madame Sarah (Sprigg) Pearce-Coomb. In 1700 John Pearce re­ceived a deed of gift for 200 acres of "Northampton," lying on the Western Branch of the Patuxent from his grandfather, Thomas Sprigg, Gent., the original patentee of the tract. John Pearce died intestate in 1766 with a personal estate valued at £258/15/2. Two years later after all obligations had been met, the balance was divided equally among eight unnamed representatives or £32/7/7 each. Six of the heirs have been proved, that is, John Pearce, Ruth wife of Daniel Jenkins, Edward Pearce, William Pearce, Thomas Pearce, and Benjamin Notley Pearce. It is not unlikely that Eleanor wife of Samuel Duvall or her heirs was one of the other two representatives.
The son of Samuel Duvall and Eleanor his wife was given the significant name of John Pearce Duvall and the latter was closely associated with the Sprigg family in the development of the frontier. Among the children of John Pearce Duvall is found the name of Notley which is also found among the sons of his believed maternal grandfather.

John Pearce is the only son documentarily proved for Samuel Duvall, but the Grafton Duvall papers state that there were "other children." The other children are therefore placed through circ*mstantial evi­dence and other factors derived after a thorough overall study of the family.

Children of Samuel and Eleanor Duvall

1. John Pierce Duvall married twice, q.v.
2. Jeremiah Duvall married Eleanor, q.v.
3. William Duvall married twice, q.v.

On June 18, 1743, he sold to Robert Boyde, of Prince Georges County, tailor, for £15 his plantation "Duvall's Hunting Quarter" of 100 acres. His wife, Eleanor, waived dower in the presence of Richard Keene and Joseph Belt Jr.2
On February 3, 1746/7, as Samuel Dewvall ye 3d of Prince Georges, he mortgaged two negro girls to John Magruder for 4,000 pounds of tobacco, with lawful interest, in the presence of John Contee. On February 27, 1747/8, he mortgaged the same slaves, that is, Hannah and Jeany, to James Wardrop for 5,248 pounds of tobacco, before Richard Keene, a Justice of the Peace. And on March 14, same year, James Wardrop assigned his rights in the mortgage to Mareen Duvall Jr.3
On September 23, 1751, signing the instrument in his own hand writing, he made a deed of gift of personal property to his son, John Pierce Duvall, which was witnessed by Sarah Belt and acknowledged the same day before Edward Sprigg. This recorded chattel deed is the only medium by which an heir is documentarily proved. The son had the instrument recorded at court on October 6, same year.4
No further record has been found in Maryland unless he was the Samuel Duvall who was among the petitioners in 1758 to divide Prince George (Rock Creek) Parish. It is not known whether he died intestate in Maryland and his property was settled privately among his representatives or whether he accompanied his son to Virginia and died there. Anyhow he left behind a very distinguished son.

Note: It has been stated generally and certainly incorrectly that Samuel Duvall removed to Virginia, married secondly Nancy Claiborne, and became the father of at least six additional children. Mrs. Grabrowski in her book on the Duvalls of Virginia states emphatically that the Samuel who married Nancy was not a descendant of Mareen Duvall, but the son of a Daniel Duvall who lived at one time in York County. She prints in full the will of Samuel Duvall of Henrico County which does not mention a son John Pierce.
William Duvall, son of Samuel of Henrico Co., by his own deposition under oath stated that he was born in King William Co., Va., on Sept. 4, 1748. There is a record that Samuel Duvall's wife, Eleanor, was living as late as June 18, 1743, which would allow time for her death and the remarriage of her spouse in order to become a father by Sept. 4, 1748. We do know, however, that Samuel Duvall was domiciled in Maryland as late as September 23, 1751, for the deed of gift stated definitely "Samuel Duvall of Prince Georges County, Planter."
__________
SOURCES: 1. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber T, folio 624; 2. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber Y, folio 681; 3. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber EE, folios 136, 373; 4. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber PP, folio 139.

iv. Mareen Duvall IV, born 22 Jun 1714 in Queen Anne Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died Abt. 1783 in Prince Georges Co., MD; married Hester Soper Abt. 1741.

Notes for Mareen Duvall IV:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

MAREEN DUVALL, GENT.4
1714-1783

Mareen Duvall Junior, son of Mareen Duvall and Sarah his wife, of the Western Branch, was born June 22, 1714, in Queen Anne Parish, Prince Georges County. After December 1, 1740, but before November 27, 1741, he married Hester, daughter of John Soper, but at that time the widow of John Lowe.
The personal estate of John Lowe was inventoried on December 1, 1740, showing an appraisal of £34/13/3. George Lowe and Wil­liam Lowe approved as the next of kin, when Hester Lowe the ad­ministratrix filed papers at court in Prince Georges County on March 27, 1741.1 On November 27, 1741, Mareen Duvall who had married the widow filed an account, reporting a balance of £25/3/7.2
John Soper whose seat was likewise on "Vale of Benjamin" died testate and by his will of November 29, 1742, he devised his daughter, Hester Duvall, an unnamed tract of land purchased from Charles Williams and appointed his son-in-law, Mareen Duvall Jr., the execu­tor.3

Children of Mareen and Esther (Soper) Duvall

1. Keziah Duvall, married Cornelius Duvall of Mareen. q.v.
2. Anne Duvall, married James Soper. q.v.
3. [Alvin] Duvall, died before his father without lawfull issue.

On May 25, 1744, he rendered an account upon the estate of his father-in-law, showing a balance of £104/2/8, with specific disburse­ments to Robert Soper, Robert Lashley, John James, Phillis Low, and James Shaw. An additional account on November 21, 1746, reported legacies to the following heirs: William Ellis who married the deceased daughter Priscilla; Daughter Leah Soper who died during her minority therefore her part descended to her several representatives, that is, brother John Soper, brother Robert Soper, sister Mary James, sister Phillis Lowe, Robert Lashley who married her sister Lucy, John Shaw who married her sister Aqquilla, and this accountant who married her sister Esther.4
He manifested his patriotism in 1778 by subscribing to the oath of Allegiance in Prince Georges County before Magistrate Benjamin Hall.5 The year before he had been appointed Constable of Horsepen Hun­dred, Prince Georges County.6
According to the Debt Books, he remitted quit rents regularly on "Vale of Benjamin" and "Poplar Hill." On June 27, 1767, he and Hester his wife conveyed to Charles Burgess of the second part and John Rogers of the third part "by advice and consent of John Rogers" 50 acres of land beginning at a bound tree of Charles Williams, deceased, which had been conveyed by Charles Williams to John Soper who had devised it to his daughter, Hester. The consideration so expressed was £35.7 On August 18, 1781, for a rental of 1200 pounds of tobacco annually he leased a portion of "Vale of Benjamin," adjoining the tract "Greenwood," to John McCoy of Prince Georges County.8
He died in 1783. His will, dated December 30, 1780, was proved in Prince Georges County, on September 9, 1783, by G. H. Warman, William Thomas, and John MacGill Read. He bequeathed personalty to Catherine Mitchell and Walter Mitchell, and one shilling each to his daughter Keziah Duvall and her husband Cornelius Duvall and to his daughter Anne Soper and her husband James Soper, and to his friend Christopher Lowndes. The residuary estate was bequeathed to his grandson Mareen Duvall Soper.9
His personal estate was inventoried on October 27, 1783, at £580/19/11, and returned at court by Thomas Mitchell and James Soper, the executors. John Sprigg approved as the creditor.10
In or about 1784 James Soper instituted action in the Court of Chancery against Thomas Mitchell, the co-executor of the estate of Mareen Duvall, late of Prince Georges County, deceased, inasmuch as Mitchell had conveyed to --- Mackabee a bond which allegedly damaged Soper. It was set forth that Mareen Duvall by his will had devised certain property as well as provided for 7 years of education for Walter Mitchell, the illegitimate child of the testator's deceased son by Catherine Mitchell and had made the child's uncle, Thomas Mitchell, one of the executors of the estate. Both executors likewise became guardian to Walter. James Soper stated that he lived in Montgomery County and had permitted Thomas Mitchell to administer upon the estate without his approval and had accepted Mitchell's bond to educate and board Walter Mitchell for 5 years. He, however, had approved certain disbursem*nts to Mitchell for the ward which, accord­ing to the bill of complaint, exceeded the stipulations in the benefactor's will.11
__________
SOURCES: 1. Box 12, folio 18, Hall of Records; 2. Adm. Accts. Liber 18, folio 40; 3. Wills, Liber 23, folio 77; 4. Adm. Accts., Liber 20, folio 221; Liber 22, folio 440; 5. Brumbaugh's Md. Records, vol. 2, p. 274; 6. Brumbaugh & Hodges' Md. Revolutionary Records, p. 27; 7. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber BB no. 2, folio 77; 8. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber FF no. 1, folio 191; 9. Wills, Liber T no. 1, folio 174, Marlborough; 10. Inventories, Liber S T no. 2, folio 130; 11. Chancery Papers no. 4703, Land Office.

28 v. Benjamin Duvall, born 30 Oct 1717 in Prince Georges Co., MD; died Abt. 1792 in Franklin Co., VA; married Anne Griffith in Maryland.
vi. Elizabeth Duvall, born 24 Aug 1720.

58. Samuel Griffith, Jr., born Abt. 1681 in Calvert Co., MD; died 1741 in Calvert Co., MD. He was the son of 114. Samuel Griffith and 115. Elizabeth ?. He married 59. Ann Skinner Abt. 1730.
59. Ann Skinner, born Abt. 1710 in Calvert Co., MD?. She was the daughter of 118. Clarke Skinner and 119. Ann ?.

Children of Samuel Griffith and Ann Skinner are:
i. Benjamin Griffith, died Abt. 1751 in Calvert Co., MD.
ii. Rebecca Griffith, born 25 Dec 1729 in Calvert Co., MD; died 13 Oct 1810 in Frederick Co., MD; married Notley Thomas; born Abt. 1722; died 26 May 1767 in Frederick Co., MD.

More About Rebecca Griffith:
Burial: Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Frederick Co., MD

More About Notley Thomas:
Burial: Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Frederick Co., MD

29 iii. Anne Griffith, born Abt. 1731 in Calvert Co., MD?; died Aft. 1792 in Franklin Co., VA; married Benjamin Duvall in Maryland.
iv. Bathsheba Griffith, born Abt. 1739 in Calvert Co., MD; died Abt. 1800 in Monongalia Co., VA (now in WV); married John Ferguson Abt. 1751; born Abt. 1725; died Abt. 1793 in Monongalia Co., VA (now in WV).

Generation No. 7

64. (probably) James Overstreet, born in England?; died Aft. 1703 in King and Queen Co., VA?.

Children of (probably) James Overstreet are:
32 i. (probably) John Overstreet, died Bef. 1743 in King and Queen Co., VA; married (possibly) Elizabeth ?.
ii. (possibly) William Overstreet, born Abt. 1714 in King and Queen Co., VA?; died Abt. 1757 in Prince Edward Co., VA.

68. John Stone, born Abt. 1667 in Rugeley, Staffordshire, England?; died Abt. 1736 in Caroline Co., VA. He married 69. Mary O'Brissell 10 Nov 1687 in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex Co., VA.
69. Mary O'Brissell

Notes for John Stone:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Stone-1277

John "The Immigrant" Stone
Born about 1667 in Rugeley, Staffordshire, Englandmap
ANCESTORS ancestors
Son of Richard Stone [uncertain] and Dorothy (Belcher) Stone [uncertain]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of Mary Wilkins — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of Mary (O'Brissell) Stone — married 10 Nov 1687 in Christchurch, Middlesex, Co., Virginiamap
DESCENDANTS descendants
Father of Esther Stone (Stone) Watts, Sarah (Stone) Hubbard, William Stone and Nicholas Stone
Died about 1736 in Caroline Co., Virginia Colonymap
Profile managers: Betty Hewett private message [send private message] and Dusty Boren private message [send private message]
Profile last modified 1 Mar 2020 | Created 28 May 2011
This page has been accessed 1,713 times.

This profile is part of the Stone Name Study.
Biography
John Stone, the Immigrant, received a land grant in 1725 in what was to become Caroline Co, Virginia. John died in 1736, and his wife Mary was the executor of the estate. His estate was probated on 13-JAN-1737 in Caroline Co, Virginia.

Children
John Stone 1690-
Sarah Stone c1698-?; m. John Hubbard[1]
William Stone of Caroline Co, VA 1700-1775
Nicholas Stone the Quaker 1703-1778
Eusebius Stone -
Stephen Stone -1778[2]
Sources
? baulch.us
? Extracted from Balcro.com
Annotation: For the majority of entries, date and port reflect date of the transportation or apprenticeship orders and the intended destination. Information was extracted from English records of apprenticeship bindings or criminal transportation orders and from Source Bibliography.
COLDHAM, PETER WILSON. The Complete Book of Emigrants: A Comprehensive Listing Compiled from English Public Records of Those Who Took Ship to the Americas for Political, Religious, and Economic Reasons; of Those Who Were Deported for Vagrancy, Roguery, or Non-Conformity; and of Those Who Were Sold to Labour in the New Colonies. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. 1661-1699; 1990, p. 894; Place: America; Year: 1680; Page Number: 359
Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2012.
Original data: National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex, Co., Virginia from 1653 to 1812. Richmond, VA, USA: Christ Church, 1897.
Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940, database, Stone and Mary O. Brissell, 10 Nov 1687; citing Christchurch, Middlesex. See: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V299-Q3Q
https://www.balcro.com/stone.html (See Research Notes)
http://www.baulch.us/JohnStone.pdf
Research Notes
This Stone family researcher, Mark Stone, went to Rugeley, England himself and looked through the library's copies of the Parish Register. Nowhere in those records did he find any proof that Richard [Stone-1277] of Rugeley was the father of John [Stone-7196] of Virginia (abt 1667-1736). This is in direct opposition to information found at the balcro.com site. See: https://www.ancestry.com/boards/surnames.stone/7035/mb.ashx If anyone locates a record proving John's parentage, please let me know. Thank you, dusty [Boren-314]

Children of John Stone and Mary O'Brissell are:
34 i. William Stone, born Abt. 1700 in Middlesex Co., VA?; died Abt. 1775 in Caroline Co. or Stafford Co., VA?; married Elizabeth Ann ?.
ii. Nicholas Stone, born Abt. 1703 in Middlesex Co., VA?; died Abt. 1778 in Anson Co., NC; married Mary Diggs.

Notes for Nicholas Stone:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Stone-5877

Biography

Nicholas was a Friend (Quaker)
Nicholas was born in Virginia about 1703. He died in North Carolina about 1778. He married Mary Diggs.

CHAPTER: 004: Nicholas Stone the Quaker
Nicholas Stone the Quaker is a well known person genealogically because a fair amount of information is available about him from the early day Quaker records of Virginia and North Carolina. He and his family were members of the Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting of Quakers in Hanover Co, Virginia. History records that this group of Quakers strongly stirred up all of Virginia in favor of religious liberty and then later in favor of anti-slavery. Both of these movements were at their height just prior to the American Revolutionary War which began about 1775. They fled to North Carolina to avoid the persecution of the Quakers.[1]

Timeline
11-JUN-1740, Nicholas Stone the Quaker, first has his name appearmin the records of Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting. The name of his wife, Mary Diggs Stone, first appears on 27-JUN-1740.

10-MAY-1740 he gave 5"0 "shillings?" to help Quakers in London.

14-JUN-1742 Nicholas Stone the Quaker of Caroline Co, Virginia suffered seizure of his property for failure to tithe to the Church of England.[2]

Known Children:[2]

Agnes, m. Joseph Crew on 11 Oct 1743 in Caroline, Virginia
Christian, m. Francis Clarke, Jr. on 14 Oct 1746 in Caroline, Virginia
Elizabeth (Stone) Clark, m. Christopher Clark on 15 Mar 1752 in Caroline, Virginia
John, b. 1728 in Caroline; m. Lucy Clark on 14 Feb 1756 in Louisa, Virginia
DNA
Paternal relationship is confirmed through Y-chromosome DNA testing. Bo Stone FTDNA kit #838135, and his 6th cousin twice removed, a son of Orbie Stone, FTDNA kit #444533, match at a Genetic Distance of 1 on 37 markers thereby confirming their direct paternal lines back to their MRCA John Stone. FTDNA indicates that the probability the two share a common ancestor within the last 7 generations is 95.73% and within the last 8 generations is 97.28%.

Sources
? [1] Balcro.com
? 2.0 2.1 Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume VI, Virginia. Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting pg 273 subscription required
https://www.geni.com/people/Nicholas-Stone-the-Quaker/6000000014794506080

iii. Esther Stone
iv. Sarah Stone

72. Richard Turner, born Bet. 1648 - 1668 in England?; died Abt. 1742 in Caroline Co., VA.

Notes for Richard Turner:
From "Some Southern Appalachian Ancestors & Old World Roots" http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jbturner&id=I6916
Entries: 27517 Updated: 2010-07-14 00:45:56 UTC (Wed) Contact: J

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THIS IS ALL I HAVE ~ COPYRIGHT (C) 1980 - 2010, NathanHouseBooks.com

Many sources have made the extreme error of assuming Richard and his kin were not from Cornwall, and that there are no parrish records of Turners in Cornwall in his day. Indeed, some have mentioned that the government records office in Cornwall has provided correspondence to suggest this. However, such do exist, while civil records also exist such as tax rolls.

Some have assumed that these Turners were Scottish and came somehow to VA in the 1690's. There is no record of them being in Scotland or being among the Turners who were part of Clan Lamont. Recent DNA studies also tend to go against such a theory.

RECORDS FROM ST BLAZEY PARISH, CHURCH OF ENGLAND, (CORNWALL), 1608-1837:

1695 26th May shows a Richard Turner as being one of the Churchwardens. Richard and Anthony Turner who paid tax of 8/4d [8 shillings and 4 pence] each.. (Found on FHL Film # 0916884.)

OTHER CORNWALL, ENGLAND, RECORDS:

A tax was paid by Richard Turner of £10 for a tenement in Trethosa. (Year unclear.) There are several fields on the farm with names like "Turner's Close."

VIRGINIA RECORDS:

1704:
Richard appeared on a property tax list in King and Queen Co., VA.

1717:
Richard patented land in the area of Reedy Swamp and Mattaponi River in King William Co., VA, (the portion that later became Caroline Co.)

18 Nov. 1721:
Richard patented an additional 380 acres in St. John's Parrish, on the branches of Jack Pond Swamp and Polecat Creek in King William Co., VA. The area later became part of Caroline Co. in 1727.

1742:
Richard died before 11 March 1742, as that is the date his will was proven in Caroline Co., VA.

CAROLINE CO., VA, RECORDS (Provided by Ms. Cathy Roberts:)

12 Nov. 1736 Richard Turner acknowledged deeds to sons Lewis, John and James12 May 1738. Richard Turner acknowledged deed of gift to son Richard Turner, Jr.8 Oct 1742. The last will and testament of Richard Turner was presented in Court by Elizabeth Turner, executrix therein named, and it appearing that lands are devised by the will, the Court appoints the next Court for proving the same. It's ordered that Richard Turner, son and heir of the deceased, be summoned to be present at the proving of the will.12 Nov 1742. The Court proceeded to the proof of Richard Turner's will (Richard Turner the heir at law being present), which being proved by Samuel Norment and John Tounsend, two of the witnesses, is ordered to be recorded. And Elizabeth Turner having taken the oath of an executrix, certificate is granted her for obtaining a probate thereof. James Turner, being appointed executor of the will, renounced his executorship. Ordered that Samuel Norment, Titus Hurt, John Sutton and John Johns appraise the estate of Richard Turner.11 Mar 1742/3. The last will and testament of Richard Turner was presented in Court by Marg. Turner and Lewis Turner, executrix and executor therein named, and James Turner, the heir at law, consented to the wills' being proved. Proved by Hugh Noden, Gent., Wm. Norment and Charles Noden, witnesses thereto. Ordered that William Whitlock, Henry Burk, John Dudley and John George appraise the estate of Richard Turner.13 Feb 1752An unk. (?) Richard Turner [a cousin?] and Nancy his wife acknowledge their deed indented to Richd. Correy11 Jun 1752. James Turner and Mary his wife acknowledged their deed indented to Benj. Graves .Based on those court order records, it seems to me that there were two elder Richard Turners -- one who was the father of James, John and Lewis, and one who was the father of Richard. Based on the name of Richard's wife, I believe that the younger Richard Turner is the one who was in Bedford County and has been misidentified in more than a few genealogies as being a son of James Turner. Some researchers suggest the two older Richard Turners are cousins. All the various genealogies that I've read have given Jubal as a son of Admire. However, there are two of James and Mary's sons that I've never seen a list of chidren on -- Isaiah and Nathan, and, while I've seen a partial list, I don't have in my records a listing of the children of James Turner, Jr. So, it's very possible that either one of them could have had a child with that name. Also, there were other Turner's in Bedford County -- ones that I have never researched (two that come to mind are George Turner, whose will was recorded in 1824, and Ambrose Turner, whose will was recorded in 1823), and the other Jubal(s) could be related to one of them. Another person who was researching the line of Elijah Turner gave me a listing of Elijah's children, and she also had Jubal listed, with him getting married in 1818. Her line didn't follow down from Jubal, so she didn't go into any details on where he and his siblings ended up living. The marriage that she showed was the Jubal Turner/Milly Ross marriage, and I don't know why she has that one as opposed to the earlier Jubal Turner/Frances Tucker. I don't know if this researcher thought they were two different Jubals, or if her research had missed the earlier marriage.

Abstracts from Caroline County Order Book
Caroline County Order Book 1732-1740
12 OCT 1732 - On the petition of John Townsend to choose
William Sutton as his guardian, John Turner be summoned to
court. (pg 43)
12 NOV 1736 - Richard Turner acknowledged his deed of land to
his son Lewis Turner. Richard Turner acknowledged his
deed of land to his son John Turner. Richard Turner
acknowledged his deed of land to his son James Turner. (pg 379)
12 MAY 1738 - Richard Turner acknowledges his deed of gift to
his son Richard Turner, Jr. (pg 477)
Caroline County Order Book 1740-1744
12 NOV 1742 - The court proceeded to the proof of Richard
Turner's will (Richard Turner the heir at law being present),
which being proved by Samuel Norment and John Tounsend, two of
the witnesses, is ordered to be recorded. And Elizabeth
Turner having taken the oath of executrix, certificate is
granted her for obtaining a probate thereof. James Turner,
being appointed executor of the will, renounced the executorship.
Ordered that Samuel Norment, Titus Hurt, John Sutton and John
Johns appraise the estate of Richard Turner. (pg 134)
11 MAR 1742/3 - The last will and testament of Richard Turner
was presented in court by Margt. Turner and Lewis Turner,
executrix and executor therein named, and James Turner, the
heir at law, consented to the wills' being proved. Proved by
Hugh Noden, Gent., Wm. Norment and Charles Noden, witnesses thereto.
Ordered that William Whitlock, Henry Burk, John Dudley
and John George appraise the estate of Richard Turner. (pg 159)
Caroline County Order Book 1744-1746
11 JAN 1744/5 - Meshach Turner being admitted to choose a
guardian made choice of James Turner, who with Samuel
Norment acknowledged their bond. Abednego Turner being admitted
to choose a guardian made choice of Wm. Pemberton,
who with Robt. Powell acknowledged their bond. Elizabeth Turner
being admitted to choose a guardian made choice of
Jason Meadows, who with Lewis Turner acknowledged their bond.
Sarah Turner being admitted to choose a guardian made
choice of Jonas Meadows who with Lewis Turner acknowledged
their bond. (pg 344)
12 APR 1745 - John Turner vs Joseph Street dismissed, being
agreed. (pg 463)
27 MAY 1745 - The last will and testament of Lewis Turner was
presented by John Turner executor therein named, and
proved by Richard Turner and John Johns, two of the witnesses. The
executor with Thomas Johnson, Gent., his security and bond. (pg 83)
Caroline County Order Book 1746-1754
12 OCT 1752 - Thomas Turner and Eliz his wife acknowledge their
deed to Geo Holloway. James Turner and Mary his
wife acknowledge deed to Edmond Jones. (pg 350)
----------------------------------
Caroline County was formed in 1728 from Essex, King and Queen,
and King William Counties. From VA Land Grant
records:

1 APR 1717 - John Sutton, Richard Mauldin and Thomas Terry
granted 600 acres in King William County, adj. Richard
Turner (and others)
13 NOV 1721 - Richard Turner granted 380 acres in King William
Co, St. John's Parish, on branches of Jack Pond Swamp
and Polecat Swamp.
13 NOV 1721 - Richard Turner granted 400 acres in King William
County, above the ranger's path by N. side of Reedy
Swamp. (Same day, Samuel Norment was granted 325 acres above
mouth of Reedy Swamp)
The 1704 Quit Rent List of Virginia shows:
Richard Turner 200 acres King and Queen County
Thomas Turner 267 acres King and Queen County

Children of Richard Turner are:
i. John Turner, born Abt. 1695 in England or Caroline Co., VA?; died Abt. 1742 in Caroline Co., VA; married Elizabeth Brashears 01 Jul 1718 in Queen Anne's Parrish, Prince Georges Co., MD; born 26 Jul 1699 in Prince Georges Co., MD; died 1794 in , VA, USA.

Notes for John Turner:
It is suggested by some that he may have been born in Virginia. The only shadow of doubt cast over this is the possibility that the Richard Turner on a 1695 tax roll in Cornwall may have been his father Richard.

It is now known that Shadrack, Meshack and Abednego Turner were actually brothers, and sons of John Turner, born in Caroline County, Virginia.

Principally, the connection to John, and to his father Richard, comes from the Turner DNA Group Study begun in 2002, as well as information taken from the Caroline County, Virginia, Order Book from 1744.

Based on the fact that John died before the 1742 probate of his father Richard's estate; the death of his wife around 1744 resulted in their children being assigned to a guardian. The 1744 Order Book lists Meshack, Abednego, Sarah, Elizabeth and Ann with guardianships. Shadrach would already have been 16 at the time, and legally no longer requiring a guardian.

Abstracts from Caroline County, Virginia, Order Book, 1732-1740:

11 JAN 1744/5 - "Meshach Turner being admitted to choose a guardian made choice of James Turner, who with Samuel Norment acknowledged their bond. Abednego Turner being admitted to choose a guardian made choice of Wm. Pemberton, who with Robt. Powell acknowledged their bond."

"Elizabeth Turner [granddaughter of Richard, and daughter of John] being admitted to choose a guardian made choice of Jason Meadows, who with Lewis Turner [son of Richard] acknowledged their bond." [Notice that a relative, a Micajah Turner born 1728 who lived in Cumberland Co., VA, also had sons named Lewis and John. This is not the same Micajah who was a grandson or great-grandson of John, born 1777.]

"Sarah Turner [daughter of John, granddaughter of Richard] being admitted to choose a guardian made choice of Jonas Meadows [aka Meadors, Meador*] who with Lewis Turner acknowledged their bond."

More About John Turner:
Name 2: John TURNER
Date born 2: Abt. 1690, Cornwall, England, or Virginia
Died 2: Abt. 1742, , Caroline, VA
Record Change: 12 Jan 2010

Notes for Elizabeth Brashears:
Elizabeth was the daughter of Samuel Brashears and Ann Jones. This family line begins with Barthelemy De Jorcas Brassier (1498 - 1527) and his wife Esprite Choiselant (1507 - 1530) , of France. Reportedly, about the time Elizabeth and her siblings were born, the spelling changed from Brassier to Brashears.

More About Elizabeth Brashears:
Record Change: 12 Jan 2010

36 ii. James Turner, born Abt. 1700 in Caroline Co., VA?; died Abt. 1793 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Admire?.
iii. Lewis Turner, died Abt. 1745 in Caroline Co., VA.
iv. Richard Turner, Jr.

96. John Witt, born Abt. 1645 in Ross Wye, Herefordshire, England?; died Abt. 1715 in Shirley Hundred, Charles City Co., VA. He married 97. Ann Daux Oct 1669 in Charles City Co., VA.
97. Ann Daux, born Abt. 1650 in possibly Charles City Co., VA. She was the daughter of 194. Walter Daux and 195. Mary Feb?.

Notes for John Witt:
The following has been copied and pasted from the Burgess Family and Relatives: Daux Family website, http://www.surnames.com/gedcom/burgess_jim/i0000457.htm#i457

2. John_i2 Witt (Robert1 Whytt) was born in Herefordshire, England 1645. John_i died 1715 in Charles City County, Virginia.

He married Ann Daux in Charles City, Virginia, about 1669. Ann was born in Of Charles Count, Virginia about 1645. She was the daughter of Walter Daux and Mary. Notes from June B Marchman 2579 Brookshire Ave, Winter Park, Florida 32792-4731 ROSS PARISH, Church of England, in Cork County, Ireland created ca 1580's for English settlers in 1580's during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.1 Ross-on-Wye, a placee or parish on River Wye in Herefordshire, England; near Bristol, a place apparently designated as "home" for Irish settlers chased out of Ireland several times in late 1580's 90's by angry Irish Catholics (sponsored by Spain, England's enemy in that era). Some settlers remained back in England and others returned to their home sites in Cork.2 Richard Whitt, probate of his Will, 1627, made at Cork County and Ross Parish. No further info available from either Cork or from the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin. John Witts of Ross, Hereford Diocese, (on Wye River) an innkeeper, his will record dated 1 Mar 1621; estate left to his wife Joane and his daughter Joane; will proved 8 Apr 1622.4 Our proved ancestor John Witt/Whitt out of Ross-Wye (Ross on Wye) Herefordshire, England emigrated to Virginia in 1659. Researchers agreed in the mid-1980's that he was born ca 1645. He lived past 1715, a resident of Charles City County, Virginia (near present Richmond City). Given his approximate date of birth (1645) this John Witt/Whitt would not have been a son of either of the two men mentioned above: Richard Whitt of Ross, Cork, Ireland or John Witts of Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, England inasmuch as both these men died in the 1620's. These men may be considered as the grand father ofr our proved John W.!! Remember: The one definite connection we have inthis info is that John Witts )d 1622 lived at site or starting point of this trek to America in 1659 of our Ancestor John Witt/Whitt.5 In the papers and data I have accumulated on the Witt/Whitt etc in pre-1650 Europe, one item of great interest stands out, that being the baptism date - - 1645 of infant Jon Whyt in Sterling, Kilseth near Edinburgh, a port in Scotland. The father of Jon was Robert Whyt. The surname spelled several ways such as Whyt, Whytt, QWytt, etc. was new in that locale, the first lised there inthe early 1640's Rbt Whytt of Stirling, Falkire in 1643. The names of his relatives near Edinburgh included Thomas Whitt, father of infants Archibald and Bessie in the 1660's. Note these names may be found among descendants of our John Witt of Virginia. Another entry that seems to list students or altar boys in 1653 included John QWhyt in Stirling, Kilseth.6 References: 1 & 2 British Museum and Library Records. 3. Letter 23 Jan 1986 to Jane C. Whitt from Public Record Office, Dublin Ireland. 4. Letter 4 Mar 1992 to Kathy Whitt from Gen M. Tonkin, Herefordshire, England 5. The Hueguenot No.32 1985-87 by J.C. Whitt. 6. LDS-Scotland, Annandale, Virginia Virginia LDS records room. From Virginia Colonial Abstract 18 re Wm Claiborne: Robert Whytt Accomack County, Virginia 1636. Robert Whytt, Mariner, . . .on ... 5 Sep 1636 (at) Court of Acchowmacke. . . Capt Claiborne "I Wm Clayborne being Sec. of State. Phillip Taylor planter of Acchowmacke compained against Robert Whytt, mariner. . . 2,000 lbs tobbaco. lost by casualty. . .'Isle of Kenty 6 & 20 1636 (s) Wm Clayborne on 5 Sep 1636. Reserached by Jane Chapman Whitt, wife of Samuel S. Whitt, 3332 Glenmore Drive, Falls Church, Virginia 22041. Virginia Land Patents 1682-1689-1695 Charles City County, Virginia Indenture 14 Sep 1715 This indenture, made this 14th day of September in the year of our Lord God, One Thousand seven hundred and fifteen, betweeen Charles Hudson and Mary his wife, of the County of Charles Citty of the one part and Jon. Witt and Wm Witt of hte smae county of the other part Witnesseth: that where as the said Charles Hudson and Mad Mary, hiw wife, be indenture bearing the day before the date here of and with the consideration there on expressed hath bargained and sold Jon Witt and Wm Witt, their executors and administrators one tract or parsel of land containing three hundred acres, more or less, lying and being in the county of Honaricho at a place called Tuckahoe and bounded as in the daid indenture is unto the said JnoWitt and Wm Witt their executors and administrators from the day before the date of the said recited indentures unto the end and term the statuet possession of said land and premises and be enabled to acfept and take a grant and release of the Roversion and inheritance thereof to them and their heirs to the use of them their heirs and assigns as by the said recited indenture of has more at large appeareth. . . . . . . for and in consideration of the sum of five pounds, sterling, to hem in hand payd by the sd JOhn Witt and William Witt where of they do acknowledge the recipt had granted. . . . . In witness wereof the said Charles Hudson and Mary, his wife hath hereunto sett their hands and affixed their seals the day and year above written. At a court held for Henrico county the 3rd day of October 1715. Charles Hudson acknowleded this Deed to be in his act and deed and whereupon the same was admitted to record. Then Mary, his wife being first privately examined relinquished her right of Dower in the land above mentioned, which was also admitted to Record. Notes The Harbours in America by Williams My Virginia Kin Our Ancestors Families, Ohio Society Colonial Dames Joyce Witt Mildred Trulin

John_i Witt and Ann Daux had the following children:

3 i. Sarah3 Witt. She married Thomas Harbour. (See Thomas Harbour for the continuation of this line.)

+ 4 ii. John_ii Witt was born 1675.

+ 5 iii. William Guillaume Witt was born about 1680.

6 iv. Edward Witt was born in Charles City Cou, Virginia 1685. Edward died after 1752. He married Mary Elizabeth.

7 v. Charles Witt was born in Charles City, Virginia 1685.

8 vi. Richard Witt was born in Charles City County, Virginia 1690. Richard died 1764 in Bute, North Carolina. He married three times. He married Elizabeth Liptrot. He married Regina Witt in Henrico, Virginia, 1736. He married Mary Kimbrough about 1748.

9 vii. Littlebury Witt was born in Charles City, Virginia 1700. Littlebury died 1784 in Charles City, Virginia

More About John Witt:
Event 1: 03 Oct 1673, Sued the County on behalf of his wife for inherited estate from Walter Daux
Event 2: Feb 1687, Work order issued to clear and lay a road from the Chickahominy down toward James River. This road connected the main road (current Route 5) near John Witt's land.
Event 3: 1695, In Henrico Co., VA, suit against Ralph Hudspeth. Henrico County Order Book #3.

Children of John Witt and Ann Daux are:
i. John Witt, Jr., born Abt. 1670 in Charles City Co., VA; died Abt. 1751 in Goochland Co., VA; married Ann Rogers.
48 ii. William Witt, born Abt. 1675 in Shirley Hundred, Charles City Co., VA; died Jun 1754 in present-day Fluvanna (then Albemarle) Co., VA; married ? Abt. 1708.
iii. Edward Witt, born Abt. 1685 in Charles City Co., VA; died Aft. 1752 in probably Halifax Co., VA; married Mary Eliza.
iv. Richard Witt, born Abt. 1690 in Charles City Co., VA or Henrico Co., VA; died Abt. 1764 in Bute Co., NC; married (1) Elizabeth Liptrot; married (2) Mary Kimbrow.
v. Littlebury Witt, born Abt. 1700.

100. Dr. Pierre Jacques Chastain, born Apr 1659 in Charost, Berri, France; died 1728 in present-day "Monacan Farm," 1000 Huguenot Trail across from Manakin Episcopal Church, Powhatan County, Virginia USA (then Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement in Goochland County). He was the son of 200. Estienne Chastain and 201. Jeanne Laurent. He married 101. Suzanne Reynaud 27 Jan 1687 in Saint Cyr Issoudun Catholic Church.
101. Suzanne Reynaud, born Abt. 1666 in Issoudon, Berri, France; died 1700 in high seas on voyage to America. She was the daughter of 202. Jacques Reynault? and 203. Anne Jupille?.

Notes for Dr. Pierre Jacques Chastain:
The following is a brief biography of Dr. Pierre Chastain copied and pasted from the Pierre Chastain Family Association website:

The year was 1659 when Pierre Chastain was born in the ancient Province of Berry, in or near the village of Charost, which is almost the geographic center of France. Pierre Chastain was the son of Estienne Chastain and Jeanne Laurent. Pierre's father, Estienne and this grandfather, Jacques Chastain, had both served as notaire royal at Charost. Estienne was born circa 1625, the son of Jacques and Jeanne Audet Chastain. It is thought that Jacques, born circa 1598-1600, was either the son or grandson of the Estienne Chastain who fled the city of Bourges at the time of the Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day in 1572. Proof of Pierre's first wife comes from the registers of Vevey in cantonal archives in Lausanne, Switzerland. This proof also corrects the assumption that Magdalaine de la Rochefaucald was Pierre's first wife. Pierre Chastain married Susanne Reynaud, daughter of Pierre Reynaud, from the village of Issoudun. By 1696, the Pierre Chastain family had fled from Charost across the Jura Mountains to Vevey, Canton Vaud, Switzerland to escape religious persecution. Sometime after September 1698, the family departed Vevey and was found at The Hague in The Netherlands (Holland). From there, the family moved to London, England where they remained a short time while Pierre became active in gathering together a group of French Huguenot refugees for colonization in Virginia. Pierre Chastain, his wife Susanne Reynaud Chastain and five children were among the group of 207 passengers who embarked from Gravesend, England on April 19, 1700 aboard the ship Mary and Ann of London. This ship arrived at the mouth of the James River on July 12, 1700. The group settled in Manakin, Virginia about twenty miles up the James River. The group was given a 10,000 acre tract of land south of the James in an area once occupied by the Monacan Tribe of Indians.

Pierre's wife, Susanne, died after February 1701 and before November 1701, two of the children also had died. Pierre then married Anne Soblet. Ann was the daughter of Abraham Soblet and Susanne Brian. The marriage to Anne Soblet produced eight children. Anne Soblet Chastain died on April 3, 1723. Pierre married a third time to Mary Magdaline (Verrueil) Trabue, daughter of Moise and Magdelene Verrueil and widow of Antoine Trabue. Pierre Chastain died in Goochland County, Virginia in the fall of 1728. He had made his will on October 3, 1728 and this will was probated on November 20, 1728. He was buried in the family cemetery near his home. Magdeline Chastain died in late Spring of 1731, she and Pierre did not have children.

The family cemetery where Pierre Chastain was buried is located near Manakin Episcopal church. The Cemetery was located a few yards from the family home and contained several field stones and as many as 30 graves. A brick wall surrounding the family plot was torn down in 1929 by a farmer who used the bricks to build a house. In 1982, Lowell Chastain, then President of the Association, erected a grave marker for Pierre Chastain and constructed a chain-link fence around his grave.

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http://www.pierrechastain.com/content/sword.html

The sword of Pierre Chastain was passed down to Pierre's oldest son Jean Adam Chastain.

Jean Adam, in turn, gave the sword to his son, John Chastain, Jr. The sword made the move with John, Jr. and his family from Cumberland County to Bedford County, Virginia in about 1777.

John Jr.'s daughter, Edith, married Zachariah Wheat, a large land owner of Bedford County in the Blue Ridge Mountians. Edith died prior to Zachariah but he willed the sword to their son, Hazeal Wheat, who also inherited the farm.

Hazeal's son, Ortho W. Wheat, next owned the sword and he passed it on to his son, Hugh Wheat.

Hugh Wheat did not have children but prior to his death he gave the sword to his niece, Ann Arsell Wheat, now Mrs. Dallas W. Hunter, who is the present owner of Pierre's sword.

Mrs. Hunter had the sword examined by the Curator of Military Weapons at The Smithsonian Institute. The arms expert certified that the weapon had been made prior to 1700, that the handle was original but the original blade had been replaced with one a little wider.

Mrs. Hunter told her children that she would pass the sword to the first of her grandchildren who was given the name Chastain. Thus, Mrs. Hunter's grandson, Andrew Chastain Hunter, will inherit this most prized family possession, the personal sword of his great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, Pierre Chastain!

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http://www.pickensprogressonline.com/2015/news/recent-stories-index/3622-chastain-bloodline-could-hold-key-to-alzheimer-s-research

"We're the only family known with this gene," says Chastain descendant.

"If we step up we can help everybody."

alzheimers-family-tree

Descendants of Pierre Chastain who in Pickens and Gilmer counties unroll their extensive family tree. Top researcher Dr. Allan Levey at Emory's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center believes studying the Chastain family's genetics could lead to breakthroughs in the field.

It was July 12, 1700 when the ship Mary and Ann of London arrived at the mouth of Virginia's James River. On board were Pierre Chastain and other French Huguenot refugees who left Gravesend, England for the New World.
Chastain, one of the ship's 207 passengers, organized the transcontinental journey – but along with those refugees on the hunt for a new life in a new land, Chastain brought along a genetic makeup that could lead to breakthroughs in Alzheimer's research.
"The Chastain family bloodline defies anything," said Dr. Allan Levey, director of Emory's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. "In terms of what we would consider a strong genetic trait, this family way beats the odds. I don't know another family with such a high prevalence."
For over a decade Dr. Levey and his research team at Emory have studied descendants of Pierre Chastain because of the astonishingly high rate which they develop the disease. Alzheimer's affects 50 percent or more of the family, which, after 10 generations, has branched into north Georgia, including Pickens, Alabama and the Carolinas.
Dr. Levey discovered the family during a routine visit from one of the Chastain descendants.
"She had early stages of Alzheimer's and was looking for an evaluation," Dr. Levey said. "One of the regular things we do is ask for information about the family and family history. I discovered that her father had Alzheimer's and he has something like 12 or 13 siblings and they all had Alzheimer's."
Since that day, researchers at Emory have recruited 143 members of the family for the study in hopes of isolating a gene that contributes to the Chastains' affliction.
The family study is especially important, Dr. Levey said, because the Chastains develop the more common late-onset Alzheimer's - just like 90 percent of all people who develop the disease.
"There are some very, very rare families that have been studied who have members who get Alzheimer's at a young age," Dr. Levey said, "and these families have led to the discovery of three genes that cause Alzheimer's. This was a huge breakthrough. The Chastain family has the strong genetic basis as well, but also has the more typical late-onset and this means they could be even more important in terms of research.
"The discovery of the gene in their family will let us have an understanding of Alzheimer's and how it occurs in others," he added. "In those rare families with young onset we inferred from [their genes]. It is important to learn the process of what's going awry in the brain. Finding this gene could lead to future breakthroughs."
Pickens resident Dorothy Hightower is a member of the family who has donated her blood for research - and while the deadly disease plagues her family she thinks it could be a blessing that they are in a position to help others.
"This isn't just about my people," said Hightower, whose father died from Alzheimer's, and who has an aunt with dementia and another with the disease assoiated with memory loss. "It's about everybody's people. What if they can find a cure? We're the only family known with this gene. If we step up we can help everybody."
Hightower is calling out to Chastain descendants to step up and donate their own blood for research.
"The Chastain family is really, really big," she said as she and her daughter Victoria Rutledge unrolled a massive scroll of paper displaying the Chastain family tree. "I'd say in Pickens there must be at least 100. If you're a Chastain they want to study you."
Dr. Levey said anyone with the Chastain name is believed to be of the Pierre Chastain bloodline. All members of the Chastain family are desired for the study, but those over the age of 70 who have not developed Alzheimer's symptoms are particularly important.
"We need to compare those family members with and without the gene," he said. "Those older members without memory problems are the ideal candidates, but we definitely encourage everyone to participate."
Dorothy's daughter Virginia is a phlebotomist who owns and operates a medical screening company in Ellijay, and members of the Chastain family who are interested in participating in the research can give blood at her office rather than making the drive to Atlanta. She even offers a full blood chemistry panel as incentive for family members to come in.
"For me, our affliction isn't a bad thing," she said. "If we act now while the team has funding to do the research we can help find a cure. It's our responsibility to help and it keeps me hopeful for my kids and other kids. This is an opportunity."
As part of their ongoing research Dr. Levey and his team have developed a strong connection with the Chastains. They attend family reunions where they draw blood. Just last month, researchers traveled to Ellijay and made a presentation to members of the family about Alzheimer's and their family's significance in the field.
"Since the beginning I have met many times with many members of the family and have met with different branches," Dr. Levey said. "We've had branches come to Emory and members of families meet who didn't know one another. They are terrific people and I'd like to think I'm a part of their family. They see it very clearly; it's happening in their family and they are motivated to help us discover what caused the disease. The more people we have involved the more likely it's going to be for us to make those breakthroughs."
For more information about the Chastain Family Research Project contact CeeCee Manzanares at 404-727-9324.
Affinity Med Screens is located at 572 Maddox Drive, Ste 202B, Ellijay, Ga. 30540. Contact owner Virginia Rutledge at 706-480-4569.

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http://www.pierrechastain.com/content/sword.html

The sword of Pierre Chastain was passed down to Pierre's oldest son Jean Adam Chastain.

Jean Adam, in turn, gave the sword to his son, John Chastain, Jr. The sword made the move with John, Jr. and his family from Cumberland County to Bedford County, Virginia in about 1777.

John Jr.'s daughter, Edith, married Zachariah Wheat, a large land owner of Bedford County in the Blue Ridge Mountians. Edith died prior to Zachariah but he willed the sword to their son, Hazeal Wheat, who also inherited the farm.

Hazeal's son, Ortho W. Wheat, next owned the sword and he passed it on to his son, Hugh Wheat.

Hugh Wheat did not have children but prior to his death he gave the sword to his niece, Ann Arsell Wheat, now Mrs. Dallas W. Hunter, who is the present owner of Pierre's sword.

Mrs. Hunter had the sword examined by the Curator of Military Weapons at The Smithsonian Institute. The arms expert certified that the weapon had been made prior to 1700, that the handle was original but the original blade had been replaced with one a little wider.

Mrs. Hunter told her children that she would pass the sword to the first of her grandchildren who was given the name Chastain. Thus, Mrs. Hunter's grandson, Andrew Chastain Hunter, will inherit this most prized family possession, the personal sword of his great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, Pierre Chastain!

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http://huguenot-manakin.org/manakin/shiplists.php

Manakintown Huguenot Ship Lists
In 1700 and 1701, five ships brought Huguenot refugees from London to Virginia. No ship lists have been found for two of the ships, The Galley of London (came 1700) and The William and Elizabeth (came 1701), neither of which sent passengers directly to Manakintown.
Ship List: The Mary and Ann
This ship arrived at Jamestown on July 31, 1700, and many of the passengers proceeded by small boats to land recently vacated by the Monacan Indians which they named Manakin Town. The captain was Captain George Haves. It arrived at Hampton on 23 July 1700 with 118 men, 59 wives and girls and 38 children after a 13 week voyage.

•Pierre Delome, wife
•Marguerite Sene, daughter
•Magdalaine Mertle
•Jean Vidau
•Teertulien Sehult, wife, two children
•Pierre Lauret
•Jean Roger
•Pierre Chastain, wife, five children
•Philippe Duvivier
•Pierre Nace, wife, two daughters
•Francois Clere
•Symon Sardin
•Soubragon, and Jacques Nicolay
•Pierre du Loy
•Abraham Nicod
•Pierre Mallet
•Francoise Coupet
•Jean Oger, wife, three children
•Jean Saye
•Elizabet Angeliere
•Jean and Claude Mallfant, with their mother
•Isaac Chabanas, son and Catharine Bomard
•Estienne Chastain
•Adam Vignes
•Jean Menager et Jean Lesnard
•Estienne Badouet
•Pierre Morriset
•Jedron Chamboux, wife
•Jean Farry and Jerome Dumas
•Joseph Bourgoian
•David Bernard
•Jean Chevas, wife
•Jean Tardieu
•Jean Moreau
•Jaques Roy, wife
•Abraham Soblet, 2 children
•Quintin Chastatain and Michael Roux
•Jean Quictet, wife and 3 children
•Henry Cabanis, wife and 1 child
•Jaques Sayte
•Jean Boisson
•Francois Bosse
•Jean Fouchie
•Francoise Sassin
•Andre Cochet
•Jean Gaury, wife and 1 child
•Pierre Gaury, wife and 1 child
•Jaques Hulyre, wife and 4 children
•Pierre Perrut, wife
•Isaac Panetier
•Jean Parransos, sister
•Elie Tremson, wife
•Elizabeth Tignac
•Antoine Trouillard
•Jean Bourru and Jean Bouchet
•Jaques Voyes
•Elizabet Migot
•Catharine Godwal
•Pierre la Courru
•Jean and Michell Cautepie, wife, 2 children
•Jaques Broret, wife, 2 children
•Abraham Moulin, wife
•Francois Billot
•Pierre Comte
•Etienne Guevin
•Rene Massoneau
•Francois Du Tartre
•Isaac Verry
•Jean Parmentier
•David Thonitier, wife
•Moyse Levreau
•Pierre Tillou
•Marie Levseque
•Jean Constantin
•Claud Berdon, wife
•Jean Imbert, wife
•Elizabeth Fleury
•Looys du Pyn
•Jaques Richard, wife
•Adam and Marie Prevost
•Jaques Viras, wife
•Jaques Brousee, child
•Pierre Cornu
•Louis Bon
•Isaac Fordet
•Jean Pepre
•Jean Gaillard, son
•Anthonie Matton, wife
•Jean Lucadou, wife
•Louis Orange, wife and child
•Daniel Taure, two children
•Pierre Cupper
•Daniel Roy
•Magdelain Gigou
•Pierre Grelet
•Jean Jovany, wife, 2 children
•Pierre Ferrier, wife and child
•The Widow Faure and 4 children
•Isaac Arnaud, wife
•Pierre Chantanier, wife and father
•Jaen Fonasse
•Jaques Bibbeau
•Jean March
•Catharine Billot
•Marie and Symon Jourdon
•Abraham Menot
•Timothy Moul, wife and child
•Jean Savin, wife and child
•Jean Sargeaton, wife and child
•Claude Philipe, wife
•Gabriel Sturter
•Pierre de Corne
•Helen Trubyer
•39 wives or daughter, 38 children, 108 men=205 persons
•[Also on board were the leaders, Olivier de la Muce and Charles de Sailly]

Ship List: The Peter and Anthony
The second ship arrived in Jamestown in October 6 1700 under Capt. Daniel Perreau (Perault) and the passengers walked to Manakin Town.

•Monsieur de Joux, minister
•David Menestrier [Minitree]
•Jean Bossard, wife, 3 children
•Jacob Fleurnoir, wife, 2 sons, 2 daughters [Flournoy]
•Jean Morroe [Marot]
•David Blevet, wife, 6 children [Blouet]
•Pierre Masset
•Elizabeth Lemat
•Solomon Jourdan
•Abraham Le Foix, wife, 4 children
•Estienne Chabran, wife
•Jean Aunant, wife, daughter
•Susanne Soblet, 3 children
•Jean Genge de Melvis
•Jean Hugon
•Francois de Launay, 1 child
•Michel Michel
•Gaspart, wife, 7 children
•Theodore de Rousseau
•Samuel Mountier, wife, 2 children
•Pierre Cavalier, wife, son
•Jacques Corbell
•Pierre Anthonie Eupins
•Jacob Capen
•Isaac Le Feure
•Isaac Troc
•Jean Martain [Martin]
•Elié Gastand
•Jean Combelle
•Anthonie Boignard
•Pierre Renaud
•Nicholas Mare, wife, 2 children
•Marthien Roussel
•Jacques Feuillet, wife
•Augustin Coullard
•Pierre Sarazin
•Jean Coullard
•Jean Perrachou
•Jacques du Crow, wife, daughter
•Phillippe Claude [de Richebourg]
•Paul Laurion
•Simon Hugault
•Moise Broc
•Samuel Barrel
•Jean Pierre Bondurand
•Gaspar Gueruer, wife, 3 children
•Pierre La Badie
•Jean Soulegre
•Guilleaume Rullet
•Louis Desfontaine, wife
•Anthony Gioudar
•Daniel Rogier
•Anne Carbonnet, child
•Pierre Gosfand
•Guillemme Guervot, wife, son
•Solomon Ormund
•Louis Robert, daughter
•Louis Geoffray,
•Estienne Tauvin, wife and 2 children
•Maize Verneuil, wife, 5 children
•Paul Castiche
•Joseph Olivie,
•Jean Mazeris
•Jacques Faucher
•Noel Delamarre, wife, daughter
•Pierre La Grand, wife, 5 children
•Jean Le Vilain,
•Pierre Prevol,
•Jean Marisset,
•Daniel Riches,
•Jean Maillard, 3 children
•Francis Clapie
•Timotthee Roux
•Jacob Riché, wife and child
•Gaspart Guamondet, wife
•Mathieu Passedoit
•Jean Pilard
•Pierre Hiuert
•Estienne Ocosand
•Michel Fournet, wife, 2 children
•Abraham Remis, wife [Remy]
•Jean Monnicat
•Jean Le Franc Vudurand
•Simon Faucher
•Daniel Maison Dieu
•Pierre Baudry
•[TOTAL: 169]

Ship List: The Nassau
The Nassau, received a permit to depart Kensington, England, for Virginia, January 18, 1701 Capt. Tregian. It arrived March 5, 1701 and went up the York River. Only 23 went on to Manakintown.
List of French, Swiss, Genevese, German, and Flemish Protestants embarked on the ship named the Nassau to go to Virginia.

•Latane, Mr, Minister, wife, 1 child, 1 maidservant
•Braban, Daniel, wife, 3 children, 1 servant (boy)
•Gargean, Jean Pierre, wife, 3 children
•Amonet, Jacob, wife, 4 children
•Papin, Paul
•Leroy, Jean
•Lacaze, Jacques
•Dubrog, Jean
•Basel, Catharine, 1 daughter
•Lefebre, Ester
•Martin, Ester, 1 child
•Ribot, Francois
•Molinie, Joseph, wife
•Chareitié, Leon Auguste, wife
•Barachin, Jean, wife
•Caillau, Joseph, femme
•Dauphin, Jean
•Bellin, Jeane
•Gautie, Margueritte
•Mallet, Marie
•Denielle, Thomas
•Macan, Jacques, wife
•Thomas, Jean, wife
•Robert, Jean, wife, 1 daughter
•Madouy, Alexandre
•Richemon, Noel, wife
•Fonnielle, Jean, wife
•Bocar, Estienne, wife, 2 children
•Fradot, Jacques
•Maupin, Gabriel, wife, 3 children
•Sponge, Jacob, wife
•Duncan, Ester
•Hernon, Jaques
•Chaperon, Jean
•Felsau, Francois
•Prain, Jean
•Taniere, Salomon, wife
•Odias, Pierre
•Faouton, Jean
•Fereé, Pierre, wife, 1 child
•Gonfan, Francois, wife, daughter
•Lataniere, Lazare, wife
•Belloe, Jean
•Delinet, Jacques
•Bricou, Salomon, wife
•Barbie, Claude, wife
•Dehon, Estinne
•Corneau, Henry
•Ferran, Daniel
•Gomar, Jean, wife, 5 children
•Rousset, Jean
•Montgut, Pierre
•Vaillan, Alexander
•Gondemay, Solomon, wife
•Girardeau, Louis
•Dousseau, Daniel
•Cahaigne, Michel
•Duval, Daniel
•Prampain, Corneille
•Coustillat, Paul
•des Maizeaux, Pierre
•Lorange, Jean Velas, wife, 1 child
•Egarnae, Jean
•Gueraux, Pierre
•Lalorie, Anthoine
•Bonsergent, Matthieu, wife
•Leroy, Paul, wife
•Lanusse, Bernard, wife
•Charpentier, Francois, wife
•Surin, Jean
•Lemarchand, Jacques
•Bonviller, Issac
•de Vallons, Melkier
•de'Hay, Issac
•Cury, Abraham
•Berrard, Joseph, wife
•Parmantie, Charles
•Langlade, Emanuel
•Olmier, Jean
•Charier, Charles
•Prevoteau, Sebastian
•Delpus, Francis
•Collie, Henry, wife, 1 child
•Cheneau, Estienne, wife
•duch*emin, Daniel, wife
•Gueran, Daniel, wife, 4 children
•Soulié, Jean, wife, 3 children
•Ducré, Nicholas, wife
•Levasseur, Jean Noel, wife
•Losane, Louis, wife, 2 children
•Curien, Elizabet
•Surgan, Jean Boyé
•Lecoin, Marie Catherine
•Fauquaran, Jean, wife
•Morel, Elizabet
•Balaros, Pierre
•Legover, Paul Swiss
•Faizant, Jean Jacques
•Aigle, Jacob
•Shriflit, Pierre
•Cumery, Ouly
•Herbert, Madame, 4 daughters (from Geneva)
•Pasteur, Jean
•Dupuy, ----
•Pasteur, Charles, wife
•Hayer, Elizabet (German)
•Hehns, Marie (Flemish)
•Total= 191

More About Dr. Pierre Jacques Chastain:
Baptism: 09 Apr 1659, Charost, Province of Berri (present-day Department of Cher), France
Burial: Plot on Monocan Farm near Manakin Episcopal Church, Powhatan Co., VA
Elected/Appointed 1: Abt. 1701, According to the journal of a Swiss visitor to Manakin, Francis Louis Mitchell, the Manakin settlement was headed by a surgeon named Chaltin, meaning Pierre Chastain. William Byrd had apparently proposed Chastain govern the Huguenot colony, but did not.
Elected/Appointed 2: Abt. 1701, Pierre Chastain and 12 other men served the first vestry of King William Parish. He was elected again in 1718, and later he served as both church warden and vestryman.
Emigration: 10 Apr 1700, Pierre Chastain, his wife Susanne Renaud, and their five children embarked from Gravesend, England with 207 French and Swiss passengers.
Event 1: Bef. 1692, Following the persecutions of the Huguenots in Charost, France, he fled across the Jura Mountains to Yverdon, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland, and then to Vevey, Vaud, Switzerland. His wife and children had joined him there by 1696.
Event 2: Abt. 1700, Col. William Byrd, an influential landowner who operated a store below present-day Richmond, VA, selected the Manakin Indian fields as the Huguenot settlement, intended as a buffer between the English to the east and the Indians to the west.
Event 3: 1978, The Pierre Chastain Family Association restored the graves of Pierre Chastain and his family.
Immigration: 23 Jul 1700, After a passage of 13 weeks, his ship, the "Mary and Ann" of London, arrived at the mouth of the James River, and he subsequently settled at the Manakin French Huguenot settlement in present-day Powhatan County, Virginia.
Occupation: Chirurgien (physician/surgeon) and perruquier (barber/wig maker)
Probate: 20 Nov 1728, Goochland Co., VA
Property 1: 23 Mar 1715, Patented 111 acres of the 5000 acre tract reserved for the French refugees.
Property 2: Bet. 1723 - 1728, Obtained a 574-acre tract from Rene LaForce; owned 1063 acres in the parish by 1728.
Property 3: 09 Jul 1724, Patented 379 acres in Henrico Co., VA on the west side of Jones Creek, adjoining Peter Faure, for importing Mary, Jane, and Peter Chastain, Jr. , and Walter Povalle.
Will: 03 Oct 1728, Goochland Co., VA (now part of Powhatan County)--disposed of 1154 acres to eight surviving children, most of them by his second wife Anne Soblet.

Children of Pierre Chastain and Suzanne Reynaud are:
50 i. Dr. Jean Adam Chastain, born May 1690 in Vevey, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland; died Abt. Nov 1761 in present-day Powhatan County, Virginia USA (then part of Cumberland County); married (1) Mary Ann David? Bef. 1713 in Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement, present-day Powhatan Co., VA; married (2) Charlotte Judith Amonet Abt. 1726.
ii. Marie Susanne Chastain, born Oct 1691 in Berne, Switzerland; died Bef. 1701 in Virginia.
iii. Pauline Elizabeth Chastain, born Apr 1693 in Vevey, Switzerland; died Abt. 1698.
iv. Pierre Chastain, born Aug 1694 in Vevey, Switzerland; died Abt. 1698.
v. Arthuze Chastain, born Mar 1696 in Vevey, Switzerland; died Abt. 1698.
vi. Jeanne Francoise Chastain, born Feb 1697 in Vevey, Switzerland; died Bef. 1701 in Virginia.
vii. Pierre Samuel Chastain, born May 1698 in Vevey, Switzerland; died Bef. 1701 in Virginia.
viii. Susanne Chastain (possible daughter), born Sep 1699 in Wallone, Leiden, Holland.

102. Nicholas David? He married 103. Nicole le Coque?.
103. Nicole le Coque?

Child of Nicholas David? and Nicole le Coque? is:
51 i. Mary Ann David?, born 16 Mar 1701 in Mareuil-le-port, France?; died 21 Aug 1724 in present-day Powhatan County, Virginia USA (then part of Cumberland County); married Dr. Jean Adam Chastain Bef. 1713 in Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement, present-day Powhatan Co., VA.

112. Mareen Duvall the Elder, born Abt. 1661 in South River Hundred, Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Abt. 1734 in Anne Arundel Co., MD. He was the son of 224. Mareen Duvall and 225. ?. He married 113. Frances Stockett Abt. 1685 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.
113. Frances Stockett, born in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died in Anne Arundel Co., MD. She was the daughter of 226. Capt. Thomas Stockett III and 227. Mary Wells.

Notes for Mareen Duvall the Elder:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

MAREEN DUVALL THE ELDER2
1661 - 173...
AND
HIS DESCENDANTS

Mareen Duvall the Elder, second son of the Emigrant, was born in or about 1661 in South River Hundred, Anne Arundel County. As a youth of about 17 years, he served during 1678 in a minor capacity under Colonel William Burgess who commanded the punitive expedi­tion to the Eastern Shore against the Nantico*ke Indians, and for his services he was voted 80 lbs of tob. at the November session of the General Assembly in 1678.1
This service is incorrectly attributed to his father, but realistically it should go to Mareen the Elder, for at that time Mareen the Emigrant was fully 47 years old, an age not usually associated with active combat unless a seasoned warrior in a commissioned capacity. And 80 lbs of tob. were not adequate compensation for an officer. Colonel William Burgess, the General or Commander-in-Chief, was voted 6,000 lbs of tob.
Before 1688 he married into one of the most fashionable and aris­tocratic families living on the Ridge in Anne Arundel County, and it was undoubtedly an union second to none of his brothers and sisters. He took as his bride Frances Stockett, daughter of Captain Thomas Stockett, Esq., a staunch supporter of the Stuarts who with his three brothers from County Kent after the execution of Charles I in 1649 in order to escape the rule of Cromwell and his ruffians followed Charles II to France and were members of his court at St. Germain during his nine years of exile.*
Mary, the wife of Captain Thomas Stockett, was the daughter of Richard Wells, one of the ruling deputies of Maryland during the Commonwealth, whose wife Frances Whyte paradoxically was a daughter of staunch Catholic Royalists and the granddaughter of Richard, Earl of Portland, KG, the treasurer to Charles I. There was consequently a Montague falling in love and marrying a Capulet or a Royalist and High Churchman marrying a daughter of a Puritan and non-comformist.*
After the death of his father-in-law, Thomas Stockett, in 1671, Mareen Duvall's mother-in-law or the widow of Captain Stockett, married secondly George Yate, Esq., who succeeded Stockett as Deputy Surveyor for Anne Arundel County. Madame Mary Yate died testate and quoting from her last will and testament, proved March 29, 1699, "To my daughter Frances wife of Marein Duvall I bequeath my silver seal in a lozenge shield." This seal was definitely the armorial bearing of her house, as the Stockett arms engraved on a black walnut box was willed to her son Thomas Stockett 2d.2
The exact number of children born to this union are not known, as only one was registered in All Hallow's Parish, but by a statement made in 1720, he referred to his "wife and children''. At that time his children had certainly reached maturity, but inasmuch as he sus­tained financial losses, his children at home were presumably daughters without dowries who failed to secure husbands among the buxoms of the neighborhood.

Issue of Mareen and Frances (Stockett) Duvall*

1. Mareen Duvall, born 1687, married Sarah ---. q.v.

According to the will of his father in 1694, he was living on "Middle Plantation," but as a tenant only, for the will devised Lewis (son of Mareen the Emigrant) "all that my 300 acres of land and plantation whereon my Eldest son Mareen Duvall now dwelleth it being a moytie Lying on the south east portion or End of 600 acres of land Called Middle Plantation."
In addition to the reversion in certain lands upon a contingency, his only bequest from his father's will was 5 shillings - virtually a dis­inheritance. "I give and bequeath to my son Mareen Duvall the Eldest of that name five Shillings Sterling Money of England to be paid unto him by my Executrix hereafter named after my decease."
There is evidence that he voiced the most violent opposition to his father's marriage to a young and calculating woman and for his hos­tility he was not only cut off but as the second son was overlooked in the administration of the parental estate. At the time of his father's death he was seated on a portion of "Middle Plantation" which he had to relinquish to his brother, Lewis, who was willed it in fee simple. Fortunately, he married an heiress who inherited a portion of "Vale of Benjamin" near the Patuxent River in Prince Georges County.
After the death of his father when his brother Lewis gained possession of the southern portion of "Middle Plantation," whereon Mareen and his young family were living, he settled on a portion of "Vale of Benjamin," a Stockett tract, lying on the Western Branch of the Patuxent in what was then known as Western Branch Hundred of Prince Georges County. It was about this time that through fi­nancial losses his English creditors, Micajah Perry & Co., of London, Merchant, obtained judgment for £500.* In order to protect the inheritance of his son and heir, he and Frances his wife of Prince Georges County on August 13, 1701, conveyed to John Barrett, Gent., for natural love and affections for their son, Mareen, and for diver other causes and consideration "tract of land or plantation being part of 1,000 acres of a tract known as Vale of Benjamin whereon the said Mareen now lives . . . including dwelling house, etc. . . . ." Mareen Duvall and his wife Frances both signed the deed in the presence of Robert Tyler and Thomas Sprigg, two Justices of Peace for Prince Georges County.*
On January 15, 1708/9, he patented two tracts of land in Prince Georges County, one "Duvall's Range" of 200 acres and the other "Duvall's Hunting Quarter" of 100 acres.4
On October 10, 1709, George Yate and John Yate, brothers, of Baltimore County, Planters, for divers good considerations and causes appointed "my Trusty and well beloved
*Brother Marreen Duval of Prince Georges County my lawful attorney" to convey "Vale of Benjamin" lying in Prince Georges County to John Bell and his heirs. Both grantors signed the deed before Richard Owing and John Gard­ner, witnesses, while it was countersigned by William Talbot and Edward Stevenson, two Justices of the Peace for Baltimore County. Accordingly, on March 4, 1709/10, he sold 32 acres of "Vale of Benjamin," lying on Turkey Branch, to John Bell, of Prince Georges County, Taylor, under the name of "Bell's Purchase."5
On August 5, 1710, Marren Duvall Sr., of Prince Georges County, deeded to Martha West, daughter of Peter West, late of the said county, deceased, for 3000 pounds of tobacco West Choice," being a portion of "Duvall's Range." He signed the deed which was wit­nessed by John Wall and John Middleton. His wife, Frances, waived all dower rights before James Stoddart and J. Gerrard, two Justices of the Peace.5a
He contributed yearly to the reduction of the debt contracted with Micajah Perry & Co., but in 1720 being unable to meet the interest or principal he was placed in the gaol of Prince Georges County. Ac­cordingly, on October 20, 1720, a bill was introduced in the Lower House for the "Reliefe of Mareen Duvall a languishing Prisoner in Prince Georges County."6
The following appears in the minutes of the Assembly on October 14, 1720:7

"The Petition of Marine Duvall Senr praying to be relieved from a Judgement Obtained by Micajah Perry and Company against him was Read and Ordered that the person or persons concerned for the said Perry appear before this House at two of the Clock in the afternoon to make their Objections if any thereto."

Messrs. Micajah Perry & Co., of London Merchant, had obtained judgement against "Mr. Duvall in Anne Arundel County" about 1703 for £500, but Mr. Duvall was able to pay yearly towards the dis­charge of the debt until 1718 when judgement was renewed in the Provincial Court. Charles Carroll, attorney for Perry, "forbade any further Prosecution against Mareen Duvall," but at Carroll's death an execution was served for the original sum. Duvall, according to the testimony, was not in a position to pay, and stated in his petition that he was "very willing to part with all that he hath in the world to­wards the payment if Messrs Perry & Co. would grant him liberty."
It was furthermore stated that Mareen Duvall had "not fallen under such Circ*mstances by an Idleness, having been always a pain Taking Industrious planter, but by losses & Mismanagement of his affairs . . . and therefore for that the said Mareen and his Family are thought fitt objects of charity . . . and that Mareen Duvall would dispose of his dwelling-plantation and all his real and personal estate and that the money arising from the sale would be placed in the hands of Thomas Bordley of Annapolis for use of Perry & Co., except necessary wearing apparel for him Self wife & Children Excepted." The Rev. Jacob Henderson, however, was to enjoy a moyety of "Howerton's Range," according to the bond between him and Mareen Duvall.8
On October 27, 1723, the Assembly passed an act for his relief, and in accordance on November 1, 1723, he conveyed to Rev. Jacob Henderson for a consideration of £80 a portion of "Howerton's Range." No wife waived dower. He signed as Mareen Duvall Sr. before Joseph Belt and Ralph Crabb, two Justices of the Peace for Prince Georges County.9

Inasmuch as at a session of the Assembly held at Annapolis on Octo­ber 27, 1723, an act was passed for the relief of Mareen Duvall, the said Mareen Duvall, of Prince Georges County, Planter, deeded to Mareen Duvall Jr. certain entailed land. An excerpt from the deed of conveyance read as follows:10

"Mareen Duvall father of Mareen Duvall and grandfather of Mareen Duvall Jr. by his last will and testament did reserve reversion to several tracts of land be­queathed in tail to several other of his children to the said Mareen the grandfather his heirs at law which said Reversions was publicly in the present of two Justices . . . now Mareen Duvall to Mareen Duvall Jr. all his rights reversion in Middleton Plantation, Duvall's Range, Wilson Plaines, Morley's Lott, Morley's Grove and a tract original surveyed for John Larkin."

Mareen Duvall Sr. signed the deed before Joseph Belt and Ralph Crabb, Justices.
On October 4, 1726, he, of Prince Georges County, aged 65, swore that his father had two tracts of land, one called "Wilson's Plaines" and the other "Howerton's Range" and that his father "being disatisfied how his land lay sent for George Yate and Henry Hanslap . . . his brother John Duvall now deceased saw Robert Proctor, de­ceased, deliver the land by Turfe & Twigg to his deceased father as the land was called Wilson's Plaines."11
At a controversy in 1727 over the boundary of "Vale of Benjamin" which had belonged to his mother-in-law, "Murren Duvall Sr. aged 66 . . . [stated] that Samuel Magruder, of Prince Georges County, pur­chased Vale of Benjamin of Mary Yate, of Anne Arundel County, deceased, and in running out his land was fearful of other surveys so stopped his course at a certain white oak on the Vale of Benjamin."*12
On February 6, 1732/3, Marine Duvall Sr., aged 72, deposed that his father claimed a certain bound tree as one of the land marks on "Middleton Plantation." The deposition arose over the division of the estate between Mistress Martha Duvall and her sister Madame Ann Wey of South Carolina, the daughters and coheiresses of Lewis Du­vall.13
He apparently died before August 22, 1735, for on that day his son and heir, Mareen Duvall, was accorded the title of "Senior." No will has been found and no formal administration was made to the Prerogative Court, so consequently the estate was settled privately among the heirs.

HISTORY OF MIDDLE PLANTATION

No land grant in Maryland holds more interest or sentiment to the descendants of Mareen Duvall than Middle Plantation, though it re­mained the actual seat of the Duvall family for only a little more than 50 years. Yet descendants of Mareen the Emigrant held it except for a few intervening years until 1833.
Why Mareen Duvall named his seat Middle Plantation is a matter of some conjecture - perhaps because it lay between South and Patuxent Rivers, two navigable streams, when majority of the land grants in that day were being laid out on water fronts. Middle Plantation is usually described as being near the head of South River, but in study­ing many early surveys in that area "at the head of South River" was used very loosely in the description of land grants. South River is actually an inlet of the Chesapeake and not a river in the technical sense. Its head waters are mostly marshy lowlands, sluggish ponds or whatnot. In Louisiana they would be known as a bayou.
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* These depositions show conclusively that the widow of the Rev. Mr. Hender­son was not the last wife and surviving widow of Mareen Duvall. Mary Stanton who has been cited as a wife of Mareen was therefore not the latter's widow, as the widow of Mareen and first wife of Henderson died in 1736.

Middle Plantation, however, touched or nearly touched one of the forks of Flat Creek which runs northward until it joins South River. A corner of Middle Plantation did border Cattaile Branch which flows south westernly into the Patuxent. So Mareen the Emigrant evidently erected his dwelling on that elevation of land as it sloped north­ward to South River and southward to the Patuxent. The portal to his hospitable dwelling looked north, as he spoke of his south chamber.
Lewis, the third son, acquired 300 acres out-right by the terms of his father's will, it including the southeastern farm on which Mareen the Elder had lived as a tenant of his father. Shortly after his father's death, Lewis sold 53 acres of his inheritance to James Frisell. On August 31, 1701, Frisell by his will devised the 53 acres which had been under cultivation to his widow, Ann, who soon married Timothy Shaw upon whose death it became escheat to His Lordship. Ulti­mately, Robert Morris had it resurveyed and patented by special war­rant from the Land Office under the name of Middle Plantation. On January 9, 1727/8, Morris assigned the 53 acres to Humphrey Godman, and the latter on April 7, following, conveyed them to Richard Snowden.
The loss of deeds for that period precludes any description of the conveyance, but it is believed that 53 acres would be the size of a farm that a recently married son would be cultivating on his father's estate. After the settlement of his father's will and Mareen the Elder being virtually disinherited, not receiving a single square inch of the landed estate, he removed to the other side of the Patuxent on land belonging to his wife. So the 53-acre conveyance by Lewis did not contain, as it is believed, the parental dwelling.
The remaining portion of Middle Plantation containing the dwell­ing house was willed by Mareen the Emigrant to his widow during her natural life, with a reversion upon her death to his son Lewis. The widow, however, did not remain at Middle Plantation, but joined her next husband, Henry Ridgely, at his plantation in Prince Georges County. While there is positive evidence that John, Mareen the Elder, and Mareen the Younger were antagonistic to their step-mother, a bond of sympathy and affection evidently existed between Lewis and her.
In some manner not known Madame Duvall-Ridgely conveyed her life interest to her step-son Lewis, for by 1700 he was in possession of 547 acres, the entire plantation save the 53 acres already alienated. Being in possession of 547 acres and applying for some vacant, contiguous land, Lewis Duvall on October 9, 1700, received a special warrant from His Lordship's Land Office for a resurvey of Middleton Plantation, and on December 20, 1700, James Carroll, Deputy Surveyor of Anne Arundel County, accordingly laid out 844 acres as the "Resurvey of a tract of land called middle plantacon originally Surveyed for his Father Marine Duvall," beginning at a tree of Benjamin Williams.41
Middle Plantation remained the seat of Lewis Duvall and his family until November 20, 1708, when the entire plantation of 844 acres was assigned or placed under the trusteeship of John Hyde, Merchant and Broker of Annapolis. By December 1710 Lewis Duvall had left the Province and whether he returned before 1718, the definite year he settled on the Ashley River in South Carolina, it is not known. After the death of Lewis in the South, the three co-heiresses held the planta­tion, although Joseph Way Sr., husband of Ann, attempted to break the entail in 1734. After the death of Mistress Martha Duvall, who had been unsuccessful in docking the entail after her return to Mary­land, the entire plantation descended to Ann (Duvall) Way-Sachervell-Wynn, the youngest daughter, and it was held by her until her death in 1761. At that time her son and heir, Joseph Way Jr., with deposi­tions as to his ancestry and inheritance arrived in Maryland and was able after some litigation to make a valid deed of conveyance in 1763 to Nicholas Maccubin, Merchant of Annapolis.
In some manner perhaps for the payment of quit-rents, repairs, brokerage fees and the like Nicholas Maccubin had acquired some lien on the plantation, so after an amiable settlement Joseph Way Jr. conveyed his equity to Zachariah Hood, of Anne Arundel, Merchant.
On August 1, 1764, Zachariah Hood, Merchant, for £137 con­veyed 110 acres to Thomas Rutland Jr., Merchant, being that portion of Middle Plantation "beginning at a bounded locust post standing near a draft leading into Chilcotte Branch" it being the beginning of Nettle Land and Plumpton since called Plains, also a tree of Puddington and Covil's Folly, and extending to Selby orchards, with all mes­suages, etc. This was definitely a part of the upper portion and it contained improvements.42
On July 5, 1767, Zachariah Hood likewise conveyed to Nicholas Maccubin for £995 land on the south side of South River called Middle Plantation except that portion sold to Thomas Rutland which contained 110 acres and the remaining part "now containing 711 ½ acres," also Duvall Pasture of 24 acres on the south side of South River beginning at an oak on a point of Cattaile Branch, it being a boundary between Middle Plantation and Burgess Choice and extending to Morley's Lott.43
On August 15, 1767, Nicholas Maccubin sold 218 acres of his 711-acre portion to Henry O'Neal Welch for £327 or that portion of Middle Plantation on the south side of South River beginning at a persimmon tree it being bounded "in the room of the original bound­ary" and bordering Puddington and Duvall's Addition . . . to a point on Catttalie Branch it being a boundary of Burgess Choice . . . with all edifices and appurtenance. This alienation also contained improvements.
Nicholas Maccubin held the residue or 493 ½ acres of Middle Plantation until 1773. The question is. Did this portion contain the original dwelling house of Mareen the Emigrant? Nicholas Maccubin was a wealthy merchant of Annapolis and had married Mary Clare Carroll, daughter and eventually sole-heiress to the vast estates of her father Dr. Charles Carroll. It was her sons who took their mother's name of Carroll to perpetuate the tradition. Another question also rises. Did Nicholas Maccubin maintain Middle Plantation between 1767 and 1773 as a country seat and construct a pretentious 18th century dwelling? If the original house of Mareen the Emigrant were on this portion, it is not likely that Nicholas Maccubin with his great wealth would have been content to share the compactness and conventions of the 17th century dwelling when the wealthy county gentry of Maryland were erecting large country houses after the manorial estates of England.
On December 4, 1773, Nicholas Maccubin sold 493 ½ acres of Middle Plantation to Thomas Henry Hall and William Hall 3d, brothers and great-grandsons of Mareen the Emigrant. A moyety therefore returned to Duvall descendants. The purchase price was £1557 which would indicate that the tract contained a dwelling of some pretensions. This alienation was definitely the southern-most portion of Middle Plantation and it bordered Cat Tail Meadow.
Thomas Henry Hall removed to Washington County and con­veyed his interest to his brother, William Hall 3d, who eventually came into possession of the entire 493 acres which remained his dwell­ing-plantation until his death in 1815.
From the 1798 assessments for South River Hundred, we learn that William Hall 3d had one dwelling house and five out houses on his estate. Unfortunately, the ancient plantation names were not given in the list in order to recognize other portions of Middle Plantation and to learn the various proprietors. The assessment also failed to state whether the dwelling house was of brick or frame, but it measured 20 by 16 feet. There were two kitchens - one 8 by 16 feet and the other 12 by 16 feet. The other three out houses measured 12 by 12, 26 by 12, and 20 by 16.44
William Hall 3d devised the estate to his widow, Margaret, during life, then it was to be divided among his heirs. At her death in 1831 the heirs petitioned the High Court of Chancery for power to sell the estate in order that the proceeds might be divided equally among the representatives.
It was at this time or in September 1833 that John T. Hodges pur­chased 401 acres for $12,471.10 which, in the light of the present purchasing power of the current dollar, would be about $200,000. It was also at this time that Thomas S. Alexander, the trustee for the sale of the portion of Middle Plantation and Duvall's Pasture for the heirs of William Hall 3d, had the plantation resurveyed as shown in a nearby diagram.
If Nicholas Maccubin did not construct a pretentious 18th century dwelling, then William Hall 3d whose estate was by no means negli­gible erected the dwelling which is still standing with ancient box.
In the meantime Henry O'Neal Welch who bought 711 acres in 1767 died without issue in 1784 and willed his dwelling-plantation equally to his two nephews Thomas King and Nicholas Welch, with Thomas King receiving the portion which contained the dwelling-plantation. Nicholas Watkins of Thomas purchased King's portion and received a deed from him on September 9, 1800. The purchase price was £1884/4/7 and consisted of 374 acres of the whole, that is portions of the following tracts "Burgess Choice," "Covill's Folly," "Middle Plantation" and "Puddington." In July 1822 the heirs of Thomas King sued Watkins alleging that it was entailed property and that it was not capable of alienation. Disinterested parties made depositions to the effect that the improvements on the land had been made by Nicholas Watkins who built a dwelling house, tobacco house, and several out-houses.45
Benjamin Watkins presumably an heir of Nicholas Watkins of Thomas on September 29, 1840, mortgaged his dwelling-plantation of "Burgess Choice" and "Middle Plantation" consisting of 380 acres and negroes and other personalty over which a lawsuit ultimately devel­oped.46
Excavations on certain portions of Middle Plantation have produced in recent years some human relics, but were they the earthly remains from the old Duvall family burying grounds or those of the Hall private burying grounds? The destruction or decay of head stones alleviates any positive evidence for the present antiquarian. And the eternal question remains. Was the dwelling-house of Mareen the Emigrant on the portion alienated to Thomas Rutland or that sold to Henry O'Neal Welch or the portion that Nicholas Maccubin retained until 1773. If it were on the Maccubin portion then either Maccubin or William Hall 3d demolished the ancestral dwelling of the Duvall family.
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SOURCES: 1. Liber 4, folio 60, Land Office; 2. Archives, vol. 49, p. 303; 3. Ar­chives, vol. 17, p. 24; 4. Liber 4, folio 431, Land Office; 5. Rent Rolls, Liber 1, folios 37, 53; Liber 21, folio 67, Land Office; 6. Liber 7, folio 451, Land Office, 7. Liber 8, folios 145, 146, Land Office; 8. Liber 12, folio 304, Land Office; 9. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber IH no. 2, folio 1; 10. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber IT no. 5, folio 8; II. Archives, vol. 54, p. 390; 12. Archives, vol. 17, pp. 23-24; 12a. Provincial Crt Judgement, Liber WRC, folio 637; 13. Inventories, Liber 18, folio 89; 14. Archives, vol. 7, pp. 609, 611; 15. Archives, vol. 8, p. 343; 16. Wills, Liber 2, folio 327; 17. Test. Proc., Liber 150, folio 201; 18. Test. Proc., Liber 150, folio 128; 19. Test. Proc., Liber 150, folio 169; 20. Test. Proc., Liber 150, folio 198; 21. Test. Proc., Liber 150, folio 200; 22. Archives, v. 20, p. 362; 23. Test. Proc., Liber 16, folio 86; 24. Test. Proc., Liber 16, folio 126; 25. Test. Proc., Liber 16, folio 112; 26. In­ventories & Accounts, Liber 15, folio 64; Liber 18, folio 183; 27. Wills, Liber 13, folio 89; 28. Box 2, folio 37, Hall of Records; 29. Inventories & Accounts, Liber 323, folio 68; 30. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber E, folio 567; 31. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber E, folio 648; 32. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber E, folio 733; 33. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber M, folio 86; 34. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber Q, folio 637; 35. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber T, folios 67, 107; 36. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber T, folio 238; 37. Queen Annes Parish Vestry Proceedings; 38. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber Y, folio 24; 39. Pr. Geo. Co. Deeds, Liber BB, folio 323; 40. Pr. Geo. Deeds, Liber NH no. 10, folios 378, 379; 41. Liber DD no. 5, folio 510, Liber PL no. 2, folio 337, Land Office; 42. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber BB no. 3, folio 722; 43. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber BB no. 3, folio 741; 44. Md. Hist. Soc., Balto.; 45. Chancery Papers no. 1568, Land Office, Annapolis; 46. Chancery Liber 162, folio 439

Child of Mareen Elder and Frances Stockett is:
56 i. Mareen Duvall III, born 24 Oct 1687 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Aft. 1748 in Prince Georges Co., MD?; married Sarah Griffith Abt. 1710.

114. Samuel Griffith, born Abt. 1630 in Wales; died Abt. 1717 in Calvert County, Maryland USA. He married 115. Elizabeth ?.
115. Elizabeth ?, died Aft. 1717.

Children of Samuel Griffith and Elizabeth ? are:
i. Martha Griffith, died Abt. 1718; married ? Evans.
ii. Mary Griffith, married (unknown) Bowers.
iii. Rebecca Griffith, died Aft. 24 Aug 1761; married Edward Mobberly; born 13 May 1696 in Probably All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Abt. 1761 in Prince Georges Co., MD.
iv. Elizabeth Griffith, born Abt. 1675 in "Cool Spring Manor, " Calvert Co., MD; died 18 Jan 1751 in Prince Georges Co., MD; married (1) Guy White, Jr.; born 21 Nov 1676 in Calvert Co., MD; died Abt. 1712 in Queen Anne Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; married (2) Thomas Miles Aft. 1689.
58 v. Samuel Griffith, Jr., born Abt. 1681 in Calvert Co., MD; died 1741 in Calvert Co., MD; married (1) Sarah Evans Abt. 1693 in probably Anne Arundel Co., MD; married (2) Ann Skinner Abt. 1730.
57 vi. Sarah Griffith, born Abt. 1685 in Calvert Co., MD; died Aft. 1748 in Prince Georges Co., MD?; married Mareen Duvall III Abt. 1710.
vii. Rachel Griffith, born Abt. 1689; married John Giles 09 Dec 1710; died Abt. 1727 in Baltimore Co., MD.
viii. Zipporah Griffith, born 11 Feb 1691.

118. Clarke Skinner, born Bef. 1677; died Abt. 1714 in Calvert Co., MD. He was the son of 236. Robert Skinner and 237. Ann Storer. He married 119. Ann ?.
119. Ann ?, died Abt. Feb 1716 in Calvert Co., MD.

More About Clarke Skinner:
Comment: Apparently he was married twice, first to Ruth ? and then to Ann ?; it is not known which one was the mother of his only known child Ann.
Elected/Appointed: Was an office holder in Calvert County; signed the memorial sent to King William in 1695 after his lucky escape from an assassin.
Probate: 18 Feb 1714, Calvert Co., MD
Property 1: 1702, Purchased "Hatchett" in Prince George's Co., MD from his brother William.
Property 2: Abt. 1703, Clarke Skinner and his wife Ann owned an inn or ordinary at Charles Towne, Prince George's Co., MD
Will: Feb 1710, Calvert Co., MD Wills, Vol. 14, p. 21

Notes for Ann ?:
http://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I047199&tree=tree1

Mr. Clark Skinner 36B.184 I CA £59.7.3 {1715}
Appraisers: Edward Boteler, John Deekins.
Creditors: Benjamin Short.
===
Clark Skinner 38A.79 A £59.2.9 £58.12.5 Apr 10 1717
Payments to: estate of John Shorts, W. Bladen, Esq.
Administrator: Benjamin Short (administrator of Anne Skinner (executrix of deceased)).
===
Skinner, Robert, . Calvert Co., 5th Mch., 1685 ; 13th Dec. 1686.
To eldest son Robert and hrs., plantation and "Island Neck.'
To dau. Mary Letchworth and to her first born child, personalty,
To 2nd son Clarke and hrs., "The Border," "The Reserve" and "The Scraps."
To 3rd son William and hrs., "The Hatchet" on Patuxent R.
To youngest son Adderton and hrs, " The Reserve."
To 3 last named sons at majority personalty.
To wife Anne, personalty.
Son Robert appointed guardian of 3 young. sons. Should he die, 2 sons-in-law Thos. Greenfield and Joseph Letchworth to act in his stead.
Test : Robert Houldsworth, Arthur Storer, Elizabeth Cornall, William Moore. 4. 23
==
John Short 36B.45 A CA £233.17.0 £216.16.9 Sep 17 1714
Received from: Jonathon Mathew, Joseph Jackson.
Payments to: Thomas Ennis, George Keeple, Thomas Lynch, James Waldey, William Smith, Thomas Tasker, Esq., Richard Jones, Mr. Walter Smith, George Cole, Sir Thomas Lawrence, John Manning, Mr. Cheseldyne, (entry unreadable), Joseph West, William Sturnace, William Jones, Michael Askew, John Deaver, Thomas Larkin, Maj. Watson, Joshua Cecil, William Wilkinson, Richard Evans, Nicholas Spowrne, Mr. Walter Smith, William Stone, John Elsey, William Bladen, Esq., Archibald Edmondson, Henry Fernley, Thomas Brooke, Esq., Dr. James Kingsbury, John Gardner, Mr. Beale, John Melfitt, Joseph Hall, Samuel Watkins.
List of debts: William Restall (runaway), Richard Saynesbury, Charles Tracy
(dead). Executrix: Anne Skinner, wife of Clarke Skinner.
===
William Head 16,230 A #11393 [1698]
Payments to: Peter Paggen & Co,, Clarke Skinner to William Dent, Thomas Tarry (administrator of ------ Truman), - probably Thomas Truman who died in 1685
Adminiatrator/Executor: John Bigger,
===
Hollyday, Thomas, Prince George's County, 20th Feb.,1703.
To son James and hrs., dwelling plantation,, "Billingsley Point. "
to dau. Margery and hrs., 500 A "Holliday 's Choice."
to son Leonard and hrs.., residue of real estate.
to cous. William Holliday, to mother, Anne Skinner, brother and sister, Thomas and Martha Greenfield, personalty.
to child. afsd., residue of personalty.
Ex.: Thos. Greenfield.
Thos. Greenfield, Wm. Holliday, Robt, Skinner and Clarke Skinner, guardians of child. during minority.
Test: Jas. Stoddard., Robt. Owen., Wm. Greenup, Jno. Browne. MCW 11.279.
===
Elsey, John, Calvert County, 3rd Mch., 1699; 5th June, 1700.
To John Tanehill., personalty.
Wife Ann, extx. and residuary legatee of estate., real and personal.
Overseer: Clarke Skinner.
Test: Jno. Underwood, Margaret Underwood. 11.4.
===
Joseph Ireland 23.28 A CA £27.16.0 £12.7.0 Apr 24 1703
Payments to: William Parker, Mr. Thomas Tasker, John Smith by George Smith, Jr., John Smith by William Sturmay (?), Dr. Joachim Kisceley by William Parker per Clark Skinner.
Administratrix: Elisabeth Ireland
===
Skinner, Ann, widow, Calvert Co., 4th May, 1713; 19th June, 1714.
To dau. Greenfield, dau. Elizabeth Green and each grandchild. ----, personalty.
To eld. son Clarke (Skinner), ½ residue of estate,
Balance to be divided between 2 young, sons William and Adderton.
Exs.: 3 sons afsd.
Test: Jno. Mackall, Mary Monk, Gabriel Parker. 13. 703.
By codicil, 30th July, 1713: To young, son Adderton Skinner, testator's portion of "The Reserve" as devised her by last husband, Robert Skinner.
===
Ann Skinner 36B.20 A CA £167.9.7 £172.2.7 Mar 1 1714/15
Received from: Joshua Cecill.
Payments to: Christian Swarmstead, Dr. Thomas Corne, William Bladen, Esq.
Legatees:
Mrs. Martha Greenfield,
7 children (unnamed) of Martha Greenfield,
3 children (unnamed) of Col. Holladay,
daughter (unnamed) Mrs. Elisabeth Greene,
2 children (unnamed) of Mrs. Elisabeth Greene,
4 children (unnamed) of Adderton Skinner,
6 children (unnamed) of William Skinner,
child (unnamed) of Clarke Skinner.
Distribution to: Mr. Clarke Skinner (½), Mr. William Skinner (1/4), Mr. Adderton Skinner (1/4).
Executors (surviving): Mr. Adderton Skinner, William Skinner.
===
Prince George's County Land Records, Folio 8 o Indenture, 10 Jul 1702
From: Roger Brooke, Gent. of Calvert County
To: Thomas Blandford, planter of Prince George's County
Timberland, 154 acres in Prince George's County for 50£; bounded by Brooke Wood owned by Robert Brooke and land sold by Thomas Brooke to Thomas Bratt Signed: Roger Brooke (mark)
Witnessed: Tho. Taney, Clarke Skinner, Martha
Memorandum: witnessed by Thos. Greenfeild and Just Provin
Alienation: 23 Feb 1702 Thos. Blandford paid the sum of 6s Recorded: 1 Sep 1702
===
Prince George's County Land Records, Folio 14a; Indenture, 12 Aug 1702 From: William Skinner, planter of Calvert County
To: Clarke Skinner, planter of Calvert County
The Lord Baron of Baltimore did grant at St. Mary's on 23 Jun 1680 to James Nuthall 300 acres in the woods on the west side of the Patuxent River called Hatchett; James Nuthall and his wife Margaret sold the land to Robert Skinner 8 Mar 1686; Robert Skinner gave the land to his 3rd son William Skinner and he sold 111 acres of the land to his brother, Clarke Skinner, for an uspecified amount of money; bounded by land Cornelius Cannaday sold Ignatius Craycroft
Endorsem*nt on back: Elizabeth Skinner examined by Thom. Hollyday and Rob't Bradley Witnessed: Thom. Hollyday, Rob't Bradley, and Igna. Craycroft
Vide ye alienation in Folio 43
===
Prince George's County Land Records, Folio 189; Indenture, 11 Aug 1707
From: Clarke Skinner of Calvert County
To Phillip Tottershell of Prince George's County
For the sum of 308 a 110 acre part of land called Ladsford's Guift; bounded by land belonging to Banard Johnson and land laid out for Cornelius Caniday now owned by Ignatius Craycroft
signed: Clarke Skinner
witnessed: Rd. Marsham and James Greenfeild
Memorandum: 11 Aug 1707 Ruth Skinner, wife of Clarke, examined by Thomas Greenfeild
Alienation: 24 Sep 1707 Phillip Tottershell paid the sum of 4s/5p
===
*****
In August 2000 I received this absolutely fascinating e-mail which persuasively argues that Anne Mackall did not marry Andrew Taneyhill much less bear his children.

Dear Robert;
I recently came across your web page on the Mackall family of Calvert County, Maryland. Sad to say that the error re: the wife of Andrew Tanyhill will likely continue forever due to the same being recorded in several prominent genealogical works of many years ago.

Ann/Anne Mackall was not the wife of the immigrant Andrew Tanyhill, my gggggg grandfather; her given name was indeed Anne but after many years of research, Ann's surname remains unknown. The confusion over Anne probably arose due to the fact that there were three Anne Skinners extant during the early 1700s in Calvert County.
There was
1) ANNE ( ) HOLLYDAY SKINNER, wife of Robert Skinner Sr. & mother of Clarke, Robert, Jr., Adderton, William Skinner, who died in 1714;
2) there was Anne ( ) TANYHILL SHORT SKINNER, the widow of Andrew Tanyhill & John Short & the wife of Clarke Skinner, who died around February 1715/16; and finally there was
3) ANNE MACKALL TANEY SKINNER [later BRUCE], the wife of Robert Skinner, Jr., (the brother of Clarke Skinner) who died 1712. The latter was the mother of Mary Taney whose will gave the names of her Skinner half siblings.

The administration bond of Benjamin Short, administrator of Anne Tanyhill Short Skinner was dated 8 Feb. 1716; his surety was Richard Hall. An inventory of Ann's estate was taken 18 Feb. of the same year & signed by Eliz. Bowen [her daughter] as nearest of kin. It is apparent from the inventory that Anne was living with daughter Elizabeth Bowen as it listed items at the 'Whome House' as well as items 'At Nathaniel Bowens.' No account of Ann's estate has been located in the MD Prerogative Court records but in 1718, Benjamin Short was cited by the Court re: an account. Clarke Skinner, Ann's third husband died in 1714 & she was admx. of his estate; following her death in 1715/16, Benjamin Short completed the administration of Clarke Skinner's estate as well as administering Ann's estate.

Anne Tanyhill Short Skinner many have been nee Hall & she may have been a relation of the immigrant Richard Hall of Calvert County, Maryland whose will she witnessed. In the few recorded documents re: Anne &/or her children, one of the Hall family either witnesses or is a surety.

This error re: the wife of Andrew Tanyhill could have been avoided if early researchers had dug a bit deeper & examined all the documents relating to Anne Skinner. As it stands now, the error will probably perpetuate itself forever.

Regards,
Rebekah Boyd

I have not presumed to immediately discard the overwhelming opinion of earlier researchers and change this presentation of the Mackall lineage. The input of all those interested is valuable and sought.

===
Calvert County Circuit Court Land Surveys and Condominium Plats

Skinners Chance, 120 Acres; Patent
Developer/Owner: Skinner, Clark 1700 Patent Record WD, p. 271 0 0 MSA S 1583-1426

Child of Clarke Skinner and Ann ? is:
59 i. Ann Skinner, born Abt. 1710 in Calvert Co., MD?; married Samuel Griffith, Jr. Abt. 1730.

Generation No. 8

194. Walter Daux, born Abt. 1625 in probably England; died Abt. 1658 in probably Charles City Co., VA. He was the son of 388. Richard Daux. He married 195. Mary Feb?.
195. Mary Feb?, born Abt. 1629 in Pays De Aunis, La Rochelle, France?.

Notes for Walter Daux:
The following has been copied and pasted from the Burgess Family and Relatives: Daux Family website, http://www.surnames.com/gedcom/burgess_jim/i0000457.htm#i457

2. Walter2 Daux (Richard1) was born about 1625. Walter died 1658 in Charles, Va.

He married Mary FEB. Mary was born in Of Pays De Aunis, La Rochelle, France about 1629. Court Orders Charles City County, Virginia 1658-1661 Book 1 page 148 Abstract John Flower married Mary Daux the Relict of Walter Daux deceased Children of Mary Daux (now my wife) give unto John Plaine the son of said Mary by her former husband Robert Plaine Dated 24 May 1658 Witnesses John Stith, Howard Pryse, 25 Jun 1658 Book page 203 Walter Daukes owned land in Charles City County, Virginia 2 Dec 1664 page 517 page 163 (209) John Flower gives bond and caution to William Odeon tobbaco consigned by Walter Daux deceased to his father Richard Daux of London, England. page 549 (356 Pettition Richard Rawlins and Jno Witt to court to shed light on the matter. Walter Daux who settled Charles City County, Virginia about 1663 and died before 1674, two orphan daughters Susan Daus married Richard Rawlins, her sister n(name not given married John Witt who probably died in that county. Some years later John and William Witt, grandsons of Walter Daux purchased 300 acres of land on the branches of Tucahoo Creek on the north side of James River near Manakin Ferry (in what is now Goochland County.) Volume 11 Beverly Fleet, Charles City Court Orders 1658-1661 page 148 John Flower for and in consideration of marriage with Mary the Relick of Walter Dauxdeceased and in consideration of my love and affection to the children of the said Mary Daux now my wife give unto John Plaine the son of the said Mary by her former husband Robert Plaine deceased 2 steers, a bed and other furniture and household stuff alos unto Ann Daux 3 cows certain furniture and also to Susan Daux cattle, household furniture, etc. The land descended from Robert Plaine to his heirs dated 24 May 1658 Wit John Stith, Howell Pryre Signed John Flower dated 24 May 1658 Recorded 25 Jun 1658. In 1663 Cavaliers and Pioneers John Stith received land fro transportation of Walt Daux. p163 Vol 11 Beverly Fleet in John Flower administration of Walter Daux estate Walter Daux deceased had shipped tobacco to his father Richard Daux of London. Indenture mades this 14 day of September 1715 between Charles Hudson and Mary his wife of the County of Charles Citty and John Witt and Wm Witt of the same County 300 acres more or less lying and being in the county of Honaricho at a place caled Tuckahoe and bounged as in said indenture is dol to Jn Witt and Wm Witt taken possession 3 Oct 1715 in Henrico County, Virginia.

Walter Daux and Mary had the following children:

3 i. Ann3 Daux was born in Of Charles Count, Virginia about 1645. She married John_i Witt in Charles City, Virginia, about 1669. John_i was born in Herefordshire, England 1645. He was the son of Robert Whytt. John_i died 1715 in Charles City Cou, Virginia. (See John_i Witt for the continuation of this line.)

4 ii. Susan Daux was born in Of St Charles Co, Virginia about 1647. She married Richard Rawlins in Charles City, Virginia, about 1665. Richard was born in Of St Charles Co, Virginia about 1643.

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http://mv.ancestry.com/viewer/8a8dd54c-2d04-4f1d-bb77-4d74f07af4ec/67552035/40198149433

In Search of Walter Daux

Posted by Pamela Wilson

French or English?

Many family genealogists have assumed that Walter Daux was French, based on nothing more than the fact that the name "sounds French". The truth is that the name could be either English or French. But whatever the origin of the name, the evidence tells us that Walter Daux himself was English.

In old English an "x" in the middle or the end of a word was pronounced "ks". Thus to an English-speaking clerk Dawkes and Daux were pronounced identically. Thus it's not surprising that we find that in early records of Charles City County the spellings Dawkes, Daukes, andDaux(e) were used interchangeably. We find the same phenomenon in English parish registers of the 1500s and 1600s. In more distant timesDauxe (alder tree) was a French surname while Dawkes or Daukes (a diminutive form of David, the same root as Dawkins) was English. But in England both spellings were used interchangeably. Thus Walter Daux's immediate ancestors could have been either English or French. Walter Daux himself was undeniably English. The given name Walter, his father's residence in London, and the circ*mstance of how and where he appears in Virginia, convincingly argue that Walter Daux was an Englishman.

Indeed, virtually all immigrants to Virginia in the early and mid 1600s were English men and women. Although there are records of the occasional foreigner, they are rare. Under English law, foreign-born residents dealt with a number of restrictions that made settlement in the Colonies unattractive. Foreigners immigrating into Virginia could not buy or sell land, hold office, vote, or exercise any other political rights. The Navigation Act even prevented foreigners from enjoying the occupation of merchant.

Foreigners needed to be naturalized to acquire the rights of citizenship. Before 1680 all naturalizations in Virginia required an Act of Virginia's General Assembly.1 Those legislative naturalizations, which contain precious few names, are preserved and contain neither Witt nor Daux. After 1680 the process was greatly simplified, and most of its records are now lost, but in the timeframe in which Walter Daux lived in Virginia we can safely conclude that he was English born or had been naturalized in England.

It should also be remembered that during the 1600s the spelling of one's name was shockingly casual and imprecise. For instance, the surviving signatures of William Shakespeare never spell his name the same way twice. And Sir Walter Raleigh spelled his own name more than a dozen different ways — but, oddly, never as "Raleigh". Thus Dauks, Dawkes, Daux and variations may be the same name. That becomes clear when we examine the records, as below.

Some Early Dawkes/Daux Immigrants to Virginia

John Dauxe, gentleman, came to Jamestown in 1608 in the Second Supply of settlers. A Mary Dauks (also Dawks) arrived on the Warwick in 1621 and was listed among the dead after the 1622 massacre. A widow named Joan Dawkes and a Thomas Dauks also appear in Jamestown records.Henry Dawkes obtained from the Virginia Company a Bill of Adventure in 1608, indicating that he planed to emigrate to the colony.2 In 1632 his son William Dawkes of Charles City County received a patent for 200 acres in Charles City County, of which 100 acres was due as heir of his father Henry Dawkes for his personal adventure3 and another 100 acres for Henry Dawke's 1608 bill of adventure.4 His name is spelledWilliam Dauxe in at least one record.5 William Dawkes leased another 50 acres adjoining a few months later.6 These 250 acres were located in what became Henrico County, about two miles west of the eventual border between Henrico and Charles City counties, very close to where we find Walter Daux a few years later.

Walter Daukes/Daux & His Family

A Walter Daukes was one of 39 persons claimed as headrights by William Perry in 1633, for which his son Henry Perry patented 2,000 acres in Charles City County in 1637.7 Perry's patent was located a few miles down the James River from the William Dawkes patent. Almost thirty years later in 1664 a patent for land adjoining Henry Perry claimed a "Walt. Daux" as one of ten headrights. Whether this was the same Walter Daux or not isn't clear.

Given the proximity of these patents, it seems possible that Walter Daux was a relative of William Dawkes. (The difference in spelling might be simply a matter of a different generation of clerks recording the name.) Interestingly, a John Rogers, perhaps related to the John Rogers whose daughter married John Witt II, purchased land in 1664 adjoining the land of Walter Daux.

Owing to the near total destruction of early Charles City County records, we have no other records of Walter Daux during his lifetime. However, we can identify his wife and his two children from postmortem records. And we can identify his father as Richard Daux of London.

Walter Daux was perhaps born sometime in the 1620s or early 1630s, as he married a woman named Mary and had two daughters in the early or mid 1650s. Charles City County court records tell us that Mary, whose maiden name is unknown, had first married Robert Plaine by whom she had a son named John Plaine. She was widowed and then married Walter Daux and had two daughters named Ann and Susanna Daux before being widowed a second time. She then married for a third time to John Flower(s) Jr., the son of a wealthy ship's captain who had evidently inherited the part of his father's estate that lay in Charles City County.

This final marriage took place before 24 May 1658 when John Flowers made deeds of gift to the children of his wife "Mary the relict of Walter Daux" spelling out the above relationships quite clearly.8 One child was John Plaine "the son of the sd Mary by her former husband Robert Plaine decd." The other children were Ann and "Susan" Daux. Several days later, on 3 June 1658, John Flower was granted administration of the estate of Walter Daux "having married the relict of sd. Daux." Fleet's abstract of the deed of gift indicates that Robert Plaine had owned land at his death which fell to the son John Plaine, and indeed John Flower claimed that land in 1668, the son John Plaine having died by then.9 Walter Daux had evidently owned land as well, or lived on the Plaine property, as there are three records for John Flower regarding a shipment of two hogsheads of tobacco by Walter Daux to his father Richard Daux of London. (Fleet, p156 and p209, both references in 1658, and p243 in 1661.)) There is also a reference to the land of Walter Daux as late as 1664 when Edward Hill sold land adjacent Walter Daux.

In 1658 the Charles City court ordered an accounting of all orphans estates within the county, but Flower evidently failed to deliver, as in early 1659 the court ordered the sheriff to seize the estate of Flower or Daux until an accounting was rendered.10 He apparently did not do so, because on 3 June 1659 the court appointed two officials to appraise the estate of Walter Daux "and divide the same to the relict and his two children".11 A few months later, John Flower was allowed 1000 pounds of tobacco out of the estate "in consideration of his wife's bedding".12 The following year, in late 1660, Flower made a bond for the estate of Walter Daux for "carefull keeping and educating the orphanes of the sd Daux during their minority."13

There is at this point a gap in the Charles City County court records. Only a fragmentary book for 1672-3 and an order book for 1677-79 are preserved. It appears that John Flower died in the interim, as there is no further record of him. The two Daux children evidently married about 1673. Richard Rawlins14, who married Susannah Daux, and John Witt, who married Ann Daux, petitioned the court on 3 October 1673.15 The substance of the petition is not recorded, and the court records stop at that point, but from later records it is clear they were attempting to recover the estate of Walter Daux due to their wives. (The wives may have still been minors at the time, not eligible to receive the estate until their marriages.) The petition must not have been satisfied, for a year later, on 1 October 1674, John Witt and "Susannah" Rawlins were suing the commissioners of Charles City County in the colonial court. (Richard Rawlins had apparently died in the intervening year.) The case was deferred and, on 3 March 1674/5, the case of "Jno. Witt and Richard Rawlins who marryed the two orpts. of Walter Daux, dec'd" was deferred again.16 The case is not mentioned again, and was apparently not resolved. Three years later, on 14 February 1677/8 when the court records resume, John Witt and John Turberfield17 (who had married Susannah Rawlins) are found suing a justice of Charles City County for the value of the estate of Walter Daux. The suit claimed that "the estate was appraised and divided between the two Daux sisters. The court did not demand security of Flowers and he has wasted the estate. The plts. having married the sd. orphans now demand recompense by the court…The plts. ask the court to have the deft. pay Daux's daughters according to the inventory as recorded."18 The husbands were evidently suing the justices who were sitting in 1658, whom they claimed should be liable for the estate's value.19 The court ordered the payment, but one of the justices at the time appealed the judgment.20 William Randolph (remember him?) was security for the plaintiffs. Unfortunately, there is no further mention of the case.

I might point out here that the orphans themselves apparently did not initiate any suits. That suggests they may not have been of age – most Virginia women in the 1670s had married by the age of 17, and the mean age at marriage was 18. Further, the timing suggests they had recently married.21 The first record of the suit is in September 1673 by Richard Rawlins alone, joined by John Witt a month later. Both John Flowers and his wife Mary apparently died before 1672. Neither is mentioned after the court records resume in 1672, and presumably Flowers was not available to be sued in 1673.

John Turberville, the second husband of Susan(ah) Daux, evidently died by August 1694 when Mary and John Turberville chose guardians. Both children would have been at least 16 to have the right to choose a guardian, but both were probably under 19 since the marriage couldn't have occurred prior to 1675

Walter Daux's Father was Richard Daux of London

Before his death Walter Daux had shipped two hogsheads of tobacco to England by Captain William Odeon, and John Flower sued Odeon for the proceeds.22 On 4 October 1658 the Charles City County court ordered William Odeon to account for the shipment as it now belonged to John Flower by virtue of his marriage to Daux's widow. Two months later the court ordered John Flower to give bond to William Odeon for freight and other charges of two hogsheads of tobacco "consigned by Walter Daux dec'd to his father Richd. Daux of London".23 Flower eventually collected from Odeon, the record noting that the tobacco "was legally deliv'red or disposed in London."24 The outcome is unknown, as the last entry in the surviving court records is a continuance until Captain Odeon, who was apparently at sea, "shall come into these parts."25

A hogshead of tobacco in those days was nearly 1,000 pounds, worth about $25-$30 depending on quality.26 One person could cultivate about three or four acres of tobacco yielding perhaps 1,500 pounds. Two hogsheads probably represented the annual production of two field workers, less costs.

In Search of Richard Daux of London

The Daux name appears in England as early as the 1300s.27 And Richard Daux was not quite as rare a name as we might hope. In fact, a Richard Daukes of London is mentioned as early as the year 1338.28

Some persons of this name appear to have been in England for centuries before Walter Daux settled in Virginia. Others may have been immigrants into England from France a few generations earlier.

Richard Daux of Stratford-on-Avon

The interchangeability of spelling is illustrated by Richard Daux of Stratford-on-Avon in Warwickshire, who was proposed (incorrectly) several years ago by a Witt-Harbour researcher as the father of Walter Daux.29 His name is spelled variously as Dauxe, Dauxe, Daukes, and Dawkes in local and parish records. A history of Warwick notes that "Richard Dawkes, described also as a plumber, recast the great bell of the Chapel in 1606 and one of the bells of St. Nicholas Warwick in 1619. He may also have been responsible for a number of Worcestershire bells. He died in 1627."30 I might note that the records of the bells actually spell the name Daukes. He may originally have been from Worcester (about 20 miles west) as records there show the christening of his illegitimate son Andrew in 1586 and his marriage to Annes Taylor in 1586. Indeed one authority believes that he may have had his foundry in Worcester, commenting that he was "of Evesham" in 1606 but many bells in Worcestershire cast in the period bear the initials R. D.31 He was at least briefly a vestryman in Stratford-on-Avon.32

The Warwickshire parish records show baptisms of his children named "Jone" (1607), John (1613), Alexander (1618), and Joane (1626). These records also record his burial on 27 January 1626/7.

Richard Daux of Dover

Another possible origin for Walter Daux is the family of Richard Dawkes, a merchant of Dover, located about 80 miles from London, in the early 1600s. He is described in several records as a gentleman whose dealt in textiles (he's referred to as both a mercer and a merchant.) Canterbury marriage records mention several of his children: Richard Dawkes Jr. (born about 1607), Catherine (born about 1595), Susan and Judith (both born about 1605), Thomas (born about 1610), and William (born about 1613).33 Richard Dawles Sr. was dead by 16 November 1644 when his widow remarried, but his son Richard Dawkes is also described in these records as a merchant, and may have later moved to London. Richard Dawkes Jr. married Ann March in 1634, however, which is about the outside limit for the birth of Walter Daux. It was apparently the son Richard Dawkes who seized Dover Castle for Cromwell in 1642.34 Richard Dawkes may have been the son of Thomas Dawkes. Who appears in 16th century records of Canterbury. A Kent history mentions that his sons Thomas and William were sent to London to train as shipwrights, whereupon they returned to Dover.35

Another Richard Daux

Still another Richard Dawkes is mentioned in the will of Richard Upton of Hereford dated 14 October 1588.36 The will identifies Richard Dawkes and Robert Dawkes as his nephews and mentions a John Dawkes. The will leaves a cow to Joyce Dawkes, daughter of Richard Dawkes.

1. After 1680 the Governor could grant citizenship, but few of those records have survived. [?]

2. Virginia Patent Book 1, p115. [?]

3. Meaning that Henry Dawkes actually traveled to Virginia. [?]

4. Virginia Patent Book 1, p114-5. [?]

5. Virginia Patent Book 1, p434. [?]

6. Virginia Patent Book 1, p138. [?]

7. Virginia Patent Book 1, p510. [?]

8. Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, Beverley Fleet (Genealogical Publishing Co., 1988), p203 contains both references in this paragraph, from Charles City County Court Orders 1655-58, p146 and p148. [?]

9. Virginia Patent Book 6, p205. To John Flowre 750 acres between Shirley Hundred and Turkey Island Creek "formerly possest by Robt. Playne dec'd, granted to Eliza Grayne (Graves?), widow and by her (by the name of Heyman) transferred to sd Playne and lately found to escheat [in 1667]…and no granted [to Flower]." This is proof that the son John Plaine had died without heirs (that's the meaning of "escheated" land). The land had been patented by Elizabeth Grayne in 1638 (VPB 2, p580), described as bordered on the west by the river. [?]

10. Ibid., p213, at a court held 25 February 1658/9. [?]

11. [1] Ibid., p217. [?]

12. Ibid., p221. [?]

13. Ibid., p234, at a court held 3 October 1660. [?]

14. "Richd. Rawlings" was claimed as a headright by George Pace of Charles City County in 1650. (VPB 2, p252). [?]

15. Ibid., p549. (This section is court orders 1672-3). [?]

16. Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, 1622-1632, 1670-1676, H. R. McIlwaine, (The Colonial Press, Everett Waddy Co., 1924), p403. [?]

17. The name appears as both Turberfield and Turberville in the records. He deposed he was aged 24 in 1673. [?]

18. Quotation is from the abstract, not the original. [?]

19. The county justices were indeed legally responsible for preservation of decedent's estates. Indeed, the purpose of administrator's bonds was to indemnify the justices. If the administrator looted the estate and was dead or destitute, the heirs could legitimately seek to recover from the justices who appointed the administrator. [?]

20. Charles City County Order Book 1676-1679, Margaret Mitchell Ayres (1968), p42 (and see page 4 of addendum for correction of spelling to "Whitt". [?]

21. There is a reference in Fleet (p236) to "Rawlins wife" in a deposition concerning events around Christmas 1672. [?]

22. Charles City Court Orders 1658-1661, p158. [?]

23. Ibid., p163. [?]

24. Ibid., p276. [?]

25. Ibid., p278. [?]

26. Tobacco prices had been dropping steadily since 1622, and had reached a penny a pound by 1670. [?]

27. In the form of Sir Henry Daux. [?]

28. Calendar of the Plea and Memoranda Rolls of the City of London: Vol. 1: 1323-1364, A.H. Thomas, ed. (1926). [?]

29. Harbour Family Association Newsletter, Vol. 3, No. 1 (1980). This mentions an indictment against Richard Daux and twelve others which was later dismissed. This man died some 30 years before Charles City County records reference Richard Daux of London. [?]

30. A History of the County of Warwick, Vol. 3, Phillip Styles ed. (1945). A footnote states: See Tilley and Walters, Church Bells of Warw. 56, 229, 253. He is there described as of Worcester, but the frequent references to him in local records make it most probable that he was a Stratford man. As Richard Dawkes, plumber, he first appears in 1605 (Par. Reg. i. 72). In 1624 he contracted with the churchwardens for releading the south side of the church (Vestry Min. Bk., 1617–99, p. 24). He was buried at Stratford 27 Jan. 1627 (Par. Reg. iii, 12). [?]

31. The Church Bells of Warwickshire, Rev. H. T. Tilley (1910), p56 and pp229-231. [?]

32. The Vestry Minute-Book Parish of Stratford-on-Avon 1617-1699. [?]

33. Canterbury Marriage Licenses, Vol.2, Joseph Meadows Cowper, pp 25, 132, 163, 274, 275, 944, 964, and 1075. The marriage licenses give their approximate ages at marriage. [?]

34. Annals of Dover, John Bavington Jones, (1916), p29. [?]

35. Early Modern Kent 1540-1640, Michael Zell (2000), p131. [?]

36. Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica (Google Books), p319. [?]

Copyright by Robert W. Baird

More About Walter Daux:
Residence: London, England

Children of Walter Daux and Mary Feb? are:
i. Susan Daux, born Abt. 1647.
97 ii. Ann Daux, born Abt. 1650 in possibly Charles City Co., VA; married John Witt Oct 1669 in Charles City Co., VA.

200. Estienne Chastain, born 30 Mar 1625 in Charost, Berri, France; died Abt. 1694 in Charost, Berri, France. He was the son of 400. Jacques Chastain and 401. Jeanne Audet. He married 201. Jeanne Laurent.
201. Jeanne Laurent, born Abt. 1627 in Charost, Berri, France. She was the daughter of 402. Pierre Laurent.

More About Estienne Chastain:
Occupation: Bet. 1648 - 1694, Notaire royal at Charost

Child of Estienne Chastain and Jeanne Laurent is:
100 i. Dr. Pierre Jacques Chastain, born Apr 1659 in Charost, Berri, France; died 1728 in present-day "Monacan Farm," 1000 Huguenot Trail across from Manakin Episcopal Church, Powhatan County, Virginia USA (then Manakintowne French Huguenot settlement in Goochland County); married (1) Suzanne Reynaud 27 Jan 1687 in Saint Cyr Issoudun Catholic Church; married (2) Anne Soblet Abt. 1701; married (3) Mary "Magdelaine" Verrueil Aft. 1723.

202. Jacques Reynault? He married 203. Anne Jupille?.
203. Anne Jupille?

Child of Jacques Reynault? and Anne Jupille? is:
101 i. Suzanne Reynaud, born Abt. 1666 in Issoudon, Berri, France; died 1700 in high seas on voyage to America; married Dr. Pierre Jacques Chastain 27 Jan 1687 in Saint Cyr Issoudun Catholic Church.

224. Mareen Duvall, born Abt. 1620 in Laval, Brittany, France?; died Abt. 1694 in "Middle Plantation" near present-day Davidsonville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA. He was the son of 448. ? Duvall. He married 225. ?.
225. ?

Notes for Mareen Duvall:
Mareen Duvall
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mareen Duvall (1625–1699)[1] was a French Huguenot and an early American settler.

[edit] Background
He was born Marin duVal, at Nantes, France in 1625 and arrived in the Province of Maryland on August 28, 1650. He received a patent from the first proprietors of the Maryland Colony, the Calvert family on that day for La Val, named after his family's estate in the County of Laval situated between County of Maine, Duchy of Brittany, Duchy of Normandy and Duchy of Anjou in France, on the south side the South River in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.[2]

He became quite prosperous and his Middle Plantation in Davidsonville, Maryland and La Val were "as luxurious and courtly as any of the manors of the English gentry."[3]

He died in 1699 and his third and final wife, Mary Stanton, administered his substantial estate.[2][4] Duvall had purchased sizeable tracts of land, including Catton, later known as Belair[5] as well as owning Middle Plantation in Davidsonville, Maryland. Combined, he owned several thousand acres in Anne Arundel and Prince George's Counties.[2]

In 1705, his son, John Duvall and his wife Mary deeded the land to Queen Anne Parish to construct St. Barnabas Church.[2] Mareen Duvall's widow, Mary went on to marry Henry Ridgely and later after his death, Reverend Jacob Henderson.[5]

[edit] Genealogy
In genealogies, he is often called "the emigrant" to distinguish him from descendents also named Mareen Duvall.[6]

His notable descendents include United States President Barack Obama,[7][8] President Harry S. Truman,[9] Vice-President Dick Cheney,[7][8] Bessie Wallis Warfield Simpson (for whom Edward VIII gave up the throne),[9] U.S. Associate Supreme Court Justice Gabriel Duvall, Confederate spy Betty Duvall and actor Robert Duvall.[9]

[edit] References
^ Baltz, Shirley Vlasak (1984). A Chronicle of Belair. Bowie, Maryland: Bowie Heritage Committee. pp. page 5.
^ a b c d Williams, T. J. C.; Folger McKinsey (1910,1979). History of Frederick County, Maryland, Vol 2. L.R. tit*worth & Co./Clearfield Co. pp. page 948. ISBN 0806380128. http://books.google.com/books?id=a-M8wQ27_NsC&pg=RA1-PA948&dq=%22Mareen+Duvall%22+Mary+Stanton&as_brr=3&ie=ISO-8859-1&sig=3wm1OuhXkpuyU-W9yPxP2u_qICU.
^ Richardson, Hester Dorsey (1903). Side-lights on Maryland History: With Sketches of Early Maryland Families. Baltimore, Maryland: Williams and Wilkins Company. pp. 96. ISBN 0806302968. http://books.google.com/books?id=l_oMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA191&dq=Anne+Tasker+Samuel+Ogle#PPA96,M1.
^ Warfield, Joshua Dorsey (July 1905). The Founders of Anne Arundel And Howard Counties, Maryland. Baltimore, Maryland: Kohn & Pollock. pp. 106. ISBN 0806379715. http://books.google.com/books?id=vgINAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA78&dq=%22Mareen+Duvall%22+Mary+Stanton&as_brr=1&ie=ISO-8859-1#PPA106,M1.
^ a b Baltz, Shirley Vlasak (1984). A Chronicle of Belair. Bowie, Maryland: Bowie Heritage Committee. pp. pages 1-8.
^ "First Generation". A Partial Listing of Descendants of Mareen Duvall "the Emigrant". http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/duvall/d18610.htm. [unreliable source?]
^ a b Hasani Gittens (October 17, 2007). "Dissing cousins: Obama, Cheney, Bush related". http://www.nypost.com/seven/10172007/news/regionalnews/dissing_cousins__obama__cheney.htm. Mentions Chicago Sun-Times article from early September as the source.
^ a b "Obama and Cheney, Making Connections". October 17, 2007. p. A06. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/16/AR2007101602362.html.
^ a b c "Notable Descendants of Mareen Duvall". http://www.duvallsociety.org/notables.html. [unreliable source?]
[edit] Further reading
William P. Doepkins, Excavations at Mareen Duvall's Middle Plantation of South River Hundred (Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1991)

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The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

MAREEN DU VALL, GENT.
16..... - 1694

Mareen DuVall entered the Province of Maryland during the sixteen fifties, a period of much political and social unrest in the British Isles and France. Charles I had been executed at Whitehall in 1649, the monarchy and the House of Lords had been abolished by the Puritans or leftists of that day, and Cromwell with his Army reigned supreme. The Scots, ever loyal to the House of Stuart, and the English non-Puritans proclaimed Charles, son of Charles 1, as their King. He as Charles II landed in Scotland in June 1651, and with the support of the Scot Army he sustained defeat by the superior forces of Cromwell at Worcester on September 3, 1651. Many of Charles' soldiers were taken prisoners, but he ultimately escaped to France where he remained in exile for nine years.
At that time Louis XIV was still a minor and his country was ruled by Mazarin, a Spanish Roman Catholic and pupil of Richelieu, who had little or no sympathy with the Huguenots.
In 1660 after the death of Cromwell and a country grown ill of the Puritan ruffians, Charles II made his successful entry into London and was acknowledged by Parliament and the Peers, and in 1661 Louis XIV assumed his actual reign in France. So it was during those extra­ordinary times in French and English history when neither the con­servatives nor the Huguenots were popular in their respective lands that Mareen DuVall, a known conservative, found his way to the Province of Maryland.
It is known and proved by documents that he was a Jacobite or follower of James Stuart, the son of Charles II, thus proving his conservativism or opposition to the liberal elements which supported the Dutch claims of William and Mary of Orange. It is also proved that Mareen DuVall was brought into the Province by William Burgess, one-time Quaker and sympathizer of the Puritan regime in Maryland. Furthermore, it is proved that he served a certain period of indentureship under John Covell.*
In the absence of contemporary documents, these objective facts offer much for the imagination and supposition. A statement has been made, though proof is lacking, that Mareen DuVall had served in the Scot Army which is not altogether improbable, for he, as a young man, could have been a part of Charles' Army which was captured by Cromwell in 1651. France and Scotland were traditional allies and enemies of England. This was certainly exemplified during the conflicts between Mary Stuart and Elizabeth Tudor. But the theory that he was a political refugee of France rather than Great Britain seems more within the realm of conceivability.
But about the time of the defeat of Charles' army in 1651, there was living in Normandy a Frenchman by the name of Marin Duval who on December 2, 1651, took an oath before the Norman Parliament at Rouen as Special Civil Lieutenant for Andleys.*
The post had previously been held by Pierre Corneille, the dramatist, who had resigned in Duval's favour. If this civil officer were later the Mareen Duvall of Laval and Middle Plantation, it adds much to the factual history of our ancestor, but there is always that question. Could it have been his father, uncle, or cousin?
If he were the Maryland emigre, he was necessarily young in 1651, and a civil lieutenant would essentially have some knowledge of Roman jurisprudence, and it is a matter of public record that Mareen Duvall at the time of his death had legal books in his library. But there are always eternal questions when one is dealing with tangible facts - were these law books in French or English?
When reviewing the French scene the circ*mstances which brought our ancestor to the Province of Maryland may have been more political than religious and Judge Gabriel Duvall may have stated only a half truth. To the average mind Huguenot and religious persecu­tion are synonymous, but Huguenotism, like English Puritanism, was fundamentally quite as much a political as a religious force, and had derived its aspirations and drawn much of its strength from jealousy of the power which the King was acquiring. Its adherents were drawn for the most part from the towns of the south of France and among the smaller nobility - the country seigneurs. That he was a French protestant, we can not deny, but after the Huguenot rising in 1625 and the subsequent treaty of Montpellier under Richelieu's diplomacy, persecution of the Huguenots gradually ceased and Richelieu before his death in 1642 had virtually destroyed the political privileges and power of the Huguenots. But the years immediately preceding Mareen's exile to Maryland were far from calm politically and an examination of the events in Normandy and France as a whole may not be amiss.
At the death of Louis XIII in 1643, the five-year old heir, Louis XIV was placed under the regency of his mother Anne of Austria, but Cardinal Mazarin, a pupil of Richelieu and a Roman Catholic of Spanish birth, was actually the power. The feudal nobility resented the foreign influence at court and quickly rebelled to recover their once power which had been crushed by Richelieu. Civil War took actual shape in 1648, known in history as the Fronde. Normandy, Guienne, and Burgundy were first the principal centers of revolt. Normandy and Burgundy were eventually subdued, but Guienne resisted and its capital Bordeaux, traditionally the center of Huguenotism, was captured only after a protracted siege.
By 1652 the rebellion had taken on a national aspect and for eight months there was a desperate struggle between the nobles and the Crown, the latter drawing its support principally from the citizenry of Paris. The Crown ultimately won and the King entered Paris triumphantly at the head of his army on October 21, 1652, when peace, order, and monarchistic supremacy was reestablished after five years of strife. The feeling throughout the Kingdom was not so much against the Crown as it was against Mazarin. With collapse of the Frondeurs, Mazarin returned from exile and resumed his influence. The Duc de Conde who championed the Frondeurs finding his cause defeated fled to Spain and carried on an unofficial insurgent warfare for five years.
Mazarin before his death in 1661 with the support of the Puritans under Cromwell fought successfully a Spanish war which was brought to a close by the peace of the Pyrenees in 1660.
Returning to our ancestor Mareen and believing in the possibility of his being the young civil lieutenant of Andleys in 1651, we know that in later life he was conservative in his political life and having been bred in feudal traditions and being a subject of ancient Nor­mandy where the power and prestige of the nobility had always been respected, it is not at all unlikely that he fought with the nobles under Conde and against the despised Mazarin. Or it may be possible that he fled to Spain with Conde and was captured during one of the raids into France which seems more feasible, for a captured insurgent is more likely to be sold into bondage than a soldier of a defeated army. Youth of that day was adventurous and the thread of circ*mstances all adds color, glamour, and drama to the story, but not without its degree of desire for greater factual details and certainty.
The periods of indentureship varied. John Jacob served nine years, others lesser periods, but all servitude was gauged no doubt by their degree of treason, high crime, and misdemeanor. So it is quite within the realm of reality that Mareen Duvall, the young civil lieutenant, was captured, writs of exile issued, and then sold in the market place to the highest bidder. And inasmuch as Cromwell was an ally of Mazarin in the Spanish war, it may account for the fact how William Burgess, once a Quaker then a Puritan, became the "master" of a French refugee. If his indentureship were for five years, being exiled in 1652 or 1653, it would bring him to the year 1657 or about the time he became a freeholder, married, and begun life anew as a sub­ject of Lord Baltimore under the British Crown.
The exiling of political prisoners, war captives, and even criminals in the narrow sense to the Colonies and selling them for certain periods of indentureship was quite characteristic then as well as the early nineteenth century. While there is evidence of two ship loads of Jacobites who were captured after the Mar and Derwentwater's rising in 1715-1716 and sold at Annapolis to the highest bidder in 1717, no known documents are extant to prove why some very high-type Maryland settlers in the 1650s, such as Ninian Beall, John Jacob, Richard Warfield, and others should have served certain periods of service before they were afforded the rights of freeholders. The foregoing all became prominent subjects of the Lord Proprietary and the King, and the fact that they were listed as indentures lends much to be assumed.
By July 25, 1659, however, Maren Duvall had completed his period of service and as a freeholder applied for his rights to 50 acres of land. The following is an exact copy from the original entry:1

"Marin Du Vail demands fifty acres of land having performed his time of service with John Covell* and brought in by William Burgess. Warrant issued for fifty acres return 25 December next. Warrant renewed to John Jones for one hundred acres return 25 next."

William Burgess emigrated to Maryland in 1650 - before the decisive battle of Worcester in September 1651. Certain essential factors, however, are not available-the manner by which Burgess conveyed his claims on Duvall to Covell and how long Duvall served his period of indentureship. In the absence of documents it can be assumed that William Burgess, who maintained agents in Great Britain and who was responsible for transporting a number of settlers to Mary­land, became the "master" of a political prisoner and who later con­veyed him for a valuable consideration to John Covell.
Maren DuVall was schooled in letters, though we know not whether it occurred at home in France under a family tutor or at one of the French academies of that period. In 1664 he signed his name as Maren Duvall, the occasion being an inquest into the death of a servant of Joseph Fincher.2 He was also accorded the title of "Mr." bestowed at that period only on men of rank and fashion.3 In his liv­ing room at Middle Plantation, there were two law books, so his intellectual attainments can not be denied, all of which leans addi­tional inference to his being the civil lieutenant.
The tradition that he was a Huguenot is substantiated by his religi­ous worship in the Province. At that time there was no Calvinistic house of worship, if such were his preference, in Anne Arundel County, therefore, he and his family attended the English house of worship on the Ridge where the orthodox families of Anne Arundel first settled and established their church - distinct from the Puritan settlers of Providence on the north shore of the Severn and the Quakers around West River.
When the Church of England was proclaimed the Established Church of Maryland in 1692, his plantation in South River Hundred fell into the jurisdiction of All Hallow's Parish. When his sons and grandsons removed to Prince Georges County, they became staunch communicants of Queen Anne's Parish. Younger scions assisted in the organization of Prince Georges (Rock Creek) Parish and also in All Saints' Parish of Frederick County. The Episcopal faith there­fore became the traditional religion, and members clung with pride to the Church of England during the colonial period. When Maryland became a State within the Federal Union and the American Episcopal Church was organized, the Duvalls for the most part con­tinued their allegiance to that faith.
Most of the Duvalls later worshipped at the Chapel of Ease of Queen Anne's Parish, now the independent parish of Holy Trinity near Collington. Today it is a venerable shrine to the Duvall family where the remains of many lie buried in hallowed ground.
By the time Mareen Duvall applied for land in 1659, circ*mstances place him in the late twenties or it is quite possible that he could have even entered his thirties. Although under certain conditions, indentures could marry, there is no record of his marrying before 1658. It was not long, however, after his freedom that he married, for circ*mstances would place the birth of a son around 1660.
The name of his first Maryland wife, not altogether discounting the possibility of his having married first in France, has remained a mystery to her many descendants. She became the mother of his older children, but no evidence has been found to prove definitely her issue. Several family historians have made a demarcation between those of the two wives, but they have given no scientific reasons for their deductions and for the most part the deductions are believed to be psychological. Being French and trained in Gallic tradition, Mareen Esq., did not name the children in his will according to the old English custom of providing first for the son and heir and then each son in order of birth and lastly the daughters according to their seniority. But he did style Johannah as his youngest daughter. That there were several under age is proved by the fact that the minor boys were to attain their majority at 18 and the girls at 16.
Judge Gabriel Duvall believed there were five by the first wife and seven by the second, and he was probably correct. Judge Duvall made no allusions to a marriage in France. On the basis of his belief, the following deductions and conclusions have thus been made, rather than the belief of some that there were six by the first and likewise the same number by the second.
It is not unlikely that his first Maryland wife was the Mary Dewall who was an heir in the last will and testament of Thomas Bouth, of Calvert County, who died without issue in 1672, dating his will February 15, 1671/2. Quoting from the instrument "I give to Mary Dewall the first Cow Calfe that is Calved of my Cowes and one Sow Shoot."
It must be remembered that what is now Prince Georges was in that day Calvert County, with the Patuxent River as the common boundary between Anne Arundel and Calvert. Mareen Duvall lived only about three miles from the Patuxent and was thus nearer the Calvert County plantations along the Patuxent than those in his own county along the Severn. Furthermore, the recorded wills at Annapolis were copied after 1700 from older books and the clerk at that time could have failed to decipher correctly the old script. And it has already been shown that the name when attached to Mareen has appeared in official records as Dewall and Devall.
And there is no foundation for the widely circulated tale that the older children were all born in France. If they had been born out­side of Maryland and brought into the Province, landrights would have been proved and claimed for their transportation. Furthermore, no landrights were proved for a female bearing the name of Duvall or varied spellings who could have been a wife following her spouse to the Colonies.

Children of Mareen Duvall by Early Marriage or Marriages

1. John Duvall married Elizabeth Jones, q.v.
2. Mareen Duvall, born 1661, married Frances Stockett. q.v.
3. Lewis Duvall married Martha Ridgely. q.v.
4. Samuel Duvall, born 1667, married Elizabeth Ijams. q.v.
5. Eleanor Duvall married John Roberts, q.v.

Invisible factors point to the conclusion that his wife, Susannah, was none other than the third and Virginia-born daughter of his compatriot-in-exile, Benois Brasseur, and Marie his wife, one-time of The Clifts, Calvert County. All their daughters were unmarried on May 5, 1663, at the time Madame Brasseur made her will shortly before the pre-nuptial contract with Thomas Sterling who became her second husband. The original will is on file at Annapolis, and quoting from the instrument: "Also I give and bequeath to my daughter Susanna two heifers called and knowne by ye names of ffancy and Pye with their female increase at 16 years or marriage which ever first happens." In another part of the will, it was stated, that each daughter was to have a servant at sixteen or marriage.
Susannah received no portion of the landed estate, a medium by which, if she had inherited, one might prove or disprove her marriage. Of the five daughters, marriages have been proved for three, and it may be stated in this hypothesis that none has been proved or placed for Susannah. It is also rather an important point to consider that of the seven children of Susannah, each one, save Catherine who died after her first child, named a son Benjamin - and Benjamin became a stronger name in this Duvall-group that Mareen.* The family antiquarians in the past have estimated the ages of the second group as being younger than which is believed to be factual. The second marriage occurred about 1673 or 1674, and the only defi­nite birth year for this group is that of Mareen the Younger which occurred, according to disposition, in or about 1680.

Children of Mareen and Susannah Duvall

6. Susannah Duvall, born circa 1677, married Robert Tyler. q.v.
7. Mareen Duvall, born circa 1680, married Elizabeth Jacob, q.v.
8. Catherine Duvall married William Orrick. q.v.
9. Elizabeth Duvall married Abraham Clarke. q.v.
10. Mary Duvall married Henry Hall. q.v.
11. Johanna Duvall, born circa 1685, married Richard Poole. q.v.
12. Benjamin Duvall married Sophia Griffith, q.v.

His nuptial life with Mary ---, his last wife, was perhaps longer than it is generally believed, for Mary remained barren, either by choice or by God's will, (perhaps the former), with all three husbands. She was not Mistress Mary Stanton, as so many writers on the family have believed.
His first land patent was granted on January 1659/60, for 100 acres of land lying at the head of South River which he called "Laval," after ancestral associations in the Old World. The following is an excerpt from the original letters patent:4

Cecilius Absolute Lord and proprietary of the Province of Maryland and Avalon Lord Baron of Baltimore & . . . Know yee that for and in consideration that Marin Duvall performed his time of Service within this our Province and hath fifty acres more assigned unto him by Tobias Buttler, due to the said Buttler for performing his time of Service also . . . do hereby grant unto the said Marin Duvall a parcell of Land called Lavall lying on the west side of Chesa­peake Bay and on the west side of a river in the said bay called South river and on the Westernest branch of the said river near the head respecting the Land of John Ffreeman towards the north . . . containing and now laid out for One hundred Acres more or less. Together with all profits rights and benefits thereunto belonging (Royall Mines Excepted) To have and to hold the same unto him the said Maren Duvall his heirs and Assignes forever To be holden of us and our heirs as of our Manner of Baltemore in free and common Soccage by fealty only for all Services Yeilding and paying therefore Yearly unto us and our heirs at our receipt at Saint Maries at the two most usual feasts in the Year Vizt at the feast of the annunication of the blessed Virgin Mary and at the feast of St. Michaell the Archangell by even and equall portions the rent of Two Shillings Sterling in Silver or Gold or the full value thereof in such comodities as we and our heirs or such officer or officers appointed by us. . . Given at St Maries under our great Seal of our said province of Mary­land the two and twentieth day of January in the Eight and twentieth Year of our Dominion over the said province of Maryland. Anno qui Domi 1659. Wittness our trusty and well beloved Josias ffendall Esq. our Secretary of our said province."

It is not known whether he actually settled on "Lavall," if so, he soon removed to "Middle Plantation" nearer to the center of activities in South River Hundred. By 1678 "Lavall" had come into the posses­sion of George Parker, of Calvert County, who on September 9, 1678, with his son William Parker had it and adjoining vacant lands resurveyed into "Godwell." About 1707 "Godwell" was held by Richard Snowden.5
In 1664 by an assignment of 250 acres from John Ewen, 50 acres from Thomas Parsons, and 300 acres from Andrew Skinner, he as "Marin Dewall Carpenter"* applied for a patent of 600 acres which was surveyed under the name of "Middle Plantation." The following is an excerpt from the letters patent which indicate that his dwelling-plantation lacked a water front but may have had a minor outlet by water to the Patuxent through Cattaile Branch:6

" . . . do hereby grant unto him the Said Marin Dewall a parcell of Land called the Middle Plantation Lying in Ann Arundel County on the south side of South River in the woods between the Land formerly laid out for George Nettlefould, Ann Covill, George Puddington, and George Walker beginning at a Slooping White Oak standing in the line of George Nettlefould's Land . . . to a bound tree of Ann Covills Land . . . to a branch called Cattaile branch . . . to a marked oak near the line of George Puddington's and by puddingtons and Walkers Line unto the first marks Oak on the south by Nettlefould's Line Containing and now Laid out for Six hundred Acres more or less. . . . Given at St. Mary's under Our Great Seal of Our Said province of Maryland, this Sixteenth day of September in the three and thirtieth Year of our Province of Maryland . . . one Thousand Six hundred and Sixty four. Wittness Our Dear Son and heir Charles Calvert Esq., our Lieut Genl of our said Province of Maryland. Aprill the XVI th MCLXiiii." In 1665 Mareen Duvall and William Young jointly received letters patent to "Rich Neck," of 200 acres, which lay on the west side of Jacob's Creek adjoining the lands of Richard Cheyney and John Clark. One hundred acres of land had been assigned Duvall by George Puddington, while William Young had received his assignment from Ann Covill.
Later he added to "Middle Plantation," known as "Duvall's Ad­dition." The original survey reading as follows:

".... granted to Murrein Duvall of the County of Anne Arundel, Gent. . . . George Yate Deputy Surveyor under Jerome White, Esq., Surveyor General . . . laid out Duval's Addicon lying in the said County on the west side of South River about three miles from the said river beginning at a bounded White Oak of the land formerly laid out for the Duvall called Middle Plantacon adjoining the land of John Gray, Richard Arnoll, George Puddington, Gent . . ."

On March 23, 1677/8, for 4,000 lb. tob. he purchased from Thomas Bowdle, then of Calvert County, 375 acres or one-half of "Bowdle's Choice," the other half having been purchased by Robert Tyler, Sr., of Resurrection Manor. The tract bordered the west bank of the Patuxent River and adjoined the plantation of Demtrius Cartwright called "Essington."
On January 13, 1679/80, Marine Dewall, Planter, purchased from Robert Proctor, Innholder, and John Gater, Planter, "Morley's Grove" on a branch of the Patuxent River called Cattaile Branch and "Morley's Lot," a tract lying about three miles in the woods on the west side of South River, both tracts containing in all 770 acres. The tracts had been granted to Joseph Morley, of Anne Arundel County, Planter, who by his last will and testament devised them to Robert Proctor and John Gater (Gaither). Elizabeth Proctor and Mrs. Gaither waived dower.9
On June 12, 1683, "Mareen Devall, Merchant," purchased from John Larkin, of Anne Arundel County, Innholder, for 7,000 lbs. tob. "Howerton's Range," then lying in Calvert County (later Prince Georges) on the west side of the Patuxent River adjoining the land of Gabriel Parrott. The tract had been granted by patent on Septem­ber 1, 1670, to Thomas Howerton, of Calvert County, Planter, who conveyed it the next year to John Larkin, from whom Mareen Duvall purchased. The conveyance was witnessed by William Hopkins and Henry Hanslap before Thomas Taylor and William Burgess, two Justices of the Peace for Anne Arundel County, Katherine Larkin, wife to John, waived all dower rights.10
In some manner Murren Duvall in 1665 received 600 lbs. tob. from the levy of Talbott County.11 During an Indian uprising in 1681 a number of Englishmen, their retainers, and slaves were mortally wounded on the outpost settlements in South River Hundred. In order to prevent further devastations the High Sheriff called out the militia and issued special instructions to protect the dwelling houses of Mr. Duvall and Richard Snowden where the Indians had last been seen.12
About 1683 by his attorney, George Parker, Mareen Duvall sued Thomas Bowdle then of Talbot County in the Provincial Court over the sale of "Bowdle's Choice," alleging that Bowdle had not "kept the full covenant in the agreement" and as a consequence he had been damaged to the extent of 10,000 lb. tob. On March 16, 1683/4, the attorney of Thomas Bowdle appeared before the court and after all facts in the case were heard, the verdict was rendered in favor of the defendant. As a consequence, Bowdle recovered 2,259 lb. tob. from Mareen Duvall "for his cost and charge."12a
On October 11, 1687, Mareen Devall, Henry Ridgely, and Thomas Knighton appraised the estate of Colonel William Burgess, late of Anne Arundel County, deceased.13*
The General Assembly sitting in 1683 appointed Mr Marien Duvall with other leading subjects of Anne Arundel County on the com­mission for the "advancement of trade" and to lay out "ports & places where all Shipps & vessels tradeing into this Province shall unloade & putt on shoare & sell barter & Trafficke away all goods wares & comoditys that shall be imported into this Province . . . in the County of Ann Arundell att the Towne Land att Proctors & att South River on Coll Burges his Land & att Herring Creeke on the Towne Land."14
The following letter, written by Nicholas Greenberry who did not gain prominence until after the overthrow of the Proprietary Party by the insurgents, was written on July 25, 1692, to Sir Lionel Copley, the first Governor appointed by the King, and bespeaks the leaders of the Jacobites in the Province:15

"Sir I have been creditably informed lately of a great Cabal in our County held by the grand Leaders of the Jacobite Party (vizt) Col Coursey, Major Sayer, Col Darnall, Maj Dorsey, Richard Smith, Samuell Chew, and John Hinson, their Rendezvous was at Darnalls, Chews, Dorsey, and One Marien Duvals, but the Ocassion of meeting is not to be Known."

At Middle Plantation Mareen Duvall, undoubtedly the most eminent and best beloved Frenchman to have settled in Maryland, lived the patriarchal life of a seventeenth-century Maryland planter, merchant, and country gentleman surrounded by his family and servants. That he was fastidious in dress is brought out by the appraisem*nt at his death of his wearing apparel at £18/14/9 - but unfortunately for our information the articles of clothing were not separately enumerated. The silver plate consisted of 182 ounces, appraised at £46/5/2, a goodly sum in that day, but unlike most inventories of Maryland estates the appraisers were perhaps a little indolent and neglected to itemize each piece. As mentioned previously, no coat-of-arms was listed.
His dwelling conformed to the architectural conventions of the 17th century, small and compact as characteristic of colonial homes in that day, whose features were basically Jacobean with a few innova­tions which had crept into Provincial Maryland. His seat at Middle Plantation is definitely not standing today, but from the inventory of his personal estate at his death whereby the items were listed room by room, a conjectural picture can be formulated to show his many descendants today the home life of their ancestor.
There was the hall which served also as a sleeping quarters. This seems to have become characteristic of 17th century Maryland, the custom no doubt having developed from large families living in small houses, then again the bedstead in the hall could have been for the guest or stranger who could have been passing that way. Although the hall was usually the great room which served as both living and dining room, the hall at Middle Plantation did not serve as a ban­queting hall, for from the inventory it is learned that there were no provisions or articles necessary for the ceremonies of a feast.
The "chamber" at Middle Plantation served as both living and din­ing room and in it were ten Prussian leather chairs, certainly im­portations from Europe. There was also a looking glass - a coveted and luxurious possession in the 17th century Colonies.
In the south chamber on the ground floor which the master occupied as his sleeping quarters were a "large looking glass," the feather bed, and eight Prussian leather chairs.

There were only two sleeping chambers on the second floor - one for the older boys and the other for the girls and younger children. The large room over the living-dining room served the girls where there was "one child baskett" and the straw bed was no doubt for the nurse maid or mammy, for Mareen Duvall was one of the largest slave owners of his day, having eighteen in his retinue. The boys' quarters also served as a partial storage room for certain commodities, but the various condiments are believed to have been in sort-of a closet formed by the sloping roof as it came down to rest on the outer walls. Neither one of the upper chambers was heated.
The "midle Roome" on the ground floor was of only one story and contained the knives and forks and other articles used at dining and was certainly the so-called hyphen connecting the kitchen and the main portion of the house. And no doubt on the couch slept one of the master's slaves who served as a body guard for there were three guns listed.
Besides possessing Middle Plantation Mareen Duvall also maintained quarters at other plantations where no doubt were placed several of his negro families. There was the Patuxent Quarters well supplied with livestock and also the quarters in Prince Georges at the Great Marsh.
The Great Marsh which later became distinctive with a branch of Mareen the Younger was the plantation known as "Plaine" which had been patented by Robert Wilson, Gent., in 1670 and consisted of 300 acres on the west side of a branch of the Patuxent River "beginning at a bounded oake standing by a Great Marsh . . . running south . . . to a bound tree formerly laid out for John Howerton . . . to be holden of the Manner of Baltimore."
The "Plaine" did not come to Mareen Duvall in the shape of a dowry, for he purchased it, as proved by a suit over the boundaries of "Plaine" and "Howerton's Range" before the Provincial Court in September 1705. John Duvall, Gent., swore that when his father bought "Wilson's Plaine" of Robert Proctor, he was with his father and the bound tree between the two tracts was shown and pointed out to him and his father.
From a last will and testament we often learn the characteristics and temperament of our ancestors and much human interest, and in the will of Mareen Duvall there are tension, conflict, and apparent alienation of an older son. For these reasons, the will is given in its entirety to show not only his landed estate, but the manner in which he bestowed his wealth and affections.16
In his last illness he was administered by Dr. Mordecai Moore, and his death occurred about August 5, 1694. [His will was then reproduced, but due to space limitations, it is not quoted here].

He was buried presumably at his seat "Middleton Plantation," ac­cording to the customs of the 17th century, undoubtedly beside his wives and any infant children who failed to mature. The "grave­yards" on the old plantations were hallowed ground, but the one on Middle Plantation has apparently been plowed over and the tomb­stones crushed for road bed - the fate of so many of Maryland's relics at the hands of unappreciative owners.
In a letter dated August 1, 1841, to A. J. Duvall, Judge Duvall stated "[Mareen Duvall] resided in the neighborhood of the Governour's Bridge and South River. The ancestor was buried a few miles north eastward of the Governour's Bridge." A few miles is a considerable distance and quite indefinite in locating a specific spot. In consistency with the times he would have been buried at All Hallow's his parish church, or in the graveyard of his plantation. If he had been interred at the parish church, most likely Judge Duvall would had said All Hallow's. Everything therefore points to the fact that he lies in a now unmarked, neglected grave not far distant from the site of his mansion house upon Middle Plantation, which according to the survey did not border South River but was some distance inland.
The complete inventory of the personal estate of Mareen Duvall is given from the official records of the State, whereby to ensure a visualization of our ancestor's cultural home life and its furnishings and also that it might serve as a symbolic example of a typical 1781 century household of the southern colonial gentry. There was definite tension between the elder children and the young step-mother before his death which was quite evident when he devised his well beloved wife Mary Duvall the dwelling-plantation of 600 acres during her natural life and "she is not to be molested by any of my children." He likewise appointed his then wife sole executrix, but his sons John and Lewis and his son-in-law Robert Tyler were to "assist" her in the duties. At the probation the widow renounced all rights to the administration and it was duly recorded on August 13, 1694, under her signature.17
Within a month of the probation, that is, on September 18, Robert Tyler appeared at the Prerogative Court and renounced in writing all rights of executorship. It was likewise shown at that time the widow had previously refused to administer, therefore, "Letters Testamentary with copi of the will annexed was granted by the afsd Bonner [Henry Bonner Deputy Commissary for Anne Arundel County] unto John Duvall the Eldest Son of the said Deceased."18
Commissions were ultimately issued by the court for appraisem*nt of the personal estate and on February 14, 1694/5, John Duvall filed the returns showing a very affluent estate valued at £947/5/8 plus 81,302 lbs. of tob. "besides the tob hanging at ye plantations"* and 134 hogsheads ship (sic) for England.19
By March 4, 1694/5, Madame Duvall had fully realized the folly of hastiness in refusing to administer, so appeared at court and stated that she was named as executrix in the last will and testament of her dearly beloved husband, but letters had been granted to John Duvall "to the great Damage and prejudice of me." William Richardson Sr. whom she was perhaps encouraging as a prospective husband cham­pioned her cause and denounced Bonner declaring that "he had not given the widow time to accept or renounce."20
Ultimately, the widow won out. Her original administration bond, dated March 11, 1694/5, is extant at the Hall of Records at Annapolis and shows her signature as well as her bondsman and witnesses -- Richard Hill, Samuel Young, and her step-son, Lewis Duvall.
Robert Tyler in order to make his position clear and to absolve Judge Bonner from any unethical proceedings declared in writing "for diver good causes and consideration did renounce and absolutely re­fused to take upon me the executorship of my said deceased father-in-law." Dated 18 April 1694.21
In the neighborhood lived Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Ridgely, a widower and powerful figure politically in the Province, and at that time aged and not in the best of health. On February 28, 1695, he had addressed the Council and requested to be dismissed as Magistrate of the County "by Reason of being in years," being now unable to write his own name without difficulty.22 But before August 9, 1695, he had succumbed to the charms of the young Widow Duvall and had made her his wife, yet at the same time he was not in a position to allow the wealthy estate of Mareen Duvall be administered by a son, if it were possible for him to gain control.
On August 9, 1695, he had the High Sheriff issue citations against John Duvall and in some manner, no doubt through his political in­fluence, had the original letters revoked, and granted to him.23
John Duvall accordingly on August 29, filed his first account and among other disbursem*nts accounted for tobacco paid "Negro Doct for Phisick for the negroes . . . accomodacions for Elizabeth Duvall from 24 of Oct to 10 of March . . . dyet of 4 children . . ."24
Colonel Henry Ridgely refused to abide by the first appraisem*nt and demanded another to which the court agreed.25 It was not until February 1696/7, or 1 ½ years after John Duvall turned the admin­istration over to his step-father that "Henry Ridgely who inter­married with Mary the executrix of the estate of Mareen Duvall, late of Anne Arundel County, deceased," filed a brief account and showed disbursem*nts to Dr. Mordecai Moore. A second account was not filed by him until May 15, 1699, some five years after his death, at which time most of the £948 and many pounds of tobacco had vanished.28
Within a few years after the death of Mareen Duvall, Mareen the Younger petitioned the court to appoint his brother, John Duvall, his guardian as "his mother-in-law with whom he doth live do take little care for his proficiency in learning and lesser of his plantation for his future good."
Colonel Ridgely as remarked previously was a very powerful polit­ical figure in the Province at that time. Although he had received favors under the Calverts, when the rebels overthrew the Proprietary Government in 1689, he became a leader in the new Government. At court he denounced his step-son in no uncertain terms and asserted the many advantages he received through his guardianship. The court ordered him to return to his step-father's house with the threat of a thrashing by court authorities, if he ever protested again. The terrified orphan had already advised the court that he would have re­ported his plight sooner, but hesitated for fear of promised whippings by his step-father and step-mother.
In spite of "being of years" in 1695, Colonel Ridgely survived for 15 years, dying testate in 1710. He provided generously for his widow and besides devising her and her heirs his dwelling-plantation "Catton" he provided amply for an unborn child "wherewith my said wife now goeth," but in the event that the child was not born or died, his widow was to inherit.27*
The wealth of Colonel Henry Ridgely eclipsed that of Mareen Duvall. While the appraised value of the latter's personal estate was £947/5/8 plus 81,302 pounds of tobacco, that of Colonel Ridgely was £2,298/16/4 plus 5,167 pounds of tobacco* - but among the 32 negro slaves listed in his inventory were some who had formerly belonged to Mareen Duvall and which Ridgely had acquired by mar­riage with the widow.
The effects were appraised by Lewis Duvall and Robert Wheeler on October 16, 1710, and manifested amply the ease and wealth of the Maryland gentry of that period. His wearing apparel was valued at £68/16/6, and the silver plate at £94. No seal or coat-of-arms was listed. Among the items were at least 24 pictures, "a library of books," and 12 wax images in glass.
The inventory was taken room by room and displayed a ground plan, with a hall, middle room, porch, parlour, and kitchen, the latter presumably detached from the house. The second floor had a porch chamber, a parlour chamber, and a hall chamber. There was a cham­ber over the kitchen, and as there was a cellar and cellar room, it is assumed that it ran under the mansion house. One interesting feature was an "arbour in ye garden" with "a table and form a large new landskip."
The out houses were: ye store house; ye wash house; ye pantry; ye milk house; ye quarters; ye small house; ye hill house; ye barn; Mingo's quarters; and Dick's quarters.28 An additional inventory was returned on November 15, same year, appraised at £279/14/11, but a notation stated that "Lewis Duvall absented himself out of the Province before ye Invy Signed."29
With "Middle Plantation" and its 17th century luxuriousness and Colonel Ridgely's mansion house and plantation, the widow was out for still greater stakes. How long Madame Ridgely remained a widow it is not known, but before 1712 she had married the Rev. Jacob Henderson, a clergyman of the Anglican Church and rector of Queen Anne's Parish. He was born in or about 1684 and was thus junior to her by several years.
In the course of time he became the Commissary in Maryland of the Lord Bishop of London whose ecclesiastical jurisdiction included the colonial parishes in America. It was an office once offered to the Rev. Henry Hall who had married his wife's step-daughter, and in one sense the office could be compared to the present duties and pre­rogatives of a suffragan bishop. Henderson and Hall were not too compatible, and Henderson during his tenure of office as Commissary made several charges to the Bishop against Hall which, when analyzed, seem only to have had its inception from Hall's opposition to the Lord Proprietary. Henderson in politics was a member of the con­servative or Proprietary Party, whereas Hall was presumably aligned with the liberal or opposing party to the Lord Proprietary.
In addition to his clerical duties, the Rev. Mr. Henderson became a large land owner whose name figured in many land transactions. On March 6, 1717/8, he purchased from Hugh Ryley, of Prince Georges County, Planter, for £15 "Ryley's Hazars," of 175 acres, and on the same day he purchased of Charles Hyatt a 100-acre portion of "Tyler's Pasture."30
On September 8, 1718, he bought of William Moore "Piney Hedge," whose boundaries began at the head of a northeast branch of the Eastern Branch of the Potomac River. Mary Moore, wife, waived dower.31
He, with Robert Tyler, Thomas Clagett, Dr. Patrick Hepburn, James Haddock, and Joseph Belt, was made trustee for the public school of the county, and was deeded the ground on April 6, 1719, by Christopher Thompson, Prince Georges County, "in trust for the directing, governing, keeping, and encouraging a public school at Upper Marlborough in the Western Branch of the Patuxent River."32
On June 27, 1719, he purchased another portion of "Tyler's Pasture" from Charles Hyatt, at which time, Sarah Hyatt, waived dower. On July 15, 1724, he had a resurvey made on "The Grove" of 390 acres, "Ryles Hazard" of 175 acres, "Tyler's Pasture" of 100 acres, a portion of "Addition to Tyler's Pasture," and some vacant land nearby. In 1732 he received letters patent to "Pleasant's Grove," of 1,632 acres.
On July 4, 1726, he conveyed to John Raymond, of Prince Georges County, Carpenter, 100 acres of "Tyler's Pasture" for £30 which he had purchased from Charles Hyatt in 1719. Mary Henderson, his wife, waived dower.33 On March 4, 1726/7, Richard Duckett and Charity his wife redeemed a mortgage on "Duckett's Hope," it being a portion of "Tyler's Discovery."
On March 16, 1732, he recovered from Charles Carroll, of Annapolis, a portion of "Darnall's Grove" which had been the subject of a mort­gage and several conveyances. It was shown that Lewis Duvall "once of Anne Arundel County" purchased of Robert Tyler a 300-acre portion of "Martha's Choice'', it being a portion of "Darnall's Grove" which adjoined land owned by Colonel Henry Ridgely and Samuel Duvall. The said Lewis Duvall on October 6, 1706, mortgaged "Martha's Choice" to Robert Mitchell who by his attorney, John Battie, assigned the lien on April 2, 1711, to John Hyde, and the said Hyde on November 27, 1723, conveyed to Charles Carroll.34
On February 23, 1733/4, tne Rev. Mr. Henderson and "Mary his wife lately called Mary Ridgely the widow of Coll Henry Ridgely" deeded for £200 "The Glebe" or 400 acres which adjoined "Clarke's Forrest" and also a "Resurvey out of Darnall's Grove" to Benjamin Jacob.35 On April 2, 1734, Benjamin Jacob conveyed "The Glebe" of 400 acres to the Rev. Jacob Henderson, at which time Alice Jacob his wife waived dower.35
On February 24, 1734/5, he bought from James Beck for £10, presumably another portion of "Piney Hedge," having purchased a portion of "Piney Hedge" in 1718 from William Moore. On August 22, 1735, he leased "Martha's Choice," being a portion of "Darnall's Grove," to Mareen Duvall Sr., for certain rents.36
His wife, Mary, and one-time widow of Mareen Duvall, died in 1735/6, and was buried in the graveyard of Queen Anne's Parish. "Here lieth the body of Mary wife of Rev. Jacob Henderson who departed this life ye 19 January 1735."
On June 28, 1737, he conveyed to Dr. William Denune for £50 "Denune's Purchase," lying on the west side of the Patuxent River. On July 30, 1737, he conveyed to Dr. Denune a portion of "Parratt's Manor" which the said Jacob Henderson and Robert Tyler had pur­chased of Henry Hall on December 4, 1720. No wife waived dower at either conveyance.
About this time he was suffering from ill health, and on August 8, 1737, Governor Samuel Ogle officially granted him leave of absence to return to Europe.37 On December 29, 1738, from his English seat "Jacob Henderson late of Prince Georges in the Province of Maryland, Clerk, but now in the Kingdom of Great Britain" conveyed to James Macgill, of Anne Arundel County, Clerk, "Martha's Choice," a portion of "Darnall's Grove" but "now known as The Glebe which had been granted by Benjamin Jacob for 400 acres excepting thereout the four acres which have been heretofore laid out for the use of the Parish of Queen Anne in Prince Georges County aforesaid and on part thereof the Chappel of Ease Belonging to the said Parish is built."38 The Chapel of Ease is now the parish church of the Holy Trinity where many Duvalls are buried and which stands on "Martha's Choice" (Darnall's Grove), once the property of Lewis Duvall.
He was back in the Province by November 2, 1740, when he mar­ried Mary, the widow of Judge Robert Tyler, and who was the aunt of Daniel Stanton, of Philadelphia.
In 1744 a commission was appointed and authorized to take deposi­tions regarding the boundaries of the Glebe, then in dispute. The Rev. Jacob Henderson, aged nearly 60, stated that about 32 years ago, that is, in 1712, "Mrs. Henderson my former wife" pointed out a poplar which was the second tree of the Glebe. William Clark swore that about 40 years ago John Baptist Tyler, John Rody, and Richard Isaac showed him a Hickory and stated that it was the divid­ing line between Colonel Henry Ridgely, Lewis Duvall, and Baptist Tyler. William Clark, likewise, stated that 40 years ago Samuel Duvall Sr., then deceased, pointed out a red oak as the boundary of "Samuel's Choice." Samuel Duvall, of the Eastern Branch, aged nearly 37, stated that about 17 years ago Samuel Duvall Sr. showed him a tree in the line of "Martha's Choice" and "Mary's Delight." Other deponents were Richard Isaac aged about 66 and Alexander Falconar aged about 51.39
He died in 1751 during his incumbency as rector of Queen Anne Parish. He devised his wife during life all lands, that is, "Duckett's Hope" and "Jacob's Addition," his slaves, livestock, and other per­sonalty and also the interest of £1,900 (Irish value) given to the Incorporated Society in Dublin for promoting the English protestant schools in Ireland "which interest at 5 pennies I reserve to her after my decease by a deed, a copy whereof she has." He also bequeathed her £100 to be paid out of his estate.
To Robert Tyler, son of Robert Tyler "by my wife's niece" he devised the land willed to his widow during life, providing he gave to his sister, Mary Tyler, 200 acres of land. To Robert he gave the plantation "Ridge" which had been purchased of Joyce Gladstone and her daughter.
To Mrs. Elizabeth Denune, wife of Dr. William Denune, he be­queathed £30, and the like amount to John Duvall the Inspector. To his 6 nephews and 2 nieces, the children of Thomas Thompson by his sister, Mary, one shilling each, and to his half-brothers and 2 half-sisters living in Ireland, the sons and daughters of his mother by John Harrison, he willed one shilling each.
By a codicil he bequeathed the residue of his estate in England, Ireland, and elsewhere to his wife, and mentioned the "Incorporated Society of London for the Proprogation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts to Promote the Purposes of their Incorporation."
It was probated in Prince Georges County on October 26, 1751, by the oaths of James Beck, William Cover Jr., and Thomas Wells. The fourth and final account upon the estate was rendered on October 30, 1770, by Robert Tyler, showing £62/17/5 paid to Edward Pearson, Treasurer to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in foreign Parts, also an overpayment of £17/10/9.
The last will and testament of his widow was written on October 2, 1761, by James Beck and may be seen at Annapolis. She referred to her step-daughters (children of her former husband Robert Tyler) as daughters-in-law namely Mary Whitehead, Susannah Lamar, and Priscilla Wickham bequeathing each £25. To Mary Magruder, the wife of Jeremiah Magruder, she bequeathed £35 and some wearing apparel, and to Ruth Hall wife of Isaac Hall one suit of wearing ap­parel. Other bequests were £5 to Susannah Gray the wife of John Gray; £10 to John Duvall; £10 to Jeremiah Magruder; £5 to Margaret Hutton wife of Richard Hutton; 1 shilling to Robert Tyler son of her son-in-law Robert Tyler, deceased; 1 shilling to John Pindle son of Philip Pindle and the like amount to the latter's daughter Elizabeth Pindle. Twenty pounds were left for repairing the Vault at the Chapel and the residue of her estate was bequeathed to "Daniel Stanton son of my brother Stanton lately living in Philadelphia." John Duvall was appointed or named executor, and she signed as Mary N. Henderson in a very shaky hand. James Beck whose hand is identical with the script in the will was the first to sign, followed by Marsh Mareen Duvall, and Ann Baldwin who made her mark. It was proved at court on February 18, 1762.
She was laid away in the vault to which she had bequeathed money for its repair and which Judge Gabriel Duvall refers to as the vault at the Chapel, being a vault on the Epistle side of Holy Trinity near the chancel, but entered from the exterior of the church. Here was certainly buried the Rev. Jacob Henderson, the beloved rector, and where also had been buried in 1739 Mistress Martha Duvall, the spinster daughter of Judge Lewis Duvall.
There is a tale that one time the slab or entrance to the vault was loose and it became the hide out of a ferocious wild boar which at night loved to feast on human flesh. The story gained so much momentum that the negroes and simple white country folks would never go near the church. It created such unfavorable notoriety around the parish that a delegation of clergy unsealed the slab, entered the tomb to prove to the fearful ones that the wild boar no longer went on his nocturnal excursions or had perhaps gone to his reward.
Some 50 years after the death of the Rev. Mr. Henderson a lawsuit developed over some slaves formerly belonging to him who were claimed to have been free-born of white parentage. It was proved, however, that they had been sired by a white Irishman of a negro slave, so consequently all issue by law were declared to have been non-free born.
Benjamin Duvall, son of Mareen the Younger, in his youth had lived with the Rev. Mr. Henderson and during his 90th year made a deposition stating that in 1735 he was engaged to live in the family of the said Henderson and during that period he never knew or heard of any of Henderson's negroes being set free. . . . he knew all the negroes before they came into the possession of the said Henderson and that Easter mother of Gate belonged to his the Deponent's grand­father Mareen Duvall.40
At the same time or on June 9, 1800, Benjamin Duvall, aged 82, another grandson of Mareen the Emigrant stated that he knew the Rev. Jacob Henderson from the time he was a boy until Henderson died, that he married the widow of his grandfather and after her death he married the Widow Tyler. That he knew both of the wives of the Rev. Mr. Henderson and was acquainted with the family, and knew all the slaves and never knew of any white child in the home of the said Henderson.*

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http://cg.capitalgazette.com/news/eric-hartley-obama-s-arundel-ancestors/article_0881f296-eab1-59bf-aaa7-658db6b9a787.html

Eric Hartley: Obama's Arundel ancestors

By ERIC HARTLEY, The Capital

A historical marker on Route 424 in Gambrills notes the 600-acre plantation that once surrounded the spot was the home of Mareen Duvall and was later left to a "junior branch of the Duvall family."

Duvall, who died in 1694, also has a rather more famous descendant who now lives just 20 miles away: Barack Obama.

Genealogists say the president's mother, Stanley Ann Dunham, was a direct descendant of Duvall, who named his land in west county "Middle Plantation."

The fact that Obama - usually noted for being the first president of African descent - is also descended from Maryland slaveholders is remarkable, though not entirely surprising given his mixed-race parentage.

It also serves as an elegant rebuke to the wingnuts who still question Obama's very status as an American.

There's no such thing as being "more American" than anyone else, of course; there are no bonus points for longevity. But with ancestors in Maryland back to the 1650s, Obama certainly is no less American than anyone else descended from immigrants - which includes all of us except Native Americans.

His sprawling spider web of a family tree, indeed, is about as American as it comes. As has been reported, first lady Michelle Obama is a descendant of slaves. The president's father was from Kenya.

Obama's lineage was in the news this week as the Web site Ancestry.com (in a smart move garnering it lots of free publicity) said it had linked Obama to billionaire investor Warren Buffett, also descended from Duvall.

Obama and Buffett are "seventh cousins, three times removed," according to Ancestry.com, one of a number of increasingly popular Web sites millions of people use to track their heritage.

Around the president's, shall we say, ancestral home in west county are signs of what has changed since the 17th century - and what hasn't.

Much of the gently sloping land on both sides of Route 424 remains rural, including Marvin and Mildred Anderson's 200-acre farm, where they grow corn, soybeans and wheat.

However, just down Rossback Road sit a huge McMansion development on one side and a forthcoming development called Duvall's Grant on the other. (The original name, "Tall Cedars," was changed at the request of Duvall descendants, a family member told me.)

The megahomes, some of which have four-car garages (yes, four), are quite unlike the place Mareen Duvall likely lived. Despite the grand name "Middle Plantation," his home was probably a modest wooden "pole house," said Barrett McKown of Edgewater, the president of the Society of Mareen Duvall Descendants.

Marvin Anderson, 77, whose house is the closest to the Middle Plantation historical marker, heard about his ancestor's link to Obama a few years ago. But he seemed less than fascinated by it when I visited this week.

Anderson is something of a genealogy buff, but said he's more interested in his immediate family than distant links to famous people.

Just as much of the land in the area has not changed a great deal, some attitudes haven't, either.

When I asked what she thought of the Obama's link to her land, 78-year-old Mildred Anderson, who is white and has lived there all her life, said offhandedly, "I don't believe in interracial marriages."

That's a common attitude for people in her generation, but it seemed sadly ironic given the subject of Obama.

The former Mildred Bottner is not a Duvall descendant; her father bought the land in 1921. But by coincidence, she ended up marrying a Duvall descendant, of whom there are plenty.

McKown said the Society of Mareen Duvall Descendants has more than 400 dues-paying members. Famous descendants who were not members include the deceased - President Harry Truman, the duch*ess of Windsor and the wonderfully named King Zog of Albania - and the still living, like Oscar-winning actor Robert Duvall.

Mareen Duvall is believed to have had 23 children, 12 of whom lived to adulthood.

"The Duvalls, they had nothing to do except marry their cousins and have children," McKown said.

McKown first heard about the link when Obama was a senator. I asked what he thought when Obama was elected president.

"I wondered if he'd be interested in being a member of the society," McKown said with a chuckle. "But we've never written to him or asked him or anything."

The society meets once a year. About 75 people usually attend, and past gathering spots have included Shady Side, Annapolis, Oxford, Chestertown, Frederick and Croom.

"We're looking for a place for our meeting next year," McKown said. "The White House would be a nice place - nice big lawn where we could have it."

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Read Eric Hartley's "Arundel Outtakes" blog at www.hometownannapolis.com/blogs.

© 2014 CG.CapitalGazette.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Notes for ?:

Children of Mareen Duvall and ? are:
i. Capt. John Duvall, born in France?; died Apr 1711 in All Hollows Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD; married Elizabeth Jones.

Notes for Capt. John Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

CAPTAIN JOHN DUVALL, GENT.2
16... - 1711
AND
HIS DESCENDANTS

There is definite proof that John was the eldest son of Mareen Duvall the Emigrant, and if he were the John Duvall who was transported in 1678, then greater colour is added to the Duvall saga. He could have been a son begot of a marriage contracted in France, and being of a tender age at the time of his father's involvement in political affairs and subsequent banishment, they became separated and then there were the trying days of orphanhood. Owing to the exigencies of the times and the difficulty of contact, it was not until his late teens or early twenties that conditions were propitious for his joining his father in America.
The John Duvall of 1678 did not enter the Province as a redemptionist or an indenture, but he agreed merely with Captain John Dingley, of the Ship St. George of London, to be transported to Maryland free of passage money, though the transportees were supposed to per­form certain chores on shipboard en route, and for this contract Captain Dingley was to receive from the Lord Proprietary 50 acres of land. This landright or 50 acres for importing John Duvall, Dingley assigned along with 179 other landrights to Nicholas Painter. The latter was an associate of Colonel William Burgess who brought Mareen the Emigrant into the Province, and the fact that Painter at his death in 1684 devised the greater portion of his estate to the children of Colonel Burgess leans a belief that the last wife of Burgess could have been a kinswoman to Painter. Anyhow there is that Burgess-Painter tie-in involving Mareen Duvall the Emigrant and John Duvall the transportee of 1678.
About 1677 or before October 1678 the Nantico*ke Indian War broke out when a large contingent from Anne Arundel County went to the relief of the settlers on the lower Eastern Shore. Among those who served under Colonel William Burgess, the Commander-in-Chief of the punitive expedition, was Mareen the Elder, son of Mareen the Emigrant. It is noted particularly that John who was senior to Mareen did not participate in the campaign. Now John was the only son who was interested in the military - being a captain in the Provincial militia at a later date. So the question arises, why did not John who had the fighting blood join the forces against the Nantico*kes. It is particularly significant, because Captain Dingley did not bring his 180 settlers into Maryland until a short time before November 1678.

Then John had more of the continental flare or French customs than the other children of Mareen the Emigrant, with the lone ex­ception of Eleanor, and accepted the standards of the well-born French­man by the maintenance and recognition of a maitresse or sometimes referred to by a Frenchman as ma petite amis.
He married Elizabeth, daughter of Magistrate William Jones and Elizabeth his wife, a neighbor in South River Hundred. On August 17, 1685, his father-in-law, styled Planter, conveyed to him and Eliza­beth his wife for natural love and affections which were held for his daughter Elizabeth and her husband John Duvall, the plantation "Wil­son Grove" which lay in Anne Arundel County at the head of South River bound by the land called "Abington," formerly laid out for Robert Proctor and John Gater (Gaither). The tract of 200 acres had been granted by Lord Baltimore in 1672 to Robert Wilson, Gent., who conveyed to John and James Powell, both of South River, who likewise transferred the tract to William Jones. Elizabeth Jones, wife to William, waived all dower rights, before Henry Hanslap, High Sheriff for the county.1
On September 13, 1676, William Jones was commissioned one of the Gentleman Justices of Anne Arundel County.2 He died testate and was buried in All Hallow's Parish on June 11, 1705. By his will, dated May 31, 1705, and proved August 4, same year, he bequeathed personalty to his daughter Elizabeth Duvall "the wife of John Duvall" and to his granddaughter Mary Duvall. His widow, Elizabeth, who was devised the dwelling-plantation during life, married on June 25, 1706, James Sanders of All Hallow's Parish.3

Children of John and Elizabeth (Jones) Duvall

1. Elizabeth Duvall, born 1687, married Benjamin Warfield and John Gaither.*
2. Sarah Duvall, born 1689, married Samuel Farmer, q.v.
3. Mary Duvall, born 1692, married Edward Gaither.*
4. John Duvall, born Mar. 20, 1694/5, died young.
5. Mareen Duvall, twin, born and buried 1698/9
6. Mountillion Duvall, twin, born and buried l698/9
7. Comfort Duvall, born Mar. 17, 1700/1, married William Griffith.*
8. Lewis Duvall, born Jan. 16, 1703/4, married Eleanor Farmer, q.v.
9. Rachel Duvall, born Mar. 14, 1705/6, married William Waters* and Hen
Maroney. q.v.
10. Samuel Duvall, born June 22, 1708, married twice, q.v.
11. Alexander Duvall, born Aug. 17, 1710.

He became the most distinguished son of his father in the matter of public service, and in 1696 was listed as one of the military of­ficers of Anne Arundel County.4 In 1698 he was a member of the Grand Jury and in 1708 he advised the council relative to conditions emanating from the treason of Richard Clark, of Anne Arundel Coun­ty, which involved William Chew, of Baltimore County.5 On October 11, 1710, he petitioned the Grand Jury against excessive fees levied by the Provincial Court and the hardships of debtors during trial.
There is every reason to believe that Captain Duvall established his seat at "Wilson's Grove," the gift from his father-in-law, which lay between the head of South and Severn Rivers. Ultimately his landed estate consisted of several thousands of acres. In 1695 he patented "Duvall's Range" of 708 acres and "Duvall's Delight" of 1,000 acres. These patents were followed by "What You Will" of 373 acres in 1699, "Out Quarter" of 990 acres in 1701, "Lugg Ox" of 780 acres in 1702, and "Honest Man's Lott" with 100 ½ acres in 1704.
The Calvert Rent Rolls of about 1707 give a detailed account of his realty, with location, acquisition, and alienation:7

"Honest Man's Lott" of 110 ½ acres surveyed 12 October 1704 for John Duvall in ye North Branch at ye head of South River. Poss: John Duvall.
"What You Will" of 373 acres surveyed 2 October 1799 for John Duvall, lying above ye head of South River. Poss: John Duvall.
"Duvall's Range" of 708 acres surveyed 16 November 1694 for John Duvall in ye forks of Patuxent River. Poss: Heze Lincecumb.
"Wilson's Grove" of 200 acres surveyed 18 July 1671 for Robert Wilson between the heads of South and Severn Rivers. Poss: John Duvall.
"Burgess Choice" of 400 acres surveyed 19 December 1665 for William Burgess on ye south side of South River. Resurveyed for Benjamin Burgess and found to be 747 acres. Poss: 223 acres John Duvall for Hester Iiams; 25 acres Joseph Burton; 25 acres John Jacob; 67 acres Richard Iiams; 300 acres Richard Snowden; 143 acres Lewis Duvall; 67 acres Charles Cheney; 97 acres over survey.
"Duvall's Delight" 3,108 acres resurveyed 10 November 1704 for John Duvall, formerly surveyed for 1000 acres.
"Out Quarter" 990 acres surveyed 10 August 1701 for John Duvall on ye drafts of Deer Creek at a bound Hiccory of a tract of land called The Good Neighbor­hood. Assigned James Carroll by said John Duvall.

He gave the land on which the early parish Church of St. Barnabas stood, for on April 21, 1705, at the Vestry meeting the following appears on page 5 of the transcript at the Maryland Historical Society but the clerk inadverently recorded Mary instead of Elizabeth as the wife of Captain Duvall. "Also the same Day Came John Devall and Mary his wife before the vestry and acknowledged the two Acres of Land whereon St. Barnabas Church now stands be her Majesties Queen Anne's her heirs and successors for the use of the Parish."
His petition on behalf of debtors manifested his sympathy and warmth for mankind, and there was definitely much human interest in Captain John Duvall. While we do not know whether his connubial relations with his consort were happy or not, though there were 12 children, he seemed somehow to find solace with a maiden of the neighborhood by the name of Hester Ijams, of a respectable family and the sister of his brother's wife. She became the mother of his three love children - John who died young, Anne, and Elizabeth.*
On April 16, 1705, with the consent of his wife, Elizabeth, he con­veyed to Hester Iiams for good and valuable consideration the planta­tion "Burgess Choice," of 223 acres, adjoining the plantations of Richard Iiams, Lewis Duvall, and Joseph Burton, which had been bought of Benjamin Burgess, Mariner.8 The conveyance was for her natural life "her continuing Single or not happening to have any other Child or Children than is now living namely Anne and Elizabeth the children of the said Hester Iiams . . . should [she] marry or have any other child or children than is now living as aforesaid then I give grant and confirm the said land and premises and the goods and chatels and implements and household stuff to be equally divided between the said children of the said Hester Iiams share and share like, but if the children should die before 16 or marriage, then to the survivor." In­cluded also were three indentured servants - Richard Clarke, James Brotherton, and Josias Harrison. In the event that Hester died before the children obtained the age of 16, then he, John Duvall, obligated himself to their care.9
On February 9, 1708/9, he and his wife Elizabeth deeded to Amos Garrett, Merchant, for £20 "Honest Man's Lott," of 110 acres, lying on the north shore of South River beginning at a bound poplar stand­ing by a gate post which led from the house of Richard Wharfield to Mrs. Ruth Howard's door, and bordering on "Howard and Porter's Range." John Duvall signed the deed, while his wife made her mark before John Baldwin and John Brice, two Justices of the Peace.10
He died intestate and was buried from All Hallow's Church on April 20, 1711. Letters of administration were issued by the court to his widow and administratrix on June 15, 1711, with Benjamin Warfield and Mareen Duvall as her sureties to the value of £500."
The personal effects were inventoried room by room, that is, hall, inward room, chamber, and citekin (sic), manifesting a value of £88/3/-. On September 12, 1711, his widow filed an account and claimed a payment of £39/15/1 "to Micajah Perry & Co., on a decree they obtained against John Duvall in his lifetime."12
His relict after a widowhood of some 5 years married on April 24, 1716, Amos Simpson, a widower of All Hallow's Parish. Simpson became the guardian of the minor children and on or about June 29, 1721 petitioned the court to evaluate the landed estate of his ward, Lewis Duvall, the son and heir of John Duvall, deceased. The court accordingly appointed Henry Sewell and Peter Porter to make a fair and equitable valuation.13
__________
* Anne daughter of Hester Ijams was bapt. Mar. 25, 1706/7; Elizabeth born Aug. 15, 1703; and John Ijams bapt. Sept. 19, 1702. Ref: All Hallow's Register.

At the Assembly of April-May 1737, an act was passed whereby the entail on the tract "Wilson's Grove" was revoked and granted to the heirs of Lewis Duvall in fee simple. It stated that "John Duvall Dyed Intestate Leaving Issue three sons & four Doughters Viz: Lewis, Samuel, and Alexander Duvall, Elizabeth now the wife of John Gaither, Sarah now the wife of Samuel Farmer, Comfort now the wife of William Griffith, & Rachel now the wife of William Waters."14
__________
SOURCES: 1. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber 1H no. 1, folio 66; 2. Archives, vol. 15, p. 130; 3. Wills, Liber 3, folio 489; 4. Archives, vol. 20, p. 541; 5. Archives, vol. 25, p. 237; 6. Black Book no. 106; 7. Rent Rolls (A.A. Co.) pp. 34, 38, 43-5, 96, 98, Md. Hist. Soc.; 8. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber W T no. 2, pp. 243, 255; 9. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber W T no. 2, p. 271; 10. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber W T no. 2, p. 605; ii. Test. Proc., Liber 22, folio 12; 12. Inv. & Accts, Liber 320 folios 121, 151; 13. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber C W, folio 399; 14. Archives, vol. 40, pp. 87-89.

More About Capt. John Duvall:
Burial: All Hollows Church, Anne Arundel Co., MD

112 ii. Mareen Duvall the Elder, born Abt. 1661 in South River Hundred, Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Abt. 1734 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; married Frances Stockett Abt. 1685 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.
iii. Samuel Duvall, born Abt. 1667 in "Middle Plantation, " Ann Arundel Co., MD; died Abt. 1741 in Anne Arundel Co., MD?; married Elizabeth Ijams 16 Jul 1697; born Abt. 1671; died Bef. 1741.
iv. Eleanor Duvall, born Abt. 1670; died Aft. 1706; married (1) John Campbell; married (2) John Roberts Bef. 1694.

Notes for Eleanor Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

ELEANOR (DUVALL) ROBERTS2
16... - 17...

Eleanor Duvall, the eldest daughter of Mareen, was certainly an issue of the first wife and had married John Roberts before her father's death in 1694. Her legal husband was the son and heir of Andrew Roberts, a planter of Rhodes River, who dying testate in 1682 devised his son, John at the age of 21 his welling-plantation of 100 acres near Rhodes River and to his son, Henry, 200 acres near South River. Other heirs were his wife Jane and daughters Mary and Katherine. The witnesses were Katherine Larkin and Mary Farmer.1
Eleanor apparently had too much of the fire, temperament, and unconventionalities of the French and the fact that she was left only 5 shillings by the will of her father may indicate disapproval. Her marriage was incompatible and within six months she departed from her husband's bed and board and sought haven in Baltimore County. Presumably while living the life of une femme seule, and divorces being almost unknown in that day, John Campbell protected her. The inevitable happened.
After six years of separation, she may have been reconciled with her husband, but it was definitely stated that she "never returned to John Roberts her husband." Her husband, however, died intestate without disposing of his plantation on Rhodes River and a tract of 1,010 acres on Back River in Baltimore County.
After his death or on April 6, 1706, his brother and heir, Henry Roberts, petitioned the Council for the inheritance of his brother declaring that his brother left no legitimate issue. It was openly ad­mitted by the Council that several of them were well aware of the "notorious ill life and Conversation of the sd Ellinor Roberts" and the Council recommended that the bill or petition be considered by the Lower House.2 At that time Eleanor Roberts was still alive.
The petition came before the Lower House on April 3, 1707, and was thus endorsed by that body by which her issue was declared ille­gitimate.3
Eleanor's son, first known as John Campbell but later as John Roberts was undoubtedly the father of Mareen Roberts who died testate in Baltimore County in 1754. The latter devised his entire estate to his daughter, Anne Roberts. The witnesses were John Robords Sr., John Robords Jr. and Sutton Sicklemore Sr., all of whom, including the testate, made their X marks except Sicklemore.4

Note: The oft-repeated printed statement that Eleanor married Judge John Roberts, of Virginia, and left a brilliant and aristocratic issue is wholly unfounded.
__________
SOURCES: 1. Wills, Liber 2, folio 199; 2. Archives of Maryland, vol. 26, p. 529; 3. Archives of Maryland, vol. 27, p. 86-87; 4. Wills, Liber 29, folio 278.

226. Capt. Thomas Stockett III, born Bef. 02 Apr 1635 in County Kent, England; died Apr 1671 in "The Obligation," All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA. He was the son of 452. Thomas Stockett, Jr. and 453. Frances Ayleworth. He married 227. Mary Wells Bef. 1667.
227. Mary Wells, born 02 Jul 1643 in Norfolk Co., VA; died 21 Jan 1698 in Anne Arundel Co., MD. She was the daughter of 454. Dr. Richard Wells and 455. Frances Whyte?.

Notes for Capt. Thomas Stockett III:

http://www.timelesstreasure.net/stockett.htm
Stockett

Friction between King Charles I of England and England's Parliament resulted in a civil war from 1642-1646. The wars re-ignited between April and November of 1648. Some of the cause that led up to this unrest were from religious preferences, differences in opinions of alliances, lack of money from war, and other warring conflicts with other countries.

King Charles sent his family to France in January 1642. His wife, Henrietta Maria, was sister of King Louis XIII of France. On August 22, 1642, civil war broke out. The Parliamentary forces and the King's forces clashed, and families were divided by their loyalties. The result was the abolishment of the monarchy. King Charles I was tried, found guilty, and beheaded on January 30, 1649. England then became a dictatorship under Oliver Cromwell. In 1660, the people had had enough, and the government was overthrown. A new Parliament was elected, and the monarchy was restored under Prince Charles Stuart (King Charles II), son of Charles I.

It was at this time of England's unrest that we find the Stockett family in turmoil as well. They swore allegiance to Charles II. The following account is found concerning the Stocketts in "To Maryland From Overseas": "The elder of the four Stockett brothers who settled in Maryland after their exile in France with Charles II is listed in the "Visitation of Kent" which carried the lineage to an ancestor to the time of Elizabeth who served at her court as "Surveyor of the Works."

The Stocketts were of the Church of England, loyal to King Charles. After the King's defeat at Worcester in 1651, the Stockett brothers gathered what they could from the wreck of their property and came to Maryland. Four brothers, Lewis, Thomas, Francis, and Henry, sons of Thomas and Frances Aylworth Stockett came to the province and obtained grants for their portions of land.

They were in the public eye, all holding political positions in the new land. Dr. Francis Stockett was appointed Clerk for the Court of Baltimore in 1658. He was in the Assembly of Delegates at St. Marie's in 1658-59. Captain Thomas Stockett was in the Assembly from 1661-66. He was also a judge of the county courts until 1668, when he was appointed High Sheriff of Anne Arundel County. Lewis Stockett was commissioned in Baltimore County as Colonel and Commander-in-chief of all the forces of that county, from 1636-1667. Henry Stockett also served as a judge of the county courts.

The following is a quote taken from "Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties", spoken by Joseph Tilley, the Clerk of All Hallows Parish in Anne Arundel County:
"About or in ye year of ye Lord 1667 or 8, I became acquainted
with four gents ye were brothers, and then dwellers here in Maryland.
The elder of them went by the name Colonel Lewis Stockett: ye second
by the name of Captain Thomas Stockett ; ye third was Doctor
Francis Stockett, and ye fourth brother was Mr. Henry Stockett.
"These men were but newly seated or seating in Anne Arundel
County, and they had much business with Lord Baltimore, then ppetr
of ye Province.
"My house standing convenient, they were often entertained there.
"They told me they were Kentish men, or men of Kent, and yet
they were concerned for King Charles, ye First: were out of favor with
ye following government, they mortgaged a good estate to follow King
Charles, the Second, in his exile, and at their return, they had not money
to redeem their mortgage, which was ye cause of their coming hither.--
(Signed.) JOSEPH TILLY."

Captain Thomas Stockett married Mary Wells, daughter of Richard Wells, who was prominent in the Puritan colony of Virginia. Richard Wells was one of the commissioners appointed as representative of Parliament in 1654. He was also a Justice of the Peace, and owned a sizeable estate.

Captain Thomas and Mary had one son, Thomas, and four daughters. After the death of the Captain in 1671, Mary remarried George Yate. References to Captain Thomas Stockett can be found in various records located at the Maryland Archives. *

"Thomas Stockett emigrated to Maryland with his brothers and settled at the head of Chesapeake Bay, certainly at that time the outposts of the Province. According to a Treaty of Peace begun at Spes Utia on May 16, 1661, it was agreed that the Susquehanna Indians should apply at the house of Captain Thomas Stockett for "ticketts" to pass "further among the English Plantacons" and that the Susquehannas should deliver all runaways to Captain Thomas Stockett. At this time he was addressed as Captain and there is every reason to believe that his commission as a military officer had been granted by the Lord Proprietary."

"For over a hundred years or more the descendants of Captain Thomas Stockett were centered around 'The Obligation' in All Hallow's Parish and to a lesser extent around 'Doden' another plantation of the South River area."

Sources: Anne Arundel Gentry, Vol. 2; Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties; Maryland From Overseas; British Roots of Maryland Families; a book on the history of England

Biographical Sketches

picture: Anna Leone Knapp

********************************************

The following Internet article, "The City of Havre de Grace, MD," credits Captain Thomas Stockett as the founder of Havre de Grace. This article is pasted below:

http://www.virtualharford.com/havredegrace.htm (date of copy: September 18, 2002)

History
Havre de Grace rose to prosperity as a mercantile center in the mid-1800s, due in large part to the town's location at the convergence of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay. By 1836 a railroad, canal and steamship line saved the city. From 1839 to the early 1900s, mule-drawn barges carried coal, lumber, grains. and iron products between Havre de Grace and Wrightsville, PA, 45 miles upstream.

Few buildings survived the British torch in the War of 1812. Many examples of the architectural styles favored by wealthy 19th-century merchants have been retained however, and now serve as offices and homes. The old lock house besides the defunct Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal has been restored as a museum. The Concord Lighthouse is among the oldest lighthouses in continuous operation on the East Coast

Recreational activities and special events center primarily on the water.1

At the head of the Chesapeake Bay lies a small island originally called Palmer's Island, named from its owner, Edward Palmer, who received it by grant from the Virginia Company about 1622. Palmer established a fur trading post and had visionary dreams of founding a university. It is probable that the settlement on this island influenced the location of the town of Havre de Grace.

On July 19, 1658, some of the land, which is now Havre de Grace was assigned by the Lord Proprietor of Maryland to Godfrey Harmer and earliest records, refer to it as "Harmer's Town".

On June 30,1659, the land was reassigned to Thomas Stockett to whom credit is given for the real beginning of this important center. One of the first permanent settlers was Captain Stockett. The town then became known as "Stockett's Town". It is interesting to note that in the treaty made with the Indians at Spesutia Island on May 16, 1661, at the home of Nathaniel Utie, mention is made of Captain Stockett's house in the following clause: "That for prevention of mischief that too often happens by misunderstanding and not distinguishing Sasqusahannoughs from other Indians, the Sasqusahannoughs shall not come ordinarily to any other house but the house of Captain Thomas Stockett or of Jacob Clauson from whence they shall have tickets if they have occasion come further among English plantations."

For almost thirty years the settlement grew slowly and on August 13, 1688, the site was transferred by deed from Thomas Stockett, Jr., son and heir of Thomas Stockett to Jacob Looten of Cecil County, a fur trader of Dutch descent. The deed describes it as "all that plantation situate and laying on the west side of a river called Susquehanna in the county of Baltimore at the mount of said river called Point Conquest formerly belonging to Thomas Stockett."

The present Point Concord is no doubt a corruption of the original name of Point Conquest.

A ferry for crossing the river became a necessity, as the town was strategically located on a route between the North and South. Individual boat and scow owners engaged in an unsatisfactory ferry service with great competition and with no control by law. In 1695 the General Assembly granted permission to Jacob Young and William York to establish a ferry and provide for ordinaries or inns on each side of the river. The first legalized ferry with approved toll rates was put into effect in October of that year.

Soon after 1700 the town became known as the "Susquehanna Lower Ferry." This name was to distinguish it from the Upper Ferry, which was located just south of Lapidum.

In 1714 the site of Havre de Grace again changed hands, when it was purchased by John Stokes. Through succeeding years the lots became privately owned so that by 1773 the town had a population of approximately 200 people.

Conflicting stories are told of the manner in which the name of the town was changed from Susquehanna Lower Ferry to Havre de Grace. The story usually accepted as true is that its name was suggested by the French Army Officer, Lafayette, who played a large part in the American Revolution. After the close of the war, Lafayette returned to American in 1782 for a visit to General Washington. As a guest, he journeyed from Mount Vernon to Philadelphia to attend a meeting of the Continental Congress and traveled by the Old Post Road through Harford County. When he viewed the river and the bay, with the little town nestled on the flats a their junction, he was impressed by its beauty and its resemblance to Le Havre de Grace in France. He is said to have exclaimed, "C'st le Havre" The expression was immediately accepted and the beautiful name of Havre de Grace was designated the city since that day.

By 1785 the community had grown to be a sizable town and the people desired more local government. By an Act of the General Assembly in that year it was incorporated as town with a commission from of Government.

In 1810 a report was made showing $713 in the treasury. A resolution was passed authorizing the use of this money for building a market house with the proviso that any surplus money be used for constructing a schoolhouse. This is probably the first mention of public education and small sum indicates that education at that time was largely regarded as a private rather than a public obligation.

On October 12, 1812, an ordnance was passed forbidding the discharge of firearms within the town under penalty of fifty cents for each offense. The prohibition did not apply to the shooting of ducks or other wild fowl "sitting on or flying over the waters in front of the shores of the town."

By 1882 the General Assembly decided that the welfare of the citizens could be taken care of by a more modern form of government than the commission system, and Havre de Grace was incorporated as a city with a mayor and city council elected every four years by vote of the people. This form of government as continued since that date. 2

Havre de Grace has had a post office in continuous operation since 1789, the oldest in the county. Before this date the post office was known as Susquehanna (1777-1789). Its location on a bay, a river, along 2 main highways and 2 railroads are reasons why it has existed and prospered nearly 200 years. Numerous industries, businesses, a hospital and a marina support the towns economy. Hand stamped and manuscript postmarks were used in the stamp less period. Since then various types of circular date stamps have been in use. Discontinued post offices now served by Havre de Grace include Lapidum, Webster, Garland, Earlton, Chapel, Level and Hopewell Cross Roads. 3
-----------------

1 AAA Mid-Atlantic Tour Book by AAA Publishing 1998
2 Our Harford Heritage by C. Million Wright, published 1967
3 History of Post Offices of Harford County, Maryland by Frank M. Stewart 1991

http://www.mhgp.org/anne%20arun%2007.html
Maryland House & Garden Pilgrimage

2. OBLIGATION. The land on which this late 17th century house stands was granted in 1671 by Charles Calvert to Thomas Stockett who emigrated to Maryland in 1658. Named "The Obligation" in the 1671 document, the name may refer to repayment for the loss of the Stockett family property in Kent, England. This royalist family supported Charles II during his exile during the Cromwell era in England. The property remained in the Stockett family for more than 275 years and was purchased by the current owner's family in 1946, thus being only the second family to own the property in its 335 year history. The house was originally one and a half stories with four chimneys. It was later raised to three stories and the chimneys brought together. All interior walls are brick with plaster applied directly to the brick. There is a unique wooden lock on the south door, a 17th century box-type stairway, and an unusual corner fireplace.

More About Capt. Thomas Stockett III:
Appointed/Elected 1: Magistrate for Baltimore Co., MD, Gentleman of the Quorum (1661); represented Baltimore County in the General Assembly at St. Mary's City (1661-64); High Sheriff of Anne Arundel County (1665-death); Burgess for Anne Arundel (1668); Deputy Surveyor of AA Co
Appointed/Elected 2: 1670, After Jerome Whyte commissioned him Deputy Surveyor of Anne Arundel County, he became Acting Surveyor General of the Province of Maryland when Whyte went to England in 1670.
Comment: Abt. 1658, The English author, George Alsop, came to Maryland and served two years as an indentured servant to Thomas Stockett when they were in Baltimore County. Alsop then returned to England and wrote a book on Maryland, one of the earliest advertising attempts.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Anglican--joined All Hallows Parish upon moving to Anne Arundel Co., MD.
Event: 16 May 1661, A Treaty of Peace was begun at Spes Utia in which Indians had to apply at Capt. Thomas Stockett's for tickets to pass to the English plantations. The Susquehannas also had to give all runaways to him.
Immigration: Bef. 1661, Immigrated to Maryland with his brothers, originally settling at the head of the Chesapeake Bay at present-day Havre de Grace, MD, where the Susquehanna River ends and Chesapeake Bay begins.
Military: Was a Captain of Militia and High Sheriff. In 1667 was ordered to raise 25 barrels of corn and 3800 weight of meat out of the county when a militia was raised to march against the Indians.
Probate: 03 May 1671, Anne Arundel Co., MD
Property: Was granted "The Obligation" in All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD, in 1671 by Cecilius, 2nd Baron Baltimore, 663 acres. His descendants were centered there and on the "Doden" plantation. Stockett Run flows through this area and into Patuxent River.
Residence: County Kent, England; present-day Havre de Grace, MD; "The Obligation, " on Stockett's Run, South River Hundred, Anne Arundel Co., MD after 1665.
Will: 23 Apr 1671, Anne Arundel Co., MD

More About Mary Wells:
Burial: All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD
Ethnicity/Relig.: Originally of Puritan background, but converted to the Anglican Church after marriage, joining All Hallow's Parish in Anne Arundel Co., MD.

Children of Thomas Stockett and Mary Wells are:
113 i. Frances Stockett, born in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died in Anne Arundel Co., MD; married Mareen Duvall the Elder Abt. 1685 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.
ii. Mary Stockett, married Mark Richardson.
iii. Thomas Stockett, Jr., born 17 Apr 1667 in South River Hundred, Anne Arundel Co., MD; died 1732 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; married (1) Mary Sprigg 12 Mar 1690 in All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD; died 27 Jan 1694; married (2) Damaris Welsh 09 Apr 1700.

More About Thomas Stockett, Jr.:
Burial: All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD
Probate: 08 Dec 1732, Anne Arundel Co., MD
Property: Following his mother's death in 1699, he inherited his father's landed estate and "The Range" that his stepfather will to his mother. Owned part of "Vale of Benjamin" and "The Obligation, " Anne Arundel Co., MD.
Will: 13 Oct 1732, Anne Arundel Co., MD

236. Robert Skinner, born in possibly Herefordshire, England; died Abt. 1686 in Calvert Co., Maryland USA. He married 237. Ann Storer Aft. 1672.
237. Ann Storer, born Abt. 1638 in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died Abt. 1714 in "The Reserve, " near present-day Prince Frederick, Calvert County, Maryland USA. She was the daughter of 474. Edward Storer, Jr. and 475. Mary Widmerpole.

Notes for Ann Storer:
Below is a Medieval Genealogy posting by John Brandon after I sent him the article by Judge James Duvall Trabue on the royal ancestry of Ann Storer Truman Skinner, which was published before Mr. Brandon discovered that this ancestry might be invalid due to the probability that Ann was the daughter of Edward Storer by his first marriage to Mary Widmerpole rather than his second marriage to Katherine Babington:

: John Brandon - afficher le profil
Date : Sam 21 oct 2006 20:45
E-mail : "John Brandon"
Groupes : soc.genealogy.medieval

Bryan Godfrey has kindly provided me with a copy of Judge James D.
Trabue's article on the Storers from TAG 79:13-27, "Ann and Arthur
Storer of Calvert County, Maryland, Friends of Sir Isaac Newton: With
the Descendants of Clarke Skinner of Calvert County." This article
provides the following vital stats for Ann (Storer) (Truman) Skinner:
born ca. 1642; died between 30 July 1713 and 19 June 1714 (dates of
writing and probate of her will); married (1) Dr. James Truman (who d.
7 Aug. 1672); married (2) Robert Skinner (who d. Nov. 1686). A
footnote attached to her date of death notes: "Her tombstone is cited
showing her death on 3 Aug. 1717, at the age of about 75. The dates of
her will, however, indicate an error with regard to the engraving or
transcription of the date on the tombstone." Oddly, despite this
cautionary statement, the calculated date of birth ("ca. 1642") still
corresponds to a death in 1717. She is given the following children:

(by first husband, James Truman):

--Martha Truman, b. England ca. 1658; married Thomas Greenfield
--Ann Truman, d. Aug. 1727; married (1) William Head; married (2) John
Bigger; married (3) Patrick Andrew
--Mary Truman, d. ca. 1799 [sic]; married Thomas Hollyday
--Elizabeth Truman, married Charles Greene

(by second husband, Robert Skinner)

--Clarke Skinner
--William Skinner
--Adderton Skinner

Judge Trabue provides a transcription of the will of Arthur Storer of
Maryland, the significant points being ...

--"I Arthur Storer of Calvert County in the Province of Maryland
Mer'cht Being sick & weake of body, but of perfect mind and memory
praised be god"
--"I give and bequeath unto Joseph Clarke Appothecary in Lough-Borough
in Leicester Shire" [Joseph being his half-brother]
--"I give and bequeath unto my Brother Edward Storer & my sister
Katherine"
--*I give unto my Deare Mother Katherine Clarke ... Also I give unto
my Brother Edward Storer my Universall Double Ring Dyall*
--"I give and bequeath unto my coz. Mary Hollyday"
--"and for all the Rest of my worldly goods and Debts I give and
bequeath unto my sister Anne Skinner Widow and my coz. Martha
Greenfield making and consituteing the sd Anne Skinner and Martha
Greenfield Executrixes of this my last will & Testament."

There is a footnote explicating the reference to "my sister Katherine
"Katherine is spelled with either a "K" or a "C" in the records. He
does not give her surname. Katherine Storer had m. (1) ___ Bacon and
(2) ___ Vincent (Will of Humphrey Babington, PCC 21 Fane)." This
implies, to me at least, that Katherine Storer and her Bacon and
Vincent husbands are mentioned in the will of Humphrey Babington (a
brother of Katherine [Babington] [Storer] Clarke). Yet, oddly, when
Judge Trabue discusses the will of Humphrey Babington on the following
page, he says only:

Although [Humphrey] Babington made his will in August 1686, he did not
die until 1691. Katherine Clarke [his sister] was one of his executors
and there were numerous bequests to relatives in England, including to
his nephew Edward Storer, as well as a bequest to his nephew Arthur
Storer (who was then in America). Edward is described as being "of
Buckminster."

So there is no mention of Arthur's sister Katherine Storer in this
particular section.

We can construct a timeline of the life of Edward Storer the father
that highlights a problem: his marriage to Katherine Babbington was
not long enough to permit the birth of a daughter Ann, if a daughter
Katherine has to be included as well:

1. Edward Storer, Sr., married Mary Widmerpole, 31 Oct. 1637 at
Wysall, Nottinghamshire [from extracted IGI].

2. Marriage license dated 15 Feb. 1640/1 is issued: "Edward Storer,
p[arish of] St. Peter's Nott[ingha]m, gent., & Katherine Babbington,
of Bunney, sp[inste]r" [Trabue, p. 16, note 23, citing Thomas Mathews
Blagg and F. Arthur Wadsworth, eds., _Abstracts of Nottinghamshire
Marriage Licenses, Archdeaconry Court, 1577-1700; Peculiar of
Southwell, 1588-1754_, Index Library, 58 (London, 1930): 189].

3. Edward Storer, son of Edward, Sr., and Katherine, baptized at
Bunny, Notts., 7 Feb. 1641/2 [Trabue, p. 15, note 17, citing Bunny,
Nottinghamshire, Bishops' Transcripts (FHL film #503,480)].

4. Edward Storer, Sr., dies in June 1644, is buried 10 June 1644 at
Buckminster, Leicestershire [Trabue, p. 17, citing Buckminster,
Leicestershire, parish register (Leicester Public Records Office, fiche
1)].

5. Edward's posthumous son Arthur Storer baptized 20 Feb. 1644/5 at
Buckminster, Leics. [Trabue, p. 15, note 19, citing parish register of
Buckminster, Leics., microfiche 1, Leicester Public Records Office].

6. Widow Katherine (Babington) Storer marries, second, William Clarke,
apothecary, on 18 July 1647 at Buckminster, Leics. [Trabue, p. 17,
citing Buckminster, Leicestershire, parish register (Leicester Public
Records Office, fiche 1)]. By her second marriage, Katherine had at
least three children-- Joseph, John, and Martha Clarke.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I suspect that only one child (the
daughter Katherine) could have been born between Edward, Jr., in Feb.
1642, and Arthur, in Feb. 1645 (unless Katherine and Ann were twins!
Hmmm, the mind brightens with a new idea ...). Judge Trabue notes
that, "[u]nfortunately, there is a gap in the records of Bunny between
1642 and 1662, so the baptisms of the two daughters cannot be found."
Yet he certainly was aware that the family had removed to Buckminster,
Leics., sometime in this same period, and makes no mention of a similar
search in the Buckminster records (yet, surely, any such baptism of a
daughter [or daughters] at Buckminster would have been mentioned if
found).

Douglas Richardson recently provided us with the full transcription of
widow Ann Skinner's gravestone: "Here lyeth Mrs. Ann Skinner first
Relict of James Truman Gent, afterwards of Robert Skinner, who died 3
of August 1717 aged about 75 years having lived near half the time a
Widow." If she died in August 1713, aged 75, this yields a birth-year
of 1638. Bryan Godfrey noted to me that he had seen another
transcription of the stone giving the age at death as 73 years. This
still yields a birth-year of 1640, early enough to have been prior to
the issuance of the Feb. 1641 Babington-Storer marriage license. Given
that Ann (Storer) (Truman) Skinner had no daughter called "Katherine,"
and was apparently left out of the will of Humphrey Babington (despite
her sister Katherine [Storer] [Bacon] Vincent's being mentioned), it
seems to me that she must have been only a half-sister to Arthur
Storer, born of their father's first marriage to Mary Widmerpole. As
Ann was probably raised in the household of her stepmother's second
husband, William Clarke, this may explain the naming of her son
"Clarke" Skinner, without necessarily implying a blood relationship.

Below I've provided a transcription of the 1662/64 Notts. Visitation
entry for Widmerpole, as well as some extracted IGI entries that apply:

Sir William Dugdale, _The Visitation of Nottinghamshire Begun in 1662
and Finished in 1664_, ed. G. D. Squibb (London: Harleian Society, 1986
[new series, vol. 5]), p. 115:

[Husband:]
George Widmerpole of Widmerpole in Com. Nott., died circa ann. 1628

[Wife:]

Jane daughter to Fermyn Russell of Toucester in Com. North'ton

[Sons:]
1. Thomas Widmerpole died unmarried
2. Joseph Widmerpole of Widmerpole died in June ann. 1660 sine prole
3. George Widmerpole Citizen of London, aet. 57 ann. ... Julij, 1663
[wives: Martha Simpson and Margaret Holles]
4. Nicholas Widmerpole, Citizen of London [wives: Elizabeth Nurse,
Elizabeth Smith, and Elizabeth Dobs]

[Daughters:]

1. Margaret wife to George Linacre of Plumley in Com. Derb.
2. Anne wife to Edw. Burley of Haslam in Com. Ebor. after to ...
Taylor of Haslam
3. Mary wife to Edw. Storer of Buckminster in Com. Leic.
4. Jane wife to John Daniel of Long Sutton in com. Linc.

... from the IGI:

Wysall, Nottinghamshire

--Georgius Linacre to Margareta Widmerpole, 30 Dec. 1627
--John Daniel to Jane Widmerpole, 3 Oct. 1637
--Edward Storer to Marie Widmerpoole, 31 Oct. 1637

Muston, Leicestershire

--James Truman to Sarah Watson, 12 June 1656
--Elizabeth Truman, daughter of James and Anne, bapt. 1 May 1660, died
19 Nov. 1660
--Martha Truman, daughter of James and Anne, bapt. 9 Jan. 1662
--Anne Truman, daughter of James and Anne, bapt. 16 March 1664

Grantham, co. Lincoln

--John "Vincet" to Katherine "Bakon," 7 July 1685

****************************************************
Below is a later remark by Mr. Brandon:

Update on Anne (Storer) (Truman) Skinner

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: "John Brandon"
Date: 23 Mar 2007 07:30:42 -0700

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I've recently received a couple of emails from a lady named Jennifer
in Alabama on this topic (unfortunately I deleted them both in a large
block of old email; maybe she'll respond to this posting). Anyway,
the substance of her messages was that she had transcribed the 1642
will of Jane (Russell) Widmerpole, mother of Mary Widmerpole who was
one of the wives of Edward Storer of Buckminster. (See this page for
more background:

http://groups.google.com/group/soc.genealogy.medieval/msg/f66873f31f0c36d0?dmode=source&hl=en

Jane Widmerpole's will mentioned some children and grandchildren, but
there was no mention of a Mary Storer or any Storer grandchildren.

This could in fact be good news, meaning that the daughter Anne was a
child of Katherine Babbington. We *could* revise the chronology thus:

1. Marriage license dated 15 Feb. 1640/1 is issued: "Edward Storer,
p[arish of] St. Peter's Nott[ingha]m, gent., & Katherine Babbington,
of Bunney, sp[inste]r" [Trabue, p. 16, note 23, citing Thomas Mathews
Blagg and F. Arthur Wadsworth, eds., _Abstracts of Nottinghamshire
Marriage Licenses, Archdeaconry Court, 1577-1700; Peculiar of
Southwell, 1588-1754_, Index Library, 58 (London, 1930): 189].

2. Edward Storer, son of Edward, Sr., and Katherine, baptized at
Bunny, Notts., 7 Feb. 1641/2 [Trabue, p. 15, note 17, citing Bunny,
Nottinghamshire, Bishops' Transcripts (FHL film #503,480)].

3. POSSIBLE birth/baptism of Anne Storer, dau. of Edward, Sr., and
Katherine, in Jan./Feb. 1642/3.

4. POSSIBLE birth/baptism of Katherine Storer, dau. of Edward, Sr.,
and Katherine, in Jan./Feb. 1643/4.

5. Edward Storer, Sr., dies in June 1644, is buried 10 June 1644 at
Buckminster, Leicestershire [Trabue, p. 17, citing Buckminster,
Leicestershire, parish register (Leicester Public Records Office,
fiche 1)].

6. Edward's posthumous son Arthur Storer baptized 20 Feb. 1644/5 at
Buckminster, Leics. [Trabue, p. 15, note 19, citing parish register of
Buckminster, Leics., microfiche 1, Leicester Public Records Office].

Note that this means, literally, that Katherine had four children in
four years (we know this can happen--witness Queen Charlotte and
probably Mrs. Lucy Quinby Bromfield, among others). If Katherine and
Anne were twins this could ease the chronology significantly. Yet it
would also make odder the fact that Humphrey Babbington's will
mentions niece Katherine Bacon, but not niece Anne Skinner.

I'll also quote a couple sentences from my earlier posting:

"If she [Anne S.T. Skinner] died in August 1713, aged 75, this yields
a birth-year of 1638. Bryan Godfrey noted to me that he had seen
another transcription of the stone giving the age at death as 73
years. This still yields a birth-year of 1640, early enough to have
been prior to the issuance of the Feb. 1641 Babington-Storer marriage
license."

A third possibility is that Mary Widmerpole died (in childbirth?)
shortly after her marriage (say by August 1638). This leaves space
for yet another marriage by Mr. Edward Storer prior to his (? possible
third) marriage to Katherine Babbington. The second wife, who would
have to die by late 1640, could have been the mother of Anne.

More About Ann Storer:
Burial: Grave was discovered on the old Basil Duke farm on Dare's Beach Road 2 miles from Prince Frederick, MD. This is now the site of Calvert High School, and her gravestone was later moved nearby to the farm of a descendant, Mrs. Ann Vaughan.
Probate: 19 Jun 1714, Calvert Co., MD
Will: 30 Jul 1713, Calvert Co., MD

Children of Robert Skinner and Ann Storer are:
i. Dr. William Skinner, died 1738 in Calvert Co., MD; married Elizabeth Mackall; born Abt. 1665.
118 ii. Clarke Skinner, born Bef. 1677; died Abt. 1714 in Calvert Co., MD; married Ann ?.
iii. Maj. Adderton Skinner, born Abt. 1677; died Abt. 1756 in Calvert Co., MD; married (1) Priscilla Skinner; married (2) Rebecca Brooke?; died Abt. 1760.

Generation No. 9

388. Richard Daux, born Abt. 1590 in London, England; died Aft. 1658 in London, England.

Notes for Richard Daux:
The following has been copied and pasted from the Burgess Family and Relatives: Daux Family website, http://www.surnames.com/gedcom/burgess_jim/i0000457.htm#i457

1. Richard1 Daux was born in Of London, , England about 1590.

He married an unknown person. Public Record Office in London, England under the designation 244/24. A transliteration of this document was done by Richard Dieterle descendant of Richard Daux. H/W Vol III, No. 1, 1980. "Witt/Harbour Ancestor cleared of Wrong/Doing" A charge was filed against Richard Daux of Stratford-on-Avon as one of 13 persons plus "divers other riotouse and disorderly persons in the number of thirtye" who served a warrant on one William G. Perrye issued by "the right honorable Sir Edward Cooke knight Chiefe Justice." While details of what took place are not clear. Richard Daux was cleared of any wrong doing, and remained an honorable person. He later moved to London where he was living when his son WALTER DAUX died (1658) in Charles County, Virginia.

Richard Daux had the following child:

+ 2 i. Walter2 Daux was born about 1625.

Child of Richard Daux is:
194 i. Walter Daux, born Abt. 1625 in probably England; died Abt. 1658 in probably Charles City Co., VA; married Mary Feb?.

400. Jacques Chastain, born Abt. 1598 in Charost, Berri, France; died Bef. 1675 in Charost, Berri, France. He was the son of 800. Etienne Chastain. He married 401. Jeanne Audet.
401. Jeanne Audet, born in Charost, Berri, France; died Bef. 1667 in Charost, Berri, France.

Child of Jacques Chastain and Jeanne Audet is:
200 i. Estienne Chastain, born 30 Mar 1625 in Charost, Berri, France; died Abt. 1694 in Charost, Berri, France; married Jeanne Laurent.

402. Pierre Laurent

Child of Pierre Laurent is:
201 i. Jeanne Laurent, born Abt. 1627 in Charost, Berri, France; married Estienne Chastain.

448. ? Duvall

Notes for ? Duvall:
The following is copied and pasted from the introductions and prefaces to the following book:

MAREEN DUVALL
OF
MIDDLE PLANTATION

A Genealogical History of Mareen Duvall, Gent., of
the Province of Maryland and His Descendants With
Histories of the Allied Families of Tyler, Clarke,
Poole, Hall, and Merriken.

by
HARRY WRIGHT NEWMAN

Published by the Author
Washington
1952

Digital Edition © 2002 by Richard Bingham
Oceanport, NJ

ISBN 930968-31-0

This edition is limited to 350 copies

Your book is number _____

PRINTED IN U. S. A. - WHITTET & SHEPPERSON - RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

FOREWORD

IT WAS MY intentions to offer this genealogical history of a noble Maryland family in a much greater, comprehensive manner than what is now being presented to my Duvall kinsmen, but the preparation of a book of my visualized magnitude is time consuming, especially to an active and busy individual who has many activities and interests in this complex world of today.
Time is passing - my most interested and appreciated patrons are adding to their fourscore and ten and are a little apprehensive of my ambitions and aspirations. And the sands in my hour-glass too are rapidly dripping through that narrow stem into a heavy, bulky, and dark past, leaving only a few light particles of sand for an undeter­mined and brief future. So here it is-and the lines not carried down are left for the younger generation now living to complete as their maturer hours, yet to come, lead them into the past of their fore­fathers.
I would like to mention the name of a few friends who have aided me with their sympathy and encouragement, but lest I should offend a few by inadvertent omissions, I shall express my thanks to all with only a silent mention of their names. My appreciation, however, is warm to the Society of Mareen Duvall Descendants who has offered to finance the plates for Laval Castle, Holy Trinity Church, Marietta, and Prospect Hall, and to Mrs. Henry C. Kuhl who has honored her grandfather, Judge Benjamin Frank Duvall, of Trump's Hill, and to Mrs. Nicholas Leeke Dashiell and Miss Harriet Marine for their ancestral home of Walnut Range. Also to Miss Flavilla Waters Griffith, the oldest and nearest living descendant of our distinguished ancestor for her grandfather, Dr. Charles Duvall, her uncle Dr. William Duvall, her ancestral home of Goodwood, and her beloved Mammy of blessed memories - and to others who may wish to honor their forebears before the final publication of this history.
And last but by no means least to you my friend and kinsman who will buy this book and thus made it worthwhile, I extend my heart­felt thanks and gratitude.

HARRY WRIGHT NEWMAN.

Dated: February 14, 1952.

OTHER BOOKS BY HARRY WRIGHT NEWMAN

Anne Arundel Gentry
The Smoots of Maryland and Virginia
The Stones of Poynton Manor
The Lucketts of Portobacco
Maryland Revolutionary Records
Charles County Gentry
Seigniory in Early Maryland

CONTENTS

Foreword 5
Preface 9
Introduction 13
European Background 15
Mareen Du Vail, Gent., and History of Middle Plantation20
Captain John Duvall and His Descendants57
Mareen the Elder and His Descendants97
Judge Lewis Duvall and His Descendants141
Samuel Duvall and His Descendants148
Madam Eleanor Duvall Roberts161
Madam Susannah Duvall Tyler and Her Descendants162
Mareen the Younger and His Descendants209
Madam Catherine Duvall Orrick365
Madam Elizabeth Duvall Clarke and Her Descendants366
Madam Mary Duvall Hall and Her Descendants385
Madam Johannah Poole and Her Descendants455
Benjamin Duvall and His Descendants472
Merriken Family 536
Miscellaneous 551

PREFACE

In the absence of recorded evidence in genealogy, it is well to take the statements, though at times with reservations, as it is further demonstrated, of the nearest generation to the ancestor. To my knowledge Judge Gabriel Duvall has been the nearest descendant of the emigrant, that is great-grandson, who left a written record of our ancestor. Judge Duvall, however, failed to state the name of the emigrant's parents which easily could have been handed down from father to son with some degree of authenticity to the fourth genera­tion.* We can assume that Judge Duvall did not know.
While Judge Gabriel Duvall was a great-grandson of the emigrant, he again failed to leave to posterity the name of his great-grand­mother, one of the wives of the emigrant. It is not altogether in-creditable to assume that he knew the names of the wives, and for this omission it is difficult to forgive. We do not know the identity of his last wife who is often incorrectly given as Mary Stanton.
Judge Duvall wrote a letter to a kinsman, printed below, which demonstrates how the statements of an older member of a family can not be relied upon too accurately or should not be taken too seriously. Some comments, obviously my personal opinion, are sub­stantiated by the analysis of objectivities, while other more concrete annotations are direct contradictions of impeachable source documents. The comments, however, are not made in the spirit of iconoclasm, but in the matter of truth which all true genealogists seek.

Marietta, Aug. 1841.
Dear Sir-
Your letter by mail was duly rec'd, your enquiry is in relation to the origin of the Duvall family.1 I am too feeble to say much on the subject and writing is peculiarly irksome. My Physician cautions me against it - You will have some account of the branch of the family from whom you are descended: - Mareen Duvall, the first of the name in Maryland emigrated from France, his native country on account of the persecuting spirit of the Government prevalent at that period. He arrived in Maryland the middle of the 17th Century, soon after the settlement of the then Province. He was a merch't and soon became a wealthy land holder. He died in August 1694 leaving 12 children - 6 sons and 6 daughters. He was thrice married.2 By his first wife he had 5 children; by his second wife 7 (seven). His third wife buried him. She was entombed in a vault at the Chapel (in Darnell's Grove) and with her Martha Duvall, daughter of Lewis one of the sons of Mareen. His children were - Mareen, John, Eleanor, Samuel, Susannah by his first wife. Lewis, Mareen, Catherine, Mary, Elizabeth, Johanna, Benjamin by his second wife.3 The said seven were all minors at the time of his decease as appears by his will.4 He had 2 sons named Mareen, one from each of his first 2 wives, he left a large estate and provided for each of his children a comfortable estate.5
Eleanor married John Roberts of Virginia.6 Catherine married William Orrick 22nd Oct. 17--. Johanna married Richard Poole 12 August 1703, of their posterity their friends in Maryland know nothing.7
Mareen the Eldest was married many years before his father's death and left issue, Western Branch Mareen as he was then called, and John Plara [Peirce] Duvall who removed to Virginia were among his descendants. John the second son8 married and had numerous offsprings. From him descended the Wakes [Waters], Mersureys [Maroney], Nelsons, and Farmers. Lewis the fourth son married Martha Ridgely March 5, 1699. He left issue. He removed to one of the Carolinas. Mareen the 2d & 5th son married Elizabeth Jacob 4th Oct 1701 and he had issue (names and births from All Hallows Parish followed). .... Samuel the third son was married to Elizabeth Clarke in 1697.9 He had seven daughters and no sons. From him descended the Falconers, Becks, Forrests. The eldest daughter married Edward Tyler, they had issue.
Susanna second daughter of Mareen Duvall married Robert Tyler. They had issue and hence the Tyler family. From the Tyler family descended the Lamars and the Baldwins. Mary the 4th daughter married the Rev. Henry Hall, they had a numerous progeny ....... [original torn] resided in the neighbourhood of the Governor Bridge and South River. The ancestors were buried a few miles North East of the Governor's Ridge. I might proceed and fill volumes, but
must conclude.
Very Respectfully,
(signed) Gabriel Duvall
Marcus Duvall, Esq.,
Buena Vista P.O.,
Prince Georges County, Maryland.
__________
2 He had no tradition of a possible marriage in France.
3 Susannah may be of an earlier marriage, but I feel that Lewis was of the first rather than the second.
4 Lewis could not have been too much of a minor, as he was to assist his brother and step-mother in the management of the estate.
5 He cut Mareen the Elder off with 5 shillings; likewise Eleanor.
6 This is where the Virginia myth originated. John Roberts' father was a Mary­land planter and landed proprietor and devised his son John realty. John may have removed to Virginia, but he certainly left Eleanor behind.
7 He apparently had no knowledge of a son settling in England who actually maintained a high position. It is logical that he knew nothing of the posterity in Maryland. The scion who remained in Maryland married definitely into the yeoman class, had no land, and thus descended to the position of a tenant farmer without position and estate. It was some hundred years thereafter that a branch or two gained any vestige of a social position and thus recaptured the near-status which the emigrant held but briefly. Notably, Henry Poole, of Frederick County; John Poole, of Montgomery County, who was elevated by a Sprigg match.
8 Source documents state that John was definitely the son and heir.
9 She was a Widow Clarke.

Much credence has also been given in the preparation of this genealogy to the notes written in 1839 by Dr. Grafton Duvall, educated at St. John's College, Annapolis, and at the University of Pennsylvania. He was born in 1780 and during the early period of his life came in contact with the grandchildren of the emigrant whose memories were certainly not too impaired. All statements made by Dr. Duvall have been checked with source documents, insofar as such source docu­ments exist, and only in a few instances have there been discrepancies.
The father of Dr. Grafton Duvall, a great-grandson of the emigrant, died in 1811 at which time Dr. Duvall was 31 years of age, and it is evident that he obtained much first hand information from his father - a brilliant and scholarly gentleman.
When documentary evidence could not be found, Dr. Duvall's notes have been given as the authority, and being a genealogist who gives credence to tradition, when it is consistent, rational, and in­capable of disapproval, I therefore consider the statements made by Dr. Duvall as reasonably authentic.

INTRODUCTION

There was a book published in 1947 entitled "Across the Years in Prince Georges County" with only a reference or two to the Duvall family. Actually no history of Prince Georges is complete without mention of the Duvalls. They intermarried with all the gentry families of the Anglican oligarchy of the county and it can be safely written that no family in the Colonies married more with their kins­men than the Duvalls - union with first cousins was most frequent.
The seed was planted in Anne Arundel County, but by 1710 most of the scions had removed to Prince Georges on land patented by the Emigrant in then Calvert County, the latter in 1695 becoming the northern portion of Prince Georges with the Patuxent River as the common boundary. Most of the Duvalls lived on "Darnall's Grove" and "Pleasant Grove," two large tracts of 3,800 and 1,600 acres respec­tively which were divided into smaller plantations. Not a few gave individual names to their seats to distinguish them from the planta­tions of their kinsmen on the same tracts - thus we have Marietta, Prospect Hill, and others not found in letters patent issued by the Lords Baltimore.
As the Province grew, younger sons settled on western lands and before the Revolution they were well seated in Frederick County especially the Lower District which became Montgomery County in 1776 and a few were even on the Virginia frontier. After the Revolu­tion several purchased plantations in Anne Arundel County and those who settled on the north shore of the Severn and intermarried with the Ridouts, Boones, and Harwoods formed a social clique unequalled in culture, intelligence, and position.
Much discussion and some unqualified statements have been made relative to the original spelling of the name. It was not Gabriel Duvall, the Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, who first used the single 1. Mareen, the Emigrant, wrote his name as DuVall, the orthography used by the succeeding generations. But it was the son or grandchildren of Judge Gabriel Duvall who first adopted the old Angevin spelling of DuVal and which has been adopted by others, including those who settled in Alabama.
The name Duval is definitely what the French call de voisinage meaning neighborhood and was obviously given, when names were introduced into the French Provinces, to the patriarch of a family living in a vale or dale. A descendant who is interested in the early history has another theory of the name derivation. The original Castle of LaVal consisted of wooden fortifications and was referred to as the valla, a barricade, from the Latin de vallis. As the Duvalls were the first Seigneurs to occupy the Castle of Laval, they became known as the familia de vallis, hence DuVal.

In religion the family was all communicants of the Church of Eng­land during the colonial period, yet two in 1778 refused to take an oath, consequently they affirmed their allegiance to the new Govern­ment. Captain John Duvall, son of the Emigrant, and his wife gave the land for the first church of Queen Anne's Parish, but most of the Duvalls worshipped in the Chapel of Ease at Collington, now the independent Parish of Holy Trinity, which was nearer to their plantations.
While the family was not conspicuous during the colonial period in military and civil service (two sons of the Emigrant - John and Lewis - were the exception), during the Revolution a number held commissions and three were accorded membership in the Society of the Cincinnati under the Rule of 1854.
Since the formation of the Republic the name of Duvall is found upon rosters of all our wars, but with the migrations it is difficult to ascertain at times whether the names found at the War Department are descendants of our venerable ancestor, Mareen DuVal, or from the various other branches.
Virginia who never likes to be out done by Maryland had her branch founded by a Daniel Duvall.* Then there were branches of the family in French Louisiana, and about the time of the War Be­tween the States some Duvalls from French Canada had penetrated New England and New York while others via Windsor and Detroit were found in Michigan and Wisconsin. While some of the Penn­sylvania Duvalls are descendants of Mareen, others can not be so satisfactorily placed, with a feeling that those domiciled around Phila­delphia may not be coming from our ancestor.
__________
* Some thought exists among certain descendants of Mareen Duvall that the Virginia Duvalls are coming from Mareen, but there is not the slightest clue or circ*mstantial evidence to prove or to assume any connections on this side. Daniel Duvall, a house designer and builder styled carpenter of that day, was in Ware Parish, Gloucester County, before June 1704. From that county branches spread out to Caroline, King William, Henrico, etc. It also had distinguished sons, William Pope Duvall, Governor of Florida, his brother John Pope Duvall, Secretary of State for Florida and one-time Acting Governor, Colonel Daniel Duvall member of the Society of the Cincinnati, etc. See, The DuVal Family of Virginia, by Bessie Berry Grabowski.

DUVAL
Arms executed by the Hennessee Studio, Salisbury, N.C.

EUROPEAN BACKGROUND

Much traditional and imaginable qualities have been at play con­cerning the immediate and remote ancestors of Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation - but insofar as this research has been carried out, no conclusive nor even "thread" proof has been found for his immediate forbears.*
It was more than ordinary coincidence that Mareen Duvall called his first land patent "Laval." It was quite characteristic of the Eng­lish and Scottish gentry of early Maryland to name their plantations after their ancestral estates or native British parishes, and by such names it has offered clues to prove the ancestry of the early Maryland settlers in Great Britain. Mareen Duvall, therefore, seemed to have followed the English pattern. Maryland, it must be remembered, was the only colony which adopted this English system of specifically and officially designating each plantation with a distinctive name, and it was not discontinued until the American Revolution.
Laval therefore had distinct, sentimental values for Mareen Duvall, and the fact that he gave it to his initial land patent is prima-facie evidence that his branch of the Duval family had its seat or roots in or near the old medieval city of Laval. And it is not altogether im­possible to imagine that he was born there in the shadow of the old castle which stands today as a symbol of strength and power of the Middle Ages.
Laval is the capital of the Department of Mayenne, France - a town 42 miles east of Rennes - once a part of the ancient Province of Anjou but later to come under the influence of both Brittany and Normandy. The recorded history of Laval goes back to the last years of the 10th century.* At that time there existed on the actual site of the city a "vallum" or permanent embankment constructed of earthworks on which were erected wooden fortifications.
From the 11th century a stone castle took the place of the first construction, and the Lords of Laval witnessed a certain number of inhabitants seeking protection beneath its walls. They had at this time some power and made valuable alliances, one of which was with William, Duke of Normandy, known better in England as the Con­queror, who had just brought under his rule a
__________
* At one time I contemplated going direct to France and indulging in the archives at the French capital and then to Laval, the capital of the Province of Mayenne, where the Maryland emigrant was either born or where his immediate ancestors sprung. Expediency prevented this, yet, as I write these chronicles for publication, I regret my decision not to have taken that opportunity.
* Translated by Mr. Charles Y. Duncan, of Louisville, a member of the Duvall Society, from "En Plein Air," Mai 1932, Revue Mensuelle Officielle de la Federa­tion des Syndicate d'lnitiatives, Vallee, Chateaux et Plages de la Loire, 6 Place Royale, Nantes.

16

part of England, and another with Guy V, who married the sister of Geoffrey Plantagenet, King of England. During the 13th century the Lords of Laval were among the retinue of the kings of France on the Crusades to the Holy Land.
At the end of the 12th century the Castle of Laval was already a powerful fortress protecting the flow of the Mayenne River. The dungeon was then constructed of its present remarkable woodwork, as well as the underground church (or crypt) which may be seen today. The city spread gradually out from the foundations of its walls. Trinity Church, today a cathedral, existed then in part. Its beautiful nave was built at that time.
The Middle Ages or during the 13th and 14th centuries witnessed the growth of the city. The town at first clustered around the walls of the castle and extended to the left bank of the river which the Old Bridge (Vieux-Pont) touches. Later the bourgeoise developed a flourishing textile industry in the town and its environs.
At different periods the kings of France were in residence at Laval: Louis XI in 1472; Charles VIII in 1487, 1488, and 1491; Francis I in 1532; then Henry IV. In 1856 and 1858 the town was visited by Emperor Napoleon III. Then followed the War of 1871. The Ger­man invasion was stopped at the gates of Laval near Barbe Lake. A simple monument commemorates the memory of those who fell there for their country during that war.
Thus ends the translation from the Revue. Certainly, the ancestors of Mareen were hosts to royalty as they visited the medieval strong­hold and the castle.
The suggestion that the mother of Mareen was of the Huguenot family of Marine, a member of whom settled upon the Eastern Shore, lacks definite or conclusive proof. It was not characteristic of the Gallic families to give the maternal family name to their off-springs - an individualistic quality of the British and it never penetrated France or even other countries of the Continent.
The family, according to the Dictionnaire de la Noblesse, published by Schelesinger Freres, Paris, 1865, was an ancient one and originated in Caen, Normandy, where it held first rank from time immemorial. Of this Norman family Etienne Duval in 1548 was raised to the ranks of the nobility by King Henry II in consideration of services ren­dered by him and his predecessors. Blaise Duval, of Abbeville in Picardy, in 1540 likewise received favors from the King.
We wonder in our conquest what relationship our distinguished American ancestor was to his none-the-less distinguished, if notorious, compatriot and contemporary, Claude Duvall, of Normandy, He was born in 1643 and went to England in the retinue of the Duke of Richmond at the Restoration, but the tales of Robin Hood and life in Merrie England aspired him to emulation, for he soon took to the life of a highwayman and became famous no less for his gallantry to woman than for the extent of audacity to his robberies. He was caught and executed on January 21, 1670, at Tyburn, but was buried in Covent Garden Church, certainly with the benefit of clergy. A memorial in the church was erected to him bearing the following inscription:

"Here lies DuVall: Reader if male thou art,
Look to thy purse; if female to thy heart."

The late Mrs. Hester Dorsey Richardson in a series of articles printed in the Baltimore Sun at the turn of the 20th century gave a very colorful story of various members of the Duvall family in the 13th and 14th centuries, though citing no sources for her statements, and assumed that they were the ancestors of Maren Duval of Middle Plantation. But there are 150 years or approximately five generations between the closing days of the 15th century and 1659, when Maren Duval appeared upon the scene in Provincial Maryland, to reconcile. It was her belief that Maren was descended from the family in "Lor­raine la Ville de Remiremont," but did not qualify the place which when translated literally is "Lorraine the city of Remiremont." Mrs. Richardson presumably misinterpreted the Huguenot historian (see The American Historical Register, edited by Charles H. Browning, Mar.-Aug. 1895, p. 1476) when he stated that "the origin of the name du Val was probably in Lorraine from la Ville Remiremont, Vosges. The earliest mention I find is Richard Du Val, Normandy, 1261." If the earliest mention is the year 1261 in Normandy what was his basis for a Lotharingian origin?
The authoritative gazetteers list only Lorraine (Lothringen), an­ciently the Kingdom of Lothair, now part of the French district known as Alsace-Lorraine. No provincial town by the name of Lor­raine is listed by the gazetteers. Remiremont is a town on the Moselotte River in the Department of the Vosges which lies directly east of Alsace - both places (Lorraine and Remiremont) being as far remote from Laval and Normandy as they can possibly be without being in Germany.
Captain John Duvall, being the son and heir, was nearer to his parents than the other sons, and thus it can be assumed that he knew more about the French background of the family than the younger children. It is significant that in 1698 his wife bore him twin sons whom they named Mareen and Mountillion - two characteristic French names. Mareen after his parent and Mountillion definitely after some significant personage or place connected with the family. Neither Mountillion, Montillion or varied spellings can be found in the gazetteer to give any credence to a place, but definitely the name was not given without some thought and certainly with significance.

There is a possibility of Mountillion being a corruption of Montyon, for in the 18th century Baron de Montyon, a Parisian philanthropist and economist, was made a councilor of state. But the most likely possibility is that the name has been incorrectly transcribed from the badly written script on the parish register, and the last syllable iers resembled lion the latter now appearing in the transcripts. Montilliers is a small chateau town in the Department of Maine-et-Loire, a de­partment which borders Mayenne on the south, Laval being the capital of the latter. And Mayenne and Maine-et-Loire were both carved out of the ancient Province of Anjou which become a fief of the Dukes of Normandy, and also the Crown of England, - all of which formed part of that once Angevin Empire perfected by Henry II (1154-1189), of England. Neither Montilliers nor Montillion are family names found in the Dictionnaire de la Noblesse.
None of the given names of Mareen's children except that of Mareen are characteristic French cognomens. True John, Lewis, and Benjamin have their equivalent in French, but they including Samuel are all definitely British names.
That the family was wide-spread in France is brought out by the various number of Duval arms issued to branches in Paris, Rouen, Beaulieu (towns in the Departments of Correze and Maine-et-Loire), in Maine, Ile de France, Languedoc (an old province in the south of France whose ancient capital was Toulouse), Artois, Brittany, Nor­mandy, and Champagne. Besides patents issued by the various heraldic institutions of the Gallic Provinces, there were Duval armorial families in Sweden, Switzerland, Flanders, and even at a later date arms were issued to a Duval family by the English College of Arms.
Like the Gallic background, the authentic coat-of-arms used by Mareen Duval of Middle Plantation or the one to which he was en­titled has been the subject of much discussion. There is no mention of a seal or coat-of-arms in the inventory of his estate, though it could have been lumped with "Silver plate, 182 ounzes," and none of the extant last wills and testaments of the Duvalls in Maryland, examined, contain an armorial bearing. No early gravestones have been found with the arms. Furthermore, no old silver, so far as it is known, has come down in the family with a crest or coat-of-arms.
According to Planches de l'Armorial General, by Johannes Baptiste Riestap, twenty-six varied Duval (Duvall) coats-of-arms are listed. None, however, show the arms used by the majority of the members of the Maryland Duvall descendants today.
Judge Gabriel Duvall was the nearest member to the emigrant who is known to have used an armorial seal, but no verbal tradition nor written record has come down to the present generation from Judge Duvall to prove how he acquired it and his authority for using it. There should be no doubt, however, in the mind of the present generation relative to any incorrect claims made or assumed by the Justice.
A great-grandson of Judge Duvall, Mr. Gabriel DuVal, writing on December 16, 1903, stated the following: "The coat-of-arms is the same that I have on a large brass seal which has been in my family for many years, copies of which I have also given away."
The arms referred to by Mr. DuVal appeared in a cut in the Balti­more Sun on April 5, 1903, and is described as follows:

Arms - Gules, a chevron between, in chief two mullots* and in base a battle-axe argent.
Crest - A lion sejant, supporting with the dexter paw a scutcheon charged with the
bearings of the shield.
Motto - Pro Patria

It is noted that Mr. DuVal did not credit the arms as having been used by Judge Duvall, but merely "[it] has been in my family for many years." Many years is indefinite and is at times difficult to cal­culate.
It was said that Mr. Grafton Duvall Sr., of Pittsburgh, had the seal ring reputed to have belonged to Mareen the Emigrant, having been given to Mr. Duvall by his father Dr. Wirt Duvall who had received it from Richard Mareen Duvall. Upon investigation it was learned that the ring was possessed by Grafton Duvall Jr., of the United States Navy, who was kind enough to make an impression and also to advise that the mark of "Tiffany, Jewelers, of New York" was on the inside band of the ring. This fact definitely disproves any claims for its antiquity. The impression indicates that it is not a seal ring, for it contains only the crest, as described elsewhere, under which is the family motto "Pro Patria."...

Child of ? Duvall is:
224 i. Mareen Duvall, born Abt. 1620 in Laval, Brittany, France?; died Abt. 1694 in "Middle Plantation" near present-day Davidsonville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA; married (1) ?; married (2) Susannah Brasseur?.

452. Thomas Stockett, Jr., born in Probably County Kent, England; died Oct 1638 in St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, County Kent, England. He was the son of 904. Thomas Stockett and 905. Joan Biggs. He married 453. Frances Ayleworth 1616.
453. Frances Ayleworth, died Abt. 1648. She was the daughter of 906. Walter Ayleworth and 907. Jane Stockett.

More About Thomas Stockett, Jr.:
Burial: Beakesbourne, County Kent, England

Children of Thomas Stockett and Frances Ayleworth are:
i. Col. Lewis Stockett, born Bef. 23 Sep 1622 in St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, County Kent, England; died Aft. 1664 in Probably Kent Island, Maryland USA.
ii. Dr. Francis Stockett, born Bef. 25 Jul 1629 in St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, County Kent, England; died Aft. 1682 in Probably Maryland.
226 iii. Capt. Thomas Stockett III, born Bef. 02 Apr 1635 in County Kent, England; died Apr 1671 in "The Obligation," All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA; married Mary Wells Bef. 1667.
iv. Henry Stockett, born Bef. 15 Aug 1636 in Beakesbourne, County Kent, England; died 1682 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; married Katharine.

454. Dr. Richard Wells, born in possibly Cornwall, England; died 1667 in Herring Creek area of Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA. He married 455. Frances Whyte?.
455. Frances Whyte?, born 18 Jul 1616 in Hutton, County Essex, England; died 19 Sep 1677 in "Downs on the Severn, " Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA. She was the daughter of 910. Robert Whyte? and 911. Mary Sheldon?.

Notes for Dr. Richard Wells:
Notes for DR. RICHARD WELLS, Gentleman:
Richard Wells, a leading Puritan, set sail for Virginia, where he was granted 50 acres, on 12 September 1637, settling in Charles County. The fact that he received a mere 50 acres as a headright indicates that he was wealthy enough to finance his own passage. There is no record of his transporting a family, therefore he must have married in Virginia. By profession he was a surgeon.

In 1645, he was elected a member of the House of Burgesses from Upper Norfolk County.

In 1652 or 1653, after the Act of Toleration was passed by Maryland, Richard and Frances and their 11 children moved to that state. Twenty other people accompanied them, and for transporting these people Richard was granted 1100 acres of land. "5 October, 1653: Mr. Richard Wells demands land for transporting these several persons into Maryland to plant and inhabit: himself, Frances, his wife, Richard, William, George, John, Robert, Benjamin, Mary, Ann, Elizabeth, and Frances Wells, his children, and Thomas BOONE, Henry SYMONDS, George HALL, Thomas LINSTEAD, Edward HOWARD, and Martha WINDWRIGHT, his servants, being all transported, as aforesaid, since June, 1652. Mr. Richard Wells assigns to Mr. William AYRES 600 acres of land out of his rights here above expressed. Signed, Richard Wells. Witness, Thomas HATTON. Warrant to lay out for Mr. Richard Wells, 300 acres of land in any part of the Province not formerly taken up."

He first settled the area of Baltimore County around Sepesutia Hundred (now Harford County), and later settled on 600 acres on Herring Bay in Anne Arundel County, near the Quaker settlement. It is said that their estate, called "Wells," took upon itself all the features of an English Manor.'

At some point, he was conveyed land by a John LANGFORD of Middlesex, ENGLAND, and was styled "surgeon of Anne Arundel County."

By 1654, the Puritans had gained control of the Province and on 1 March 1664/5, Richard was appointed for the "orderinge, directinge, and governinge of the assayers of Maryland" by William Fendell and William Durant, who represented the Lord Protector. After Lord Baltimore regained his rights, Richard continued to hold office as Justice of the Peace under Governor Fendall (his dual alliances obviously served him well).

On 22 July 1654, Governor Stone of Maryland appointed Richard to the Parliamentary Commission. He was also given power to hold courts for the administration of justice in such place and at such times as he thought necessary. He was also a member of the Severn Provincial Council in 1655, and a member of the Quorum and Puritan Council. In 1657 he was appointed by Governor Fendall as Commissioner of Anne Arundel Co., a post he held until 1661. In 1658 he was appointed a Justice of the Peace, and was also on the Puritan Council of 1658 after the Calverts had regained control of their provinces. In 1659 and at the April session of 1661 he was a member of a Grand Jury, and that year was a presiding Justice of the Court.

"1658: Mr. Richard Wells enters these rights, transported into this Province since 1658, viz, Richard Wells, Sr., Francis Wells, William Wells, George Wells, John Wells, Robert Wells, Benjamin Wells, Martha Wells, Mary Wells, Anna Wells, Elizabeth Wells, and Robert SABEN, Thomas BONIRE(?), George HALL, Henry SIMONS, Thomas LINSTIER(?), Edward HOWARD, Martha WINDWRIGHT, Taish(?) WILLSON, Ollrick Trish ROY, Faulle MADAGON, Edward TAYOR, Robert OWEN, Timothy OWEN, Richd JOHNSON, Thoms MORES, Will. CONAWAY, Mary FERINGS, George LINLONDS(?), Will. THOMPSON, Charles RYDER. Warrant to survey for Rich'd Wells, 1100 acres. Ret. 22 February next. Signed 23 July 1658, George PUDDINGTON."

It is a true act of tolerance that Richard's daughter Mary married Thomas Stockett. Richard Wells was a leader in the Puritan movement in which the Stockett family had lost everything!

Richard's will was written on 22 Jun 1667 and proved in Anne Arundel Co. on 21 August 1667. By this time, he had accumulated 4,025 acres of land in Maryland. His estate, "Wells," was left to his son Richard. He also left a bequest of 100 pounds to his daughter Mary, wife of Thomas Stockett, to be paid in the City of London after his death. Richard also maintained an estate back in England. His son had his will proved in the prerogative court of Canterbury in 1668. The estate inventory included a case of "chirurgeon's instruments and a chirurgeon's chest." Richard also held interests in the ships "Majestic" and "Baltimore". In general, the inventory of his estate revealed great wealth for that period of time.

Notes for Frances Whyte?:
Comments by Bryan S. Godfrey:

It was long claimed that Richard Wells' wife Frances was a daughter of Richard White/Whyte and Lady Catherine Weston, the latter having been a daughter of the Earl of Portland with many lineages back to the English nobility and royalty. However, it was later proven that Richard and Catherine's daughter Frances married John Petre, which was a disappointment to the many descendants of Richard Wells. Nonetheless, Jim White's 2009 publication "Richard Wells & Frances White Virginia-Maryland 1635 & 1637" states that Frances White Wells was instead a daughter of Richard's brother Robert Whyte and his wife Mary Sheldon. The Whyte side is still traceble to several noble families of England, including the Hungerfords, Strelleys, and Willoughys, all of which should be traceable back to royalty. The following evidence was presented by the late Harry Wright Newman for the marriage of Richard Wells to Frances White:

http://cecilcountymdgenealogy.pbworks.com/Jerome+White

EVIDENCE THAT RICHARD WELLS MARRIED FRANCES WHITE

1. Headrights were claimed for Richard Wells and Frances White during the year 1637 in Virginia. Reference: Patent Book no. 1, pt. 1, folios

443,481, Land Office, Richmond.

2. Jerome White, Esq. Is placed as son of Richard White, Esq., of County Essex, England, and grandson of Richard Weston, Earl of Portland. Reference:

Complete Peerage (1st ed), vol. 7, pp. 269-270; Morant's Essex, vol. 1, pp. 194-195; Visitation of Essex 1634, Harleian Soc. Pub., vol. 13, p. 521

3. Jerome White, Esq., Surveyor General of Maryland, named his manor "Portland" after his grandfather. Reference: Liber 11, folios 205-206, Land Office, Annapolis.

4. Frances White is proved as a daughter of Richard White, Esq., of County Essex. Reference: Visitation of Essex 1634, Harleian Soc. Pub., vol. 13, . 521

5. Jerome White, Esq., prior to a trip to England appointed Thomas Stockett, Acting Surveyor General of the province. Reference: Archives of Maryland, vol. 57, pp. 500-501

6. Jerome White, Esq., referred to his "cosen" George Yate in a boundary dispute. Reference: Liber 12, folio 558, Land Office, Annapolis.

7. Thomas Stockett by his will bequeathed a mare to his kinsman, Henry White. In 1670 Henry White claimed land rights for his emigration to the province and received a warrant for 50 acres. Reference: Wills, Liber 1, folio 430; Liber 16, folio 73, Land Office, Maryland

8. The White, Wells, Stockett, and Yate were armorial families, and therefore of a social position to intermarry with the gentry and a scion of nobility.

8-a. Madame Yate, nee Mary Wells, willed to her eldest daughter Madame Frances Duvall "my silver seal in a lozenge shield". Ref: Wills, Liber 6, folio 212

8-b. The inventory of the estate of Colonel George Wells, son of Richard Wells, has listed a coat-of-arms. Ref: Inventories and Accounts, Hall of Records, Annapolis.

8-c. Thomas Stockett by his will bequeathed "his dear and loving brother Francis Stockett my silver seale with the arms of our family engraved thereon". Ref: Wills, Liber 1, folio 430. Thomas Stockett II placed the impression of the Stockett arms on his will of 1732. Ref: Original will on file at Hall of Records, Annapolis.

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http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/th/read/WELLS/1998-12/0914939992

From: Carol Mitchell
Subject: Re: [WELLS-L] Fw: Frances Whyte Wells
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998 08:59:52 -0500

Just what I have seen some have said this is not enough research..
This is from the Maryland Genealogy Quarterly:
In a report for Anthony R J S Adolph, Research Dept., Achievement Ltd,
79-82, Northgate, Canterbury , Kent CT 1-1BA. The main evidence comes from
the Essex Recusant, Journal Vol. 17#1, of the Essex Recusant Society. Where
Father Godfrey Anstruther abstracted the wills of Benjamin Petre, Frances
Petre his mother, formerly White, and her husband John Petre. "Benjamin
Petre, alias White, Bishop... was the eldest son of John Petre, Esq. of New
House on Cooksmill Green, Writtle, Essex, by his second wife, Elizabeth,
daughter of John Pinchon of Writtle. Born August 10, 1672, he lost his
mother in 1678 and his father took a third wife, Frances White, from whom
Benjamin derives his alias. She was the daughter of Richard White and
Catherine, daughter of Richard Weton, first Earl of Portland. Frances was
sister of jerome White who served mary of madena and was given a jewel by
Prince Rinaldo, a Jewel which Jerome bequeathed to Frances (Vol. II, 348)."
(Frances' husband John was the son of Lord John Petre and Mary Waldegrave,
and grandson of Sir William Petre, secretary to Queen Mary and Queen
Elizabeth.) The article goes on to delineate the caree of Benjamin Petre
who was consecrated bishop of Prusa and vicar of the London district. He
had a London residence, first at Stafford House, near St. James Park and
later at King's Street, Golden Square where he died December 22, 1758. He
was buried at St Pancras, but in 1908 his body was reburied at St Edmund's
Ware, Herts. He had tow brothers who also became priests (Francis & Philip
Petre). [Seminary Priests by Father Godfrey Anstruther, pp 165-168, fro
Essex Recusant Vol. 17 #1]. Lady Catherine Weston White epitaph [....
Catherine Weston wife of Portland of Great Britian .. leaft England with
her husband & family and finally came to Rome, .. having left eight
children behind.. Nov 1645 age 38, Richard White of Essex in Great Britian,
placed this in memory of his wife]. Five of the eight children have been
identified, George born in 1628 (of MD land records), Elizabeth, Frances,
Catherine, & Jerome White Surveyor General of Maryland. In the Harry Wright
Newman papers at Charles county Community College, Newman lists as his
first proof of the marriage of Richard Wells and Frances White that they
both received headrights in Virginia in the same year 1637. [Harry Wright
Newman Collection, Southern Maryland Studies Center, Charles County
Community College, "Evidence That Richard Wells married Frances White"
(Newman's refrence: Patent Book,#1, pt. 1 folio 443, 481, Land Office
Annapolis (Was not found in Annapolis, but at the Virginia State Library,
12th and Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia 23219, and only folio 481 could
be located there). Extensive searches of passenger lists of immigrants to
this country did not reveal the name of our Frances White. On listing
obtained from settler's land grants in Maryland. One listing obtained from
settler's land grants in Maryland [Skordas, Gust, Early Settlers of
Maryland, Baltimore, MD 1986 p. 499] did show a Frances White, but this
was followed by the fact that she was the wife of one Joseph White. The
date of those headrights was 1637, the same year as Richard Wells. This may
be where the whole misinformation began. The balance of Newman's evidence
related primarily to Jerome and George's records. Going back to Frances'
birth ca 1632 (she was the third child listed, with the first, George, born
in 1628) and using an arbitary lapse of births every two years, she would
have been born in 1632. Using that as a guideline, Frances would have been
20 years old when Richard Wells and his Frances arrived in Maryland in
1652. She could not, have had eleven children in that time. Wurts did say
that she was born in 1622. We have not found any evidence to support this
at all. He may have misread the dates
Carol (Gehrs) Mitchell, 134 Schnauzer Lane, Beaver Falls, PA 15010
724-847-4473 [using The Master Genealogist 3.5, WP8,
Eudora]

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http://whitesnet.org/Wells-White.htm

This book is an attempt to set the genealogical record straight after more than 130 years of conflated information as has came forward because of the errant Visitations of County Essex, England. Dates of the Visitations were 1552, 1558, 1612 and 1634 were compiled and edited by Walter C. Metcalfe, and published March 1879 in London. The information used to prove the associated ancestries in this book are many, but the data was independently verified using original manuscripts in England. Many dates used herein will challenge researchers for the dates commonly assumed correct are in fact off by as many as fifty years for dates of specific individuals enumerated herein. Do not believe Lord Richard Weston engaged his twelve-year old daughter with a marriage contract to a man forty years older than her. Richard Whyte, the father of Richard Whyte made the contract with Lord Richard Weston; it is extant. Richard Whyte who married Catherine Weston was born October 13, 1595 at Hutton Hall, Essex, Englan

This book draws heavily on hard records from England, Italy, Canada and the United States that no serious researcher can or will dispute because we posses more than 3,000 hard copies of original documents to back our research. Many of them with readable signatures and seals of the individuals involved, which includes wills, deeds, marriage records and more than 1000 letters that have came down in our Whyte-White family archives. We possess the Original letter written by Queen Mary asking her Lady in Waiting, Susan Whyte, to return to her household and continue the position. Susan was the daughter of Sir Richard Whyte II and his wife, Lady Margaret Strelley.

Susan White was the daughter of Richard White of Hutton, Essex and his wife, Lady Margaret Strelley. She married Thomas Tonge, Clarencieux King-at-arms, and perhaps is better known to history as Susan Clarencieux. As early as 1525, Susan was in the service of Mary Tudor and went with her to Ludlow Castle when she took up her duties as Princess of Wales. She remained with Mary until she was dismissed in late 1533 and then returned in 1536 after Susan's husband Thomas Tonge died, and when Mary's household was reorganized. She was one of three ladies Mary asked for by name. In 1544, Susan received an annuity of £13 and the grant of the Manor of Rivenhall (Susan bequeathed Rivenhall to her brother George). When Mary became queen, Susan was her mistress of robes. In 1554 she was granted Chingford Earls and Chingford St. Pauls. In 1555 she was the only person present when the recently imprisoned Elizabeth Tudor met with her half sister the queen. Susan was also with Mary when she died on November 17, 1558 and the dying Mary gave her a number of gifts to insure her future. Susan left England to live in exile in 1559, accompanying Jane Dormer.

Richard Wells and Frances White, primary subjects of this book, are fully documented with hard proofs, which denies Frances White who married Richard Wells in January 1639 Charles River County Virginia ... was the daughter of Richard White Esquire and his wife, Lady Catherine Weston, daughter of Sir Richard Weston, the 1st Earl of Portland, and his wife, Lady Catherine Waldegrave.

For many years descendants of Mary Wells, daughter of Richard Wells and Frances White, who married first Thomas Stockett III, and married second George Yates, used the purported and errant family connection to join the Charlemagne Society, and several other organizations based upon the hierarchical pedigree of Lady Catherine Weston, the daughter of Sir Richard Weston who was the First Earl of Portland. That connection is no longer accepted by any organization that we are aware of, for those proofs as presented in the now published book deny the validity of it. In the book as published the pedigree of Frances White is correct, and can be fully validated using the hard proofs that we did include. Moreover, we corrected the previous errors in both the Stockett and Yates family's pedigrees and proved both families an additional two to four generations dependent on the family lineage, of which, we again possess and presented many substantial proofs. Proofs included for the Stockett family to 1527, and for the Yate-Yates family to 1469.

France White who married Richard Wells was the daughter of Robert White and his wife, Mary Sheldon - Robert White was the youngest sibling of Richard White Esquire who married Lady Catherine Weston.

Jim White, November 2009

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http://www.duvallsociety.org/files/Vol7_2-08_07.pdf

So You Think You Might Be a Descendant of Charlemagne?
The Mareen Duvall, the Elder and Frances Stockett Royal Line
By: Barrett L. McKown, Registrar
A number of years ago, in 1988 to be
exact, I discovered a descent from Charlemagne
in one of the Magna Charta
volumes, published by John S. Wurts in
the 1950's. This line connected to the
Mareen, the Elder line through his wife
Frances Stockett. Her father, Thomas
Stockett, married Mary Wells, daughter
of Richard Wells and Frances White, and
it was through the White/Weston/
Waldegrave families that the connection
was made to the Nevilles, Despensers,
Prince John of Gaunt, Edward III, William
the Conqueror, etc. back to Charlemagne.
The lineage through the Whites and
Westons to Charlemagne is not in question.
The question in dispute is whether
our Frances White is indeed the sister to
Jerome White and daughter of Richard
White and Katherine Weston. The Order
of the Crown of Charlemagne will not
accept the line for membership although
it apparently had been accepted many
years ago. Much work has been done
on this line by Mrs. Nellie Owings
Chaney of Baltimore and others whose
findings were printed in the Maryland
Genealogical Society Bulletin, Spring
1996, Vol. 37, p. 145-153. She had
previously published an article in the
Spring 1994 issue laying out all of the
royal connections.
The recent evidence indicates that
Katherine and Richard White's daughter,
Frances, never came to Maryland.
She was mentioned in her brother
Jerome's will that was probated in England
November 10, 1674 when he
willed her a jewel given to him by a
Page 3 Volume 7, Issue 2
Prince Renaldo. She was also mentioned
in the will of John Petre, Esq. as
his wife, and probated October 17,
1690, in Writtle, County Essex. The
will of Frances White Petre of New
House on Cooksmill Green, Writtle
was probated November 9, 1711 and
named her sister, Catherine White
and cousin Philip Waldegrave of Borley
as executors. It would seem from
the above that she was in England
and not in Maryland to be married to
Richard Wells.
Frances was born in 1632. Our Frances
and her husband, Richard Wells,
came to Maryland from Virginia in
1652 which would have made her
about 20-years-old. Maryland land
records show that Richard Wells, his
wife Frances, and 11 children arrived
in 1652. There is no way she could
have had 11 children by age 20! The
Whites were ardent Catholics and
Wells was a Puritan, an unlikely combination
for a marriage. Although
there has not been any mention of
whom the Frances White was who
married our Richard Wells, it is
unlikely, and probably biologically impossible
that his Frances is of the
White/Weston family.

Children of Richard Wells and Frances Whyte? are:
227 i. Mary Wells, born 02 Jul 1643 in Norfolk Co., VA; died 21 Jan 1698 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; married (1) Capt. Thomas Stockett III Bef. 1667; married (2) 1st George Yate Abt. 1672.
ii. Richard Wells, Jr., born in Norfolk Co., VA?; died Abt. Jun 1671 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; married Sophia Ewen.
iii. Frances Wells
iv. William Wells
v. Col. George Wells, born in Lower Norfolk Co., VA; died Jul 1696 in St. George's Parish, Baltimore Co., MD; married Blanche Goldsmith in Baltimore Co., MD; died 1704 in Baltimore Co., MD.
vi. John Wells, born in Norfolk Co., VA?; died Abt. Nov 1714 in Kent Isle, Queen Anne's Co., MD; married (1) Jane Lillingston; born in Probably Queen Anne's Co., MD; married (2) Anne Beedle Aug 1671; married (3) Mary Blangy Bef. Jul 1674.

Notes for John Wells:
http://emorys.info/family-tree/gensource/view_source/39/will-of-john-wells-1714-maryland-prerogative-court-via-huntington-collection

Will of John Wells, 1714 - Maryland Prerogative Court Via Huntington Collection

Source Text:
John Wells - Wills
Queen Annes - Kent Island
liber 14, folio 1

In the name of God Amen the 10th day of March (1714) I John Wells of Kent Island in Queen Anns County, Gent.....

Item: I give & bequeath unto my dear loving wife Jane Wells and (?) child which I (support?) she now goes with three hundred acres of land at point Cacoway next to (the?) point called broad field in Kent County Langford's Bay (and?) child which she goes with as above said & to her their heirs forever, and two hundred & fifty acres of land over (at?) wading place called Winchester and all her own lands (which said lands) together with all edifices, buildings, orchards (_?) shall be & remaine to her (& aforesaid?) child forever.

Item: I give and bequaeth unto my well beloved son John Wells my now dwelling plantation named Broad Creek with (all my?) contiguous & vacant land which I have ordered thereto also a certain tract at point Cacoway in Kent County aforesaid containing seven hundred acres called broad Knox Creek __ also one hundred acres of land called new France lying and being on Kent Island in Queen Anns County left me by my father in law Lewis Blangey to be & remaine to him & heirs of his body lawfully begotten for ever.

Item: I give & bequeath unto John Stevens my land called Tarkill lying on Kent Island aforesaid to him the said John Stevens & heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever on condition he the said John Stevens does resigne, disclaime & make over unto his brother Charles Stevens of the said island carpenter & joyner (all?) his right title, claime & demand & for to a certain parcell of land lying and being in _ Southern(s) Neck upon the said island, together with all the houses, out houses, orchards (?) But if it shall happen that said John Stevens should die without lawfull issue then my will is that said land called Tarkill shall fall to my said loving son John Wells & his heirs for ever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my daughter in law Jane Coursey all my right titles & interest in & unto a certain piece of land lying at the Narrows in Kent County aforesaid which was taken up in partnership between Col. Thomas Smith & my self called Smiths Meadows & to have (the?) division between him & me __ according as we made it, if (?) writing is to be found which to (on or two words?) my remembrance was upon a point of marsh (4 words illegible?) the west side & running north to (the?) extent of the land & that it shall be to her & (the?) lawfull heirs begotten of her body for ever. And as touching all the lands by me bequeathed as above (excepting and above said three hundred acres of land called broad field, the land called Winchester & that land which I had with my above named loving wife) the above named persons dying without issue I give & bequeath as followeth (viz) that if my said son John should die without issue I give unto John Stevens all my land called Broad Creek, provided he will be pleased to relinquish his right given him to the said land called Tarkill.

Item: And the land so relinquished as above by him the said John Stevens shall fall unto his brother Charles Stevens & to his legitimate issue for ever.

Item: The said seven hundred acres of land at point Cacoway above mentioned I give it to be divided equally between my two nephews Andrew Tollson and Richard Tollson & that the said Andrew have his first choyce & that the said land shall remaine to them & their heirs lawfully begotten for ever.

Item: the above said hundred acres of land called new France if my said son John Wells die without issue I give and bequeath (_?) unto my loving brother Jacob Blangey & after his decease t ohis son Jacob & if the said Jacob Blangey jr. should die without issue then I will that it fall to his brother Lewis Blangey & his heirs for ever, and I also give unto my said brother ?Jacob Blangey my best suite of apparrell.

Item: I give & bequeath unto William Rakes the debt which he owes me after my sons schooling for the year is subtracted then therefrom as also my riding coate & my white broad cloaths coate I give unto him.

Item: I give unto Philip Connor of the said Island that debt which is due from him to me, and I also give his son Philip one ewe.

Item: I give George Goodhawk a coate & pair britches, (Searge?) or Kersey, & to William Reading of Kent County five shillings.

Item: I give unto William Willson & Edward (Funing?) each an ewe at what time they are free and that they be sent away well apparrelled.

Item: I give my well beloved wife Jane Wells two negroes (viz) Jack & his negroe woman called Dinah. An my wil is that she have the use of part of the out houses & half the orchard wholy to her self untill my son come to the age of twenty years at waht time I will that he be of age & receive his part of my personall estate and all his lands as the law directs.

Item: I give unto my said son John Wells two negroes Cesar & Dorkey with all their future increase and also Dorkeys child named Dinah.

To conclude my will is that my personall estate be divided into three (par?) between my wife & children & that my said wife have her first choice and I do hire by constitute & apoint my said loving wife, my loving brother James Harriss of Kent County & John Stevens within mentioned to be my full & sole Executors to see the performance and executing of my last will and testament: and I do comitt my son John Wells to be under the tuition of my said brother James Harriss yet so as to remain with my loving wife so long as there shall be good schools kept upon Kent Island, in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seale the day and year within written

John Wells {Seale}

Sealed published & declared to be my last will & testament in the presence of
Thomas Godman
Robert (his "RB" marke) Blunt
George Mather
William Rakes
Matthew (his "M" marke) Griffith

Witnesses make oath November 15, 1714

John Carter

vii. Robert Wells
viii. Benjamin Wells, born in Norfolk Co., VA; died Bef. 1702 in All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD; married Frances Hanslap in All Hollow's Parish, Anne Arundel Co., MD.
ix. Martha Wells, married (1) William Ayres; born Abt. 1609 in England?; died 25 Mar 1655 in Battle of Severn, Anne Arundel Co., MD; married (2) Anthony Salway.

Notes for William Ayres:
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=brucen&id=I68

Name: William AYRES
Surname: Ayres
Given Name: William
Sex: M
Birth: 1609 in of Nansemond, Virginia (probably born England)
Death: 25 Mar 1655 in Battle of Severn, Anne Arundel County, Maryland
_UID: 0D918F6F9731D5118680EF90A100BA0B35FB
Note:
First records in America in Virginia Land Patent Records - William Eyres, 150 acres in County of Warrosquoyacke, on the Nean River, being an island called the Long Pond; due by order of the Court December 6, 1634, and due for his personal adventure and for the transportation of two persons, Robert Stanney and John Wood. By West, July 14 1636

30 June 1635. William HEIRES (EYRES) received 250 acres in Warrosquoiacke Co., VA (named changed in Isle of Wight Co. in 1637).

Virginia Land Records, Isle of Wight County Deeds and Other Records, Page 180
William Eyres, 250 acres in county of Warresquiaoke, on the "Maine Creek which runneth from the great river, called Warresquiaoke Creek", and on Nanemond River. Due for the transportation of 5 persons, Francis Stefferton, John Rashe, Humphrey Broad, John Pumpfrey, Will Empson. Granted June 30 , 1635.

Other land records also indicate that he was in Virginia by 1637.

Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part II, Page 73
William Eyres, 250 acs. Isle of Wight Co., 1 Nov 1637, p. 491. Beg. at a Red point that is joyning upon a small Cr., running up from the maine Cr. which runneth from the grat river called Warwickquicke Cr. W. & by S. & backwards into the woods, S. & by E. Upon Nansamund Riv. Trans. of 5 persons.

Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part II, Page 100
William Eyres, 100 acs. in Chucatuck Riv. in the Up. Co. of New Norf., 18 Feb 1638, p. 611. E. by N. upon land of Georg Salsburynow in his possession, S. upon his own land, &c. Due for trans. of 2 persons.

Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part II, Page 129
William Eyres, 750 acs. Up. Norf. Co., May 23 1642, Page 777. Upon an arm of the W. br. of Nansamond River, adj. John Garrett. Trans. of 15 pers.: Francis Spreight, Thomas Birdwell, Robert Atany, Sarah Sanner(?), John Mondy, Walter Besley, John Blackburne, John Bay, William Nichols, William Fenn, Jeremiah Valayne, Edward Thownsend, John Ray, Hugh Rout, Hugh Smithwicke.

William Eyres, 100 ace. Up. Norf. CO., May 22, 1642, Page 778. Upon N. side of the W. br. of Nansamund Riv., adj. John Sculler. Trans. of 2 pers.: Gilbert Brooke. (i name missing) Record incomplete.

But, one source lists his birth place as Nasemond City, Virginia.

One source has: William AYRES died 25 March 1655 Battle of Severn, Anne Arundel County, Maryland. At the Battle of the Severn on 25 March 1655, William AYRES was allegedly the Standard Bearer for the Puritans, and at the beginning of the battle the Standard was fired on, and he was killed. [John Bennett Boddie, *Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia,* (Chicago: Chicago Law Printing Company, 1938).]

Notes for William Ayres

1. Library of Virginia. Land Office Patents & Grants/Northern Neck Grants & Surveys:
GRANTEE Eyres, William. grantee
DATE 1 November 1637.
NOTE Location: Isle of Wight County.
NOTE Description: 150 acres upon the main river, beg.g at a red point that is joining upon a small creek.
NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643 (v.1 & 2), p. 491 (Reel 1).

2. Land Office Patents & Grants/Northern Neck Grants & Surveys :
GRANTEE Eyres, William. grantee.
DATE 1 November 1637.
NOTE Location: Isle of Wight County.
NOTE Description: 150 acres upon the main river. Beg.g at a creek and being an island.
NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643 (v.1 & 2), p. 491 (Reel 1).

3. Land Office Patents & Grants/Northern Neck Grants & Surveys :
GRANTEE Eyres, William. grantee.
DATE 22 May 1642.
NOTE Location: Upper Norfolk County.
NOTE Description: 100 acres upon the northern side of the western branch of Nansamund River.
NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643 (v.1 & 2), p. 778 (Reel 1).

4. Land Office Patents & Grants/Northern Neck Grants & Surveys :
GRANTEE Eyres, William. grantee
DATE 23 May 1642.
NOTE Location: Upper Norfolk County.
NOTE Description: 750 acres upon an arm of the western branch of Nansamund River.
NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643 (v.1 & 2), p. 777 (Reel 1).

5. On 29 Oct. 1651 William AYRES had 600 acres "Ayres" survyed in Anne Arundel Co., MD (Patents Q:99)

6. Information from "Chew Family" by Francis B. Culver in MARYLAND GENEALOGIES.

Came to Maryland with his family before June 1652. On the 5th of October 1653, Mr. William Ayres demands land for transporting himself, Sarah his wife (then deceased), Ann Ayers his daughter, and nine servants before June 1652; and Martha his now wife, and Margaret Sammes, his servant, since June 1652 (Md. Land Office, Liber A.B.H., folio 348). On 6 June 1663, Samuel Chew assigns to Sarah Marsh any rights that remain on record "due to my father-in-law William Ayres" (ibid., Liver V, folios 338,339), and there is upon record at Portsmouth, Va., a power of attorney from "Samuel Chew, Esq., of Herrington, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and Anne his wife sole daughter and heiress of Mr William Ayres late of Nansemond County, Virginia, deceased" (Va. Mag., I.197). (From Frederic Z. Saunders: William AYRES on 5 Oct. 1653 demanded 950 acres of 1550 assigned to him by Caprt. BRENT and Mr. Edward LLOYD, and assinged 600 acres of the 950 to MR. Richard WELLS. He then demanded the 350 left plus 1300 more for transporting himself, Sarah his deceased wife, Ann AYRES his daughter and 9 servants [named] before June 1652, and Martha his now wife and a servant [named] since June 1652 for a total of 1650 acres. He then assigned 500 of the 1650 to Tho: MARSH. (Patents ABH:347-348).

7. Died 25 March 1655 in the Battle of Severn, Anne ArundelCounty, Maryland.

8. William Ayres and his daughter were Quakers.

"Ancestry of Albert Gallatin and Hannah Nicholson with a list of their Descendants to the Second and Third Generation". [Compliled from "Life of Albert Gallatin" by Henry Adams (1879), "History of Nicholson Family" by Byam Kerby Stevens (1911) and other sources - Revised by William Plum Bacon. New York, Press of T.A. Wright, 1916
1
Change Date: 23 Jun 2005 at 16:24:03

Marriage 1 Sarah b: ABT 1608 in of Nansemond, Virginia
Married: ABT 1634 in Nansemond, Virginia
Children
Anne AYRES b: 1635/1645 in of Nansemond, Virginia (probably born England)

Marriage 2 Martha WELLS

Sources:
Title: Patents to William Ayres granted to Ann (Ayres) Chew.
Text: On 29 Oct. 1651 William AYRES had 600 acres *Ayres* survyed in Anne Arundel Co., MD (Patents Q:99)

On 20 April 1653 Thomas MARSH had sold to William AYRES 500 acres of 1000 acres due him by warrant dated 25 Oct. 1651. "Samuel CHEW and Ann CHEW the Daughter and Sole heir of Mr. William AYRES" had sold the 500 acres on 4 July 1657 to Anthony SALWAY. At the same time Anthony SALWAY sold 300 acres of land due William AYRES upon his right entered 5 Oct. 1653. Mr. Anthony SALWAY had married the widow of Mr. William AYRES, and she relinquished all her interest in the same. (Patents Q:195-196) On 27 Aug. 1658 the 600 acres surveyed on 29 Oct. 1651 was granted to "Ann the Daughter and Heire of the said Will. AYRES and now wife to Samuel CHEW." (Patents Q:99-100)

x. Anne Wells
xi. Elizabeth Wells

474. Edward Storer, Jr., born Abt. 1614 in Leicestershire, England; died Jun 1644 in Buckminster, Leicestershire, England. He was the son of 948. Edward Storer and 949. Mary Briggs. He married 475. Mary Widmerpole 31 Oct 1637 in Wysall, Nottinghamshire, England.
475. Mary Widmerpole, died Abt. 1639. She was the daughter of 950. George Widmerpole and 951. Jane Russell.

More About Edward Storer, Jr.:
Burial: 10 Jun 1644, Buckminster, Leicestershire, England
Comment: His name is erroneously listed as Arthur Storer in the biography of his son Arthur and in the Wilkinson genealogy. No information is available on his family as the Lincolnshire records were very incomplete when Isaac Newton's biographers were researching.

Child of Edward Storer and Mary Widmerpole is:
237 i. Ann Storer, born Abt. 1638 in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died Abt. 1714 in "The Reserve, " near present-day Prince Frederick, Calvert County, Maryland USA; married (1) Dr. James Truman Bef. 1656 in England; married (2) Robert Skinner Aft. 1672.

Generation No. 10

800. Etienne Chastain, born in Bourges, France.

More About Etienne Chastain:
Event: 1572, At the time of the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, when many French Huguenots were killed, Etienne and/or his parents were apparently living in Bourges in central France.

Child of Etienne Chastain is:
400 i. Jacques Chastain, born Abt. 1598 in Charost, Berri, France; died Bef. 1675 in Charost, Berri, France; married Jeanne Audet.

904. Thomas Stockett He was the son of 1808. Lewis Stockett and 1809. Lucy Mayland. He married 905. Joan Biggs.
905. Joan Biggs, born in Probably County Kent, England.

Child of Thomas Stockett and Joan Biggs is:
452 i. Thomas Stockett, Jr., born in Probably County Kent, England; died Oct 1638 in St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, County Kent, England; married Frances Ayleworth 1616.

906. Walter Ayleworth, died Abt. 1614 in St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, County Kent, England. He was the son of 1812. John Ayleworth and 1813. Elizabeth Ashton. He married 907. Jane Stockett.
907. Jane Stockett, born in County Kent, England; died Bef. 1630 in Chancel of St. Stephen's Church, Hackington, County Kent, England. She was the daughter of 1808. Lewis Stockett and 1809. Lucy Mayland.

More About Walter Ayleworth:
Burial: Chancel of St. Stephen's Church, Hackington, County Kent, England
Residence: St. Stephen's Parish, Canterbury, County Kent, England

Child of Walter Ayleworth and Jane Stockett is:
453 i. Frances Ayleworth, died Abt. 1648; married Thomas Stockett, Jr. 1616.

910. Robert Whyte? He married 911. Mary Sheldon? 16 Aug 1615 in Hutton, County Essex, England.
911. Mary Sheldon?

Child of Robert Whyte? and Mary Sheldon? is:
455 i. Frances Whyte?, born 18 Jul 1616 in Hutton, County Essex, England; died 19 Sep 1677 in "Downs on the Severn, " Anne Arundel County, Maryland USA; married Dr. Richard Wells.

948. Edward Storer, born Bef. 1598. He was the son of 1896. Arthur Storer. He married 949. Mary Briggs 1613 in Buckminster, Leicestershire, England.
949. Mary Briggs

More About Edward Storer:
Residence: Melton, England

Child of Edward Storer and Mary Briggs is:
474 i. Edward Storer, Jr., born Abt. 1614 in Leicestershire, England; died Jun 1644 in Buckminster, Leicestershire, England; married (1) Mary Widmerpole 31 Oct 1637 in Wysall, Nottinghamshire, England; married (2) Katharine Babington 15 Feb 1641 in Nottinghamshire, England.

950. George Widmerpole, born in Widmerpole, Nottinghamshire, England?; died Abt. 1628. He was the son of 1900. William Widmerpole and 1901. Anne Grimston. He married 951. Jane Russell.
951. Jane Russell She was the daughter of 1902. Fermyn/Firmian Russell and 1903. Ann Brereton.

Children of George Widmerpole and Jane Russell are:
475 i. Mary Widmerpole, died Abt. 1639; married Edward Storer, Jr. 31 Oct 1637 in Wysall, Nottinghamshire, England.
ii. Joseph Widmerpole
iii. George Widmerpole
iv. Margaret Widmerpole
v. Anne Widmerpole
vi. Joane Widmerpole
vii. Thomas Widmerpole, born Abt. 1599.

Generation No. 11

1808. Lewis Stockett, born Abt. 1530 in Hackington, County Kent, England. He married 1809. Lucy Mayland.
1809. Lucy Mayland, born Abt. 1534 in County Kent, England. She was the daughter of 3618. Edward Mayland.

Children of Lewis Stockett and Lucy Mayland are:
904 i. Thomas Stockett, married Joan Biggs.
907 ii. Jane Stockett, born in County Kent, England; died Bef. 1630 in Chancel of St. Stephen's Church, Hackington, County Kent, England; married Walter Ayleworth.

1812. John Ayleworth, died in Gloucestershire, England?. He married 1813. Elizabeth Ashton.
1813. Elizabeth Ashton She was the daughter of 3626. John Ashton.

Notes for John Ayleworth:
Arthur Aylsworth and His Descendants in America

Author: Homer Elhanan Aylsworth, M.D.

Call Number: R929.2 A97

The American descendants of Arthur Aylsworth with historical and genealogical notes from early English records relating to the Aylsworth family.

Bibliographic Information: Arnold, James N. Arthur Aylsworth and His Descendants in America. Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1887.

ENGLISH GENEALOGIES, HERALDIC NOTES

AND HISTORICAL NOTES

THE parentage of Arthur Aylworth is yet unknown to his American descendants, but having in view the possibility of its discovery at some future time, various extracts which have come to notice relating to persons of the name in England are inserted here as of interest and of possible value in the prosecution of an inquiry. Following the plan adhered to throughout this work in all quotations from permanent records, the surname is reproduced with the orthography of the record.

"Sir John Champneys, Kt. married Elizabeth dau. of Sir Hugh Bytton "of Bytton, Co. of Gloucester, Kt. Till this period the chief seat "was Champneys in the parish of Stanton-drew, Co Somerset. To "their son, John Champneys Esq. the Moor was granted as a crest "temp. Henry IV (A. D. 1422-1461.) He married Joanna, dau. of Sir "Humphrey Aylworth, of Aylworth, or Aylesworth, Co. Glocester, Kt." [Berry's County Geneaologies, Kent, page 40

As elsewhere stated, it should be remembered that there were two distinct localities in Gloucestershire, Aylworth and Aldesworth, apparently causing some confusion.

In the second year of his reign (1548) Edward VI. sold chantries, colleges, etc. His book of sales of the same contains a memorandum of the sale of "a mansion and tenement called 'The Mansion-House' of "the College of New-hal in the Mountrey within the city of Wells, etc. "Yearly value 38œ--14s.; purchase 728œ--0s--2d.; purchaser John "Ayleworth and Will Lacye." [Strype's Eccl. Mem. II. Part II. page 405.]

The city of Wells is in Somerset.

"In 1293 the temporalities of the Abbot of Cerne in Remescomb, "were valued at 13œ--15s. 32 Henry VIII (1541) this manor, inter "alia, was granted to Thomas Arundel and his heirs, to be held of the "king in chief, by Knights service. On his attainder, 6 E. VI (1553) "it was granted to John lord Fitzwarren, who, the same year, had "license to alienate this manor and 40 messuges, and 40 gardens, 6400 "acres of land, and 100s rent here, and the advowson of the chapel "value 12œ--9s--4d to John Ailworth and heirs." [Hutchins' History of Dorset.]

"Letters were sent (Dec 9, 1558) to John Aylworth, receiver of the counties of Somerset," etc. [Strype's Annals I., Part I., page 18.]

This was but a few weeks after the accession of Queen Elizabeth, who was prompt to look after the interests of her treasury.

ARMS - Argent a fess engrailed between six
billets gules.

QUARTERINGS. 1 Argent, a mullet sable for
ASHTON.
2 Vert. a fesse, dauncettee,
erm. for SOMERS.
3 Ar, a chev. sa betw. three
periwigs ppr. for HAREMAN.

John Ayleworth, of Co. of Gloucester, Esq. mar. Elizabeth, dau. and heir of (???) Ashton. Issue:

Ashton Ayleworth, eldest son, of London, Esq. mar. Ann Fleetwood.
Walter Ayleworth 2d son. of St. Stephens, Canterbury, mar. Ja
Stokitt.
Anthony Ayleworth, M. D. 3d son, mar. (???) Bayley.
Edward Ayleworth, 6th son. of St. Stephens, Canterbury, Esq. senesch
of the archbishop's liberty, ob. S. P. 1625 't 73, buri
in the chancel of St. Stephen's Church.
William Ayleworth|
John Ayleworth |all S. P.
Robert Ayleworth |
Frances, mar. Sir Thomas Reynall of Co. Devon, Knt.
Elizabeth ob. unmar. [Kentish Genealogies.]
Ashton Ayleworth,(*) mar. Ann, dau. of Thomas Fleetwood of Co. of Bedford. Issue: Thomas Ayleworth of London 1st son, mar. (???) dau. of Edwa
Prideaux. Issue: Ashton Aylworth.
John Ayleworth.

(*)Morant in his Hist. of Essex, describing Utlesford Hundred, Heydon Parish, reters
to this person perhaps, when he says: "Ashton Ayleworth Esq. who died 13 June
1598 held the manor of Haydon of the Queen in capite by the service of the 20th part
of a Knights fee worth 4œ--3s--4d per ann. Thomas was his son and heir
Walter Ayleworth.
Roger Ayleworth.
Joyce Ayleworth.
Grace Ayleworth, mar. Robert Farneby of Co. Lincoln, Esq.
Bridget Ayleworth mar. Sir Thomas Gotts, Knt.
Jane Ayleworth mar. (???) Maypowder of Co. Somerset.
Eliza Ayleworth mar. Sir Thomas Esfield, Knt.

Walter Ayleworth,(*) 2d son of St. Stephens Canterbury, mar. Jane (or Joan), dau. of Lewis Stokett of London of the household of queen Elizabeth. His will was made 1614: ob. 162-, and was buried in the chancel of St. Stephen's church Canterbury. Issue:

Mary.
Elizabeth, mar. John White. He ob. 1635, bu. in the chancel S
Stephens Church in Canterbury. They had Henry Whi
and Joane.
Peter Ayleworth, eldest son, of St. Stephens Canterbury. Will 1630.
Frances, mar. Thomas Stockett of St. Stephens, afterwards of Berkeborn
Will 1638. He was her cousin -- her mother's
brother Thomas' son. They had John, Lewis, Joan, a
Aylworth Stockett. Berry's Gen. gives her name Franc
Aylworth and her father's name Walter Aylworth.
Lucy, m. John Denne, Esq., Barrister at Law, son and heir of Vince
Denne, L. L. D., and grandson of William Denne, of Kingsto
Berry's Gen. says, Lucy dau. of Walter Aylewor
Ailsworth of St. Stephens.

Anthony Ayleworth, M. D., 3d son, mar. (???)dau. of Walter Bayley. They had two sons:

Dr. Martin Aylworth,(+) eldest son.
Anthony Aylworth, 3d son.??

[From Gutch's Antiquities of (New College) Oxford.]

On another stone under the proportion of a man in a doctoral habit are these verses:

(*)Gutch's Antiq, of Oxford speaks of another Walter. "William Compton's
mother Joan who was daughter and sole heir of Walter Aylworth."

(+)"Martin Aylworth born in the dioeese of Oxford, D. C. L., and Fellow, died in this
(All-Souls) College about 12 o'clock at night Jan. 11, 1657-8, and was buried in the
Chapel. He was then about seventy years of age but was never married. He was
the son of Anthony Alyworth Doctor of Physic and sometime the Kings Professor of
Physic in this University, who married as I conceive, the daughter of Dr. Walter
Bayley, sometime the King's Professor of Physic also in this University. See the
Epitaphs of the said Anthony Aylworth and Walter Bayley before in New College
Chapel" [Gutch's Antiq of Oxford.]

??Berry's Hampshire, page 331, says, that Mary dau. of Anthony Ayleworth mar.
Thomas Watson of Stratton in Co. of Gloucester. The Item is without date or further
reference.

HOSPES SISTE GRADUM NUMEROSUM PERLEGE FUNUS,
HIC JACET HIPPOCRATES, HIC AVICENNA JACET.
OSSA DIOSCORODIS SUNT HIC, SUNT OSSA GALENI,
ET SIMUL ALWORTHUM CONTEGIT ISTE LAPIS.
AN TOT CONGESTOS TUMULUM MIRARIS IN UNUM? AT MIRARE MAGIS, NEMPE TOT UNUS ERAT.
QUI TAMEN IN VITA SIMPLEX, UT DICERE POSSIS,
QUOD NEQUE PLUS ULLINEC MINUS ARTIS ERAT.
POSUIT PL' MEMORL' ERGO,
MARTINUS AYLWORTH, FILIUS
NATU MAXIMUS.

On the verge of the stone is this:

HIC JACET ANTONIUS AYLWORTH GENEROSA ET
ANTIQUA FAMILIA IN COMIT. GLOCSTR.
ORIUNDUS, LONDINI NATUS IN SCHOLA
WINTONIENSI LIBERALITER EDUCATUS,
HUJUS COLLEGII QUONDAM SOCIUS
MEDICIN' DOCTOR ET PROFESSOR REGIUS
SUB ELIZAB. REG. PER ANNOS CIRCITER
XV. VIR EXIMIA PIETATE, VIRTUTE,
ERUDITIONE, SANIS, DUM VIXIT, JUXTA
ET 'GROTIS CHARUS: EXACTO DEMUM
LXXV ANNORUM CURRICULO, DUOBUS
FILIIS, MARTINO ET ANTONIO SUPERSTITIB
FELICITER IN DOMINO OBDORMIVIT XVIII DIE
APRIL, AN. DOM. MDCXIX.

Translation of the Aylworth stone:

Stranger, pause and read [the story of] this manifold deat
Here lies Hippocrates: here Avicenna lies.
Here rest the bones of Dioscorides and those of Galen.
And in their company this stone covers Aylworth.
Do you wonder that to one tomb so many have been brought?
Yet more amazed be ye for one [there lived who] was all thes
Who nevertheless in [mode of] life was simple, as you cou
[will] say
Since in no one was there [ever] either more or less of art.(*) Erected in filial remembrance by Martin Aylworth his eldest son.

(*)More of the "art" of healing, or less of "art" fuiness.

Here lies Antony Aylworth descended from an eminent and ancient family in the County of Gloucester, born in London, liberally educated in the school of Winton, sometime a fellow of this college(*) a Doctor of Medicine and Regius(+) Professor under Queen Elizabeth for about fifteen years, a man of piety virtue and learning, equally dear while living to those in health and those in sickness: when at length the period of seventy-two years had been completed on the eighteenth day of April in the year of our Lord 1619, he peacefully fell asleep in the Lord, leaving [to mourn his loss] two sons Martin and Antony.

"Aylworth of Tackley, Co. of Oxford.

ARMS QUARTERLY--1. Argent, a fess engrailed between six billet gul
[AYLWORTH].
2. Azure, a fess argent beween three garbs o
[NOWERS].
3. Argent, three rams lying down sable horn
[ONLEY].
4. On an inescutcheon within an orle of Cinquefoi
a crescent [DARCY] impaling azu
chevron between three griflins heads eras
or [GOWER]" Visitations 1566 and 1574.

"Peter Aylworth of Takley in Com. of Oxen. gen. second sonne to Anthony, marryed Anne, daughter to Willm. Gower, of Woodhall in Com. Wigorn, gent., and by her hath yssue Thomas Aylworth, his eldest son ane heir apparent; Willm. second sonne; Elizabeth now 4 years of age." [Harleian Sec. V--216, page 8.]

Note to the above: "On the north wall of the chancell of Tackley Church this cut in stone: 'Here lyeth the body of Peter Aylworth Esqr., once Ld. of this mannour, and Anne his wife, the daughter of Will. Gower of Woodhall. He deceased in the year MDCXI, (1611). This done by his son Marke.' Over it is a fess engrailed quarterly (1) a fess between three garbes, (NOWERS). 2 Three stags lodging. (3) Sem‚e of five foyles and an escocheon, impaling, GOWER, viz. a chevron between three wolves' heads erased (all without colours). Und. the said Mon. is a raised monument of stone. Wood, E. I. p. 110."

On page 53 will be found a much full description of the arms found "in Mr. Aylworthe's house at Tackley." In the remarks which follow and in quotation from Wood's MS. E. I., p. 103, it is stated that "George Nowers Knight ob. Ao MCCCXXV."

" * * * And then chose (Sept. 5, 1683,) Mr. deputy Ailworth
(*)New College, Oxford.

(+)By royal appointment.

Page 26

Chamberlain of London, in the room of Sir Thomas Player, who laid down." [Luttrell, State Affairs, Vol. I. p. 278.] "Sir Peter Aylworth chamberlain of London (Dec. 3, 1685) being lately dead, his majestie hath constituted Peter Rich Esqr., alderman, in his stead." [Ib. p. 323.]

Thomas More died in 16??5. He was a writer as early as 1641. In his life given in Athen' Oxonienses, Vol. 4, occurs the following:

"But the puritanical rebellion breaking out soon after, he took up arms for the parliament, became a gent. of the guard to Robert Earl of Essex the general of the forces belonging to the said parliament, took the covenant, and was made lieutenant of a troop of horse belonging to Capt. Richard Aylworth under the command of Col. Edward Massie."

In the life of Anthony A'Wood, author of Athen' Oxonienses, occurs the following:

"Sunday (June 28, 1585,) after dinner, the University troop headed by Dr. Ailworth, chanc. of the diocese, went seven miles from Oxen. to meet and conduct thereto 4 loads of muskets, pikes, &c. for the scholars to train with. There appeared 60 horse divided into two bodies. They came in at 7 o'clock at night. Of the said troop the E. of Abendon was captain, Dr. Aylworth before mentioned was lieutenant, Dr. Clutterbuck of All-Souls cornet. But I saw no colours they had."

This refers to Henry Aylworth, D. C. L.

"Humphry Aylworth S. T. B. Vicar Church of St. Marys, towne or port of Sandwich Rent, April 12, 1597."

"Humphry Aylworth, (S. T. B., refig, 1601), rector Church of St. Michael, Harbledowne, Westgate Hundred, County Kent, in 1601." [Hastid's Hist. of Kent.]

Frances Aylworth, Kyneton in Co. Warwick, 20 Elizabeth,--1577-78.

Morant's Essex, describing Melescham, alias Mulsham-hall, says:

"* * * Of this Lord (William Blount, Lord Montjoy) they were purchased by Thomas Denny Esq: at the request of William Aylworth of Chelmsford. And a common recovery passed in Michaelmass-term, 1522, by Thomas Dennye, and William Aylworth against Sir William Blount Lord Montjoy, of the maners of Mulshams, Brayhams, and Warrokys, with appertenances, and 10 messuages, 1000 acres of arable, 40 of meadow, 800 of pasture, 400 of wood, and 300 acres of more in Great and Little Leighes, Black Notele, Fayrestede, and Felsted. Oct. 2, 1531, these estates were purchased of Aylworth by William Walsingham, Esq., etc."

John Gunter of Raclon, Co. Sussex, and of Gilleston, in Wales, ob. 1557 Ing, p. m. mar. Jane, dau. and heir of Henry Aylworth of Co. of Wilts. 1st wife. [Berry's Sussex]

Extract from Widdowe Ayleworth's will 1636 Co. Buckingham: "I give to my brother John Ive my two houses at Burnham Townes Ende: and out of those 2 houses I give to the poore of Burnham 20s a year
and 6s. 8d. for a sermon, at the day of my buriall (which was St. Johns day at Christmas) [27 Dec.] or the Sunday followinge after, during (sic) the Worldes Ende. And for want of payment of the 20s. and the 6s 8d thus it shall be lawfull for the churchwardens and overseers to enter upon the said houses &c. Concordat cum originali Ita testor JOHANNEL WRYGHT, vicar de Burnham." [Collectanea Topographica and Genealogica, Vol. 4, p. 284]

Extract from parish register of Croydon, Surry:

"Thomas Aylworth, gent. wounded the xvii day of May, lay long languishinge under the hands of surgeons into the xx day of June and then dyed and was buried the xxi day 1515 in the middle chancell in Croydon churche."

Note to the above: "The arms of Edward Aylworth Esq., probably his father, were formerly in one of the windows in the hall of Archbishop Whitgift's Hospital. See Steinman's Hist. of Croydon, p. 68." [Coll. Top. and Gen., Vol. 2, p. 295.]

Abstract of the will of William Ailworth, Gent.:

William Ailworth, of Gomonly, als. Gumly, in the County of Leicr. Gent. to be buried in the Church of Gumly. To Willm. Underwood of Artlingborough in the County of Northton Yeoman, my nephew and godson, & to his heirs forever, all that my mannour of Gomonly als. Gumly, with the appertenaces &c whatsoever in the countyes of Leicester & Northampton.

To Susanna my wife ten pounds yearly. My executor shall find, provide, & allowe to & for my said wife during her life in my dwelling house at Gumly aforsd competent and sufficient meat, drink, lodging, washing, fire, candle, and other necessaries as well in sickness as in health, & convenient for a person of her age, degree, and calling; all of which I devise unto her in lieu and recompense of such dower &c. To every of the brothers & sisters & William Underwood five pounds apiece."

He then gives "yearly forever" œ20 to the support of each of four free schools at Little Harrowden, Pitchley, Atlingborough, and Halloughton, "the masters of every of the schools to be at the time of election a Graduate of one of the two Universities of Oxford or Cambridge, of a sober, peaceable, and discrete behavior," etc. Also says: "My executor and his heirs shall forever have the nomination and election of all the said schoolmasters." The will was made 10 Aug. 1661. [See Collec., Topog. and Geneal., Vol. III. p. 330.]

Thus far there has been found but one description of arms, (already given incidentally), so Guillim says in a general form: "Ho beareth Argent, a Fesse engrailed between six Billets Gules: by the name of Aylworth." Nichols' Hist. Leicestershire, West Goscote Hundred, gives same, as also Gilbert, in his Historical Survey of Co. of Cornwall, and other authors. Washbourne and Fairbairn both have a description of the Aylworth crest--an arm vested sa. out of rays, or, in hand ppr. a human skull. It is referred to Somerset, Gloucester, Kent, and Devonshire.

The following references to Harleian Collection, British Museum, London, Eng., may be of service for future inquiry:

Aleworth, Bedfodshire, 2109, fo. 92b.
Aleworth, Berkshire, add MS. 4960, fo. 92.
Aleworth of West Hamney, Berkshire from Co. Oxford, 1483, f
113b. -- 1530, fo. 68 -- add MS. 14, 284, p. 9
Ayleworth of Polslow, 1538, fo. 4. Coat of Arms, Devonshir
Ayleworth of Ayleworth, 1041, fo. 116b. -- 1543, fo. 55b. Gloucestershire.
Ayleworth of St. Stephens, Co. Kent, from Co. Gloucester, 110
fo. 168b. -- 1432, fo. 28b. -- add MSS. 5507, p. 3
5526, p. 352.
Ayieworth of Canterbury, Co. Kent, Coat of Arms, 1548, f
4108, fo. 64 -- add MSS. 14307, fo. 1 -- 16279, p. 8
Aylworth of Tackley, Co. of Oxford, from Co. of Glouceste
808, fo. 21b.--1556, ff. 82-102--5187, fo. 27.
Ayleworth of Kinston, Warwickshire, 1563, fo. 1, Coat of Arms.

AMERICAN TRADITIONS.

BESIDES Arthur Aylworth, of North Kingstown, R. I., there are early traces of but few persons of the name on this side of the Atlantic. Robert Aleworth, Pemaquid, 1631. [Farmer's Register.]

Francis Aleworth, Dorchester, freeman, May 15, 1631, was chosen lieutenant at a court of Assistants, [Prince ii., Annals 32], but returned to England in March, 1632. At the court in March, 1631, another man with this surname was ordered to go "as unmeet to inhabit here." [See Farmer's Reg. and Savage's Gen. Dict.]

Ffrancis Aleworth took the frceman's oath in Boston, May 14, 1634. [New Eng. Hist. and Gen. Reg.]

Edward Aleworth (or Aldworth), aged 13, embarked on the ship Freelove in London for Bormoodes. June 10, 1635. Elizabeth Aldworth, aged 15, embarked the next year in London for the same destination, where Bartho Aldsworth owned a plantation and slaves, about 1680.

This name is found in the States. Alfred Aldsworth, who, at the time of his death, resided in Williamsburg, and was engaged in mercantile business, mar. June, 1835, Eliza Van Brunt, b. Feb. 26, 1831, d. July 5, 1851. Their children were, Albert Van B. Aldsworth, Eliza Ann. William Henry, Matilda, and Alfred. We have already seen that there was a family seat in Gloucestershire, Eng., spelled Aldesworth. This fact raises a presumption that the Aldsworths originated there.

Jeremiah Ellsworth, Rowley, 1650, m. 2 Dec. 1657, Mary, widow of Hugh Smith, and died 6 May, 1704. [Savage' Gen. Dict]

Christopher Elsworth, New York, as early as 1653. Eldest child born 165

Thomas E. Alesworth, b. Sept. 22, 1800, mar. April 18, 1822, Margaret Gibson, in Cumberland Co., Pa. His parentange is unknown to his descendants. One account is that his father emigrated from England, remained in this country, near Philadelphia, several years, where Thomas E. was born, and then returned to England with all his family excepting Thomas E. [Wm. B. Butler.] Another statement is that Thomas E. Alesworth went to Cumberland Co, Pa., from some part of the State of New York. [Josiah F. Ellsworth.] Thomas E. Alesworth was a local preacher in the M. E. Church, and died July 31, 1832. Margaret Gibson was dau. of John and Margaret (Reynolds) Gibson, of Franklin Co., Pa. Their family consisted of five children:

Elizabeth M., b. April 17, 1823, m. March 3, 1842, James E. Coa
res. Carlisle, Pa.
John Wesley, b. March 16, 1825, (bachelor), P. O., Slacks Canyo
Cal.
Josiah F., b. July 18, 1827, m. (???), dw. Williamsburg, Pa.
Charles Brewster, b. July 17, 1829, m. July 29, 1851, Rebecca Wilso
res. Johnstown, Pa.
Harriet, b. July 26, 1831, d. Nov. 2, 1854, Ottumwa, Iowa.

After his death, his widow married John M. Butler, who died March 3, 1874.

Charles B. Alesworth remembers that his mother told him that his father lived in or near Philadelphia, and that his ancestors were English.

John W. Alesworth says his father was a carpenter by trade, but that he never followed it for a business; that he was a school teacher at the time of his marriage; that he was also a Methodist preacher for a time, and a Presbyterian as to doctrinal preferences; that he thinks he withdrew from the Baltimore Conference and only preached occasionally while engaged in the saw-mill business.

The descendants of Arthur Aylworth may never learn the trans-Atlantic family history of their ancestor. At present they have no positive information respecting his English home. They desire, however, no doubt to learn the known and also the probable facts of his history. Keeping as far as possible from theories, purely speculative, the account presented in these pages has been prepared under the indulgence of a faint hope that something may yet be ascertained that will determine his English ancestry.

Arthur Aylworth was living in the Narragansett country July 29, 1679. He wrote his name as here given. The surname has been brought down to the present time in this form, which form was not uncommon in England at the date here given.

The Register states that he was a Welshman, born in England. Traditions respecting the matter are, as usual, somewhat conflicting. One says he was of Welsh descent; another that he was of English ancestry; another that he came from England near the border of Wales; another that he came from Monmouthshire, while from many sources we are told he came from the west of England. Abel Aylsworth, of Arlington, Vt., was born in West Greenwich, R. I., in 1745, where he remained until he was about thirty years of age. He died in 1830, in his 86th year. The following statement made by him in 1824 was committed to writing at the time by Judiah, son of Frederick:

Arthur Aylsworth lived with narrator's father, and died at his house in West Greenwich, R. I., in July, 1760; he was narrator's grandfather, and died when he was 76 years old. Narrator was named Abel by his grandmother, called Aunt Mary, the wife of Arthur, and was so named for her brother, Abel Franklin, the uncle of Benjamin Franklin.

The brothers of Arthur Aylsworth were:

Robert, who lived at Exeter, south of West Greenwich.
John, lived in same town and died at his son-in-law's hous
Rathbun.
Judiah, lived in Scituate, R. I.
Philip, lived at Quid Nesick Neck.
Children of Arthur Aylsworth and Mary Franklin:

Philip, small man.
David, tall man, full six feet.
James.
John.
Judiah, short, thick-set man.
Freelove, tall, spare, married Tenant.
Austis, tall, very fleshy, married Colvin.
Demis, married Phillips; 2d husband Travis.
Barbara, short, married Jonathan Hill.
Judiah, married Ruth Draper, daughter of Thomas Draper. Children:

Abel, the narrator, small-sized man; was an ensign in Warner
Regt., and went to Quebec with General Montgome
1776.
Molly, middling size, married Abel Parker.
Lydia, short woman, married Thomas Gordon.
Arthur, short, stout man; soldier in Revolution.
Christian, tall and fleshy, married (???) Harris.
Judiah, small man.
Stephen, slim and tall; soldier in Revolution.
Ruth, tall and large, married Budlong.
Judiah married for his second wife Rosanna Stafford, daughter of Jonathan Edwards, and widow of Stukely Stafford. Children:

Wanton, large man, more than common size.
Perry Greene, short, chunked man.
Stukely, large man, florid complexion.
John, large, stout man.

Children of John Ayleworth and Elizabeth Ashton are:
906 i. Walter Ayleworth, died Abt. 1614 in St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, County Kent, England; married Jane Stockett.
ii. Ashton Ayleworth, married Ann Fleetwood.

More About Ashton Ayleworth:
Residence: London, England

iii. Anthony Ayleworth
iv. William Ayleworth
v. John Ayleworth
vi. Robert Ayleworth
vii. Edward Ayleworth, born Abt. 1572; died 12 Sep 1625.

Notes for Edward Ayleworth:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=25491767

Edward Aylworth was the sixth son of John Aylworth (a Member of Parliament who died in 1575) and his wife Elizabeth Ashton. Edward served as High Steward to George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury. The inscription on the memorial panel for him in St. Stephen's church reads:

"Fratres in Vnvm
Edward Aylworth Esqvire High Steward
to ye liberties of George Lord Archb. of Cant.
He died ye xij of September 1625
Anno Etatis sve 73."

In his will, he wrote, "And when I shalbe deade and buried in the place I have appointed, I will have my Executors make for me a little Table of well-sesoned oken board such as I made for my Brother Walter just of that bignes and proportion onely with my armes fairly painted thereupon with the difference of a sixt Brother as indeed I was and thus subscribed in letters of gould Edward Aylworth Esquire high steward fo the Liberties of George Lord Archibishop of Canterbury. And the same to be sett close under that of my Brothers with some such Compartements of Blacke as is about his and no more adoe But that I will also have over that of my Brothers to be faire written in letters of gould: Brothers in one, for indeed we were an therefore I am well content to publish it so now to the world with whose joyes I hope I shall now have part. And expect my other friends that heere remaine til they come. Today you will be with me."

(Quoted from "The Arms and Ancestry of the Stocketts of Maryland," by Judge James Duvall Trabue.)

More About Edward Ayleworth:
Burial: St. Stephen Churchyard, Hackington, Canterbury, County Kent, England

viii. Frances Ayleworth, married Sir Thomas Reynall.

More About Sir Thomas Reynall:
Residence: Devonshire, England

ix. Elizabeth Ayleworth

1896. Arthur Storer, died 11 Feb 1638.

Child of Arthur Storer is:
948 i. Edward Storer, born Bef. 1598; married Mary Briggs 1613 in Buckminster, Leicestershire, England.

1900. William Widmerpole He was the son of 3800. Edward Widmerpole and 3801. Dorothy Danby. He married 1901. Anne Grimston.
1901. Anne Grimston

Child of William Widmerpole and Anne Grimston is:
950 i. George Widmerpole, born in Widmerpole, Nottinghamshire, England?; died Abt. 1628; married Jane Russell.

1902. Fermyn/Firmian Russell He was the son of 3804. Robert Russell and 3805. ? Salisbury. He married 1903. Ann Brereton.
1903. Ann Brereton, born in Malpas, Cheshire, England?.

More About Fermyn/Firmian Russell:
Residence: Towcester, Northamptonshire, England

Children of Fermyn/Firmian Russell and Ann Brereton are:
951 i. Jane Russell, married George Widmerpole.
ii. William Russell
iii. Joan Russell
iv. Thomas Russell
v. Elizabeth Russell

Generation No. 12

3618. Edward Mayland

Child of Edward Mayland is:
1809 i. Lucy Mayland, born Abt. 1534 in County Kent, England; married Lewis Stockett.

3626. John Ashton

Child of John Ashton is:
1813 i. Elizabeth Ashton, married John Ayleworth.

3800. Edward Widmerpole He was the son of 7600. John Widmerpole. He married 3801. Dorothy Danby.
3801. Dorothy Danby

More About Edward Widmerpole:
Residence: Widmerpole, Nottinghamshire, England

Child of Edward Widmerpole and Dorothy Danby is:
1900 i. William Widmerpole, married Anne Grimston.

3804. Robert Russell He was the son of 7608. Robert Russell. He married 3805. ? Salisbury.
3805. ? Salisbury

More About Robert Russell:
Residence: Steventon, Bedfordshire, England

Child of Robert Russell and ? Salisbury is:
1902 i. Fermyn/Firmian Russell, married Ann Brereton.

Generation No. 13

7600. John Widmerpole

More About John Widmerpole:
Residence: Widmerpole, Nottinghamshire, England

Child of John Widmerpole is:
3800 i. Edward Widmerpole, married Dorothy Danby.

7608. Robert Russell

More About Robert Russell:
Residence: Steventon, Bedfordshire, England

Child of Robert Russell is:
3804 i. Robert Russell, married ? Salisbury.

Ancestors of Jesse Powers Overstreet

Generation No. 1

1. Jesse Powers Overstreet, born 18 Dec 1838 in Bedford Co., VA or Montgomery Co., VA; died 08 Jan 1924 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 2. Littleberry Overstreet and 3. Mildred Witt. He married (1) Mary Jane Warner 24 Feb 1862 in Bedford Co., VA. She was born 08 Sep 1841 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA, and died 19 Sep 1922 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of Jacob Warner and Sarah Updike.

More About Jesse Powers Overstreet:
Date born 2: 18 Dec 1837
Burial: Overstreet-Crowder-Foster plot on Rt. 24 near Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA
Cause of Death: mitral regurgitation
Census 1: 09 Jul 1870, Otter Township, Bedford Co., VA. Value of personal estate $190. Neighbors were Sarah Warner (mother-in-law), Thomas and Elizabeth Updike Shepherd (wife's aunt), Reason and Susan Mayhew, Littleberry and Mildred Overstreet (parents), etc.
Census 2: 15 Aug 1860, Apparently had left his parents' household in Tazewell Co., VA and returned to Bedford by this time, as he was listed as J.P. Overstreet, age 23, as a farmhand in the household of Jno. H. Franklin, age 34, in Southern Revenue District of Bedford Co., VA
Comment: 1860, In the 1860 census of Southern Revenue District, Bedford Co., VA, he is listed in the household of Jno. H. Franklin, and one household down is listed that of Thomas A. Oversteeet, age 27, probably the son of Archibald Oversteet and Polly Crouch.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Baptist-member of Quaker Baptist Church, Bedford Co., VA
Event: 10 May 1904, Applied for a Confederate pension on account of disabilities caused by a hernia and chronic bronchitis. Dr. J.T. Rucker signed the application, and Jesse signed his own name.
Military 1: Civil War-Private-Company G, 28th Regiment, VA Infantry, Confederate States Army; enlisted 27 Apr 1861, discharged 30 Dec 1861 by medical board.
Military 2: According to his grandson, Theo Ernest Williamson (1914-2005 ) of Newport News, VA, Jesse was shot in the Civil War and the bullet is preserved by a descendant
Military 3: 22 Oct 1864, He is probably the J.P. Overstreet who enlisted at Liberty this date, a second tour of duty, for in an 1888 pension application, he stated he was wounded 30 Mar 1865 in the Battle of Hatchers Run outside Petersburg, VA, shot in his shoulder.
Occupation: Farmer
Residence 1: Bef. 1860, Raised in Montgomery Co. and Tazewell Co., VA where his parents lived prior to returning to Bedford. According to the death certificate of his son Zone, Jesse was born in Montgomery County, but Jesse's death certificate says he was born in Bedford County.
Residence 2: Aft. 1860, Present-day Rt. 24 1.5 miles W of Rt. 732, Bedford Co., VA

Notes for Mary Jane Warner:
The following is Mary's obituary from the "Bedford Bulletin-Democrat":

On September 19th, at noon, the death angel visited the home of Mr. Jesse P. Overstreet, near Chestnut Fork, and claimed for its victim the beloved wife and mother, Mary Jane Overstreet. She had been in declining health for several months, but was able to discharge the lighter household duties most of the time, but on Saturday morning, the 16th, at 4 o'clock, she suffered a stroke of paralysis, and from that time grew rapidly worse until the end came. Mrs. Overstreet was 81 years old and during her long life in this county and community earned the love and veneration of her neighbors and others with whom she came in contact. She is survived by her husband, one son, Mr. B.Z. Overstreet, and three daughters, Mrs. H.L. [Malissa] Foster, Mrs. R.E. [Fannie] Williamson, and Mrs. M.H. [Mildred] Crowder; also by one sister, Mrs. W.S. [Lee] Mayhew, and by thirty grandchildren and thirty great-grandchildren.
She was a member of Wilson Methodist Church, and was a devoted wife and mother and grandmother, and a kind and obliging neighbor. One of her greatest pleasures in life was to help the needy, and especially in cases of illness she was a welcome visitor, carrying as she always did and encouraging and cheerful word, some small gift, and the willingness to do what she could to relieve those in distress. She had a kind, loving disposition, and is greatly missed in her home and community.
She was laid to rest in the family cemetery near her home, the funeral being conducted by her pastor, Rev. J.D. Burford, in the presence of a large assembly of sorrowing friends and loved ones; her grave was covered with beautiful flowers, tributes from her multitude of friends. May God's richest blessing rest upon the aged and grief-stricken husband and children.
BERTA [Berta Lillie Mayhew, her niece]

More About Mary Jane Warner:
Burial: Overstreet-Crowder-Foster plot on Rt. 24 near Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA
Cause of Death: apoplexy
Comment: Her father was a Revolutionary soldier and her husband was a Civil War soldier! Her father was 79 years old when she was born.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Methodist-member of Wilson's United Methodist Church, Bedford Co., VA
Residence: Farm on south side of present Rt. 24 (across from cemetery) in Bedford Co., VA

Generation No. 2

2. Littleberry Overstreet, born Abt. 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; died Jul 1880 in Staunton River District, Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 4. Jesse Overstreet and 5. Elizabeth Gordon. He married 3. Mildred Witt 12 Dec 1836 in Bedford Co., VA.
3. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; died 18 Jul 1872 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 6. Rowland Witt and 7. Sarah Duvall.

Notes for Littleberry Overstreet:
From: [emailprotected]
Subject: Interesting observations about the Overstreet name dying out in the Littleberry Overstreet branch and why my Cousin Errin is unique in my family
Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2010 11:58:56 -0500

It's long been remarked in the immediate family of my great-grandfather, Herbert Colon Overstreet (1885-1967) , that my first cousin, Errin Michael Overstreet of near Atlanta, GA, age 34 and unmarried, is the only great-grandchild of Herbert and Bessie carrying the Overstreet name, even though my grandfather Ray had three brothers (and four sisters). Granddad's brother Cecil only had one daughter, his brother Bernard only had one son who has no children, and his brother Rudolph only had two daughters.

A couple of weeks ago, I discovered that my third cousin, Drew Overstreet of Kentucky, has a genealogy website, mainly for the Woodford side of his family because they have reunions every year. So I called him and told him I have lots of information on his dad's entire ancestry. Drew is a grandson of my grandfather's double first cousin, W. Earl Overstreet. He has two daughters and one son, who is the only great-great-grandson of my great-grandfather's brother, Leffie Overstreet, carrying the Overstreet name.

In spite of the fact that my great-grandfather's parents, Berry Zone Overstreet (1863-1934) and Lucy Cheek Overstreet (1861-1958) , had two daughters and seven sons, it appears my Cousin Errin and Drew's 12-year-old son Jonathan Daniel Overstreet are among the few carrying the Overstreet name among Zone and Lucy's descendants. Uncle Howard's only surviving son Melvin did not have children, Uncle Jim had no children, Uncle Luther died childless at age 18, and Uncle Delbert's only son Berry only has one daughter. As for Uncle Otey, his son Luther only had one daughter, his son Mahlon had two sons, his son Winston has two children but if I recall they are both adopted (correct me Dave if that is wrong and only one of them is adopted), and his son Woodie had two sons and three daughters. Woodie's son Dave has no children, and his son W.S. Jr. has six children, but only one son who died as an infant. Mahlon's son Wayne has a 34-year-old son named Travis Wayne Overstreet, Jr., and I don't know his situation. Mahlon's deceased son Keith had a son Eric who apparently changed his name after his parents' divorce.

So correct me if I am wrong (Dave, you'd be the best one to know about the Otey Overstreet branch), but it appears that my first cousin Errin Michael Overstreet, and my third cousins Michael Drewry Overstreet, Jr. and Travis Wayne Overstreet, Jr. are the only biological great-great-grandsons of B. Zone and Lucy Cheek Overstreet carrying the Overstreet name. And I currently have 91 great-great-grandchildren listed for them in my database, though this is probably much outdated since most of my information comes from the Updike book that was written 25 years ago (though most in my generation had been born by that time but another generation has been born since then). Moreover, because my great-great-grandfather Zone was the only son of his parents, Jesse Powers Overstreet (1838-1924) and Mary Jane Warner Overstreet (1841-1922), who had three daughters after they had him, this means that Errin, Drew, and Travis are the only great-great-great-grandchildren of Jesse and Mary carrying the Overstreet name (out of 150 in my database). Dave, does Travis go by Travis or by Wayne like his dad? Does he have children? [Yes, he has a son named Gavin

It appears that Jesse Powers Overstreet's parents, Littleberry Overstreet (1810?-1880) and Mildred Witt Overstreet (1812?-1872), had six children, but I have been unable to determine what became of those who lived to childbearing age and whether any besides Jesse had children. All but two, Jesse and Addison, were daughters however, and I have been unable to determine what became of Addison, who was about 22 years younger than his brother Jesse.

However, Littleberry's parents, Jesse Overstreet (died in Norfolk, VA in 1814 during the War of 1812) and Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet (1791-1889), who interestingly enough was still living when my great-grandfather Herbert, her great-great-grandson, was born, had at least three other sons besides Littleberry, and the male line has been prolific among them. And Jesse's parents, Thomas Overstreet, Jr. (1744-1842) and Barsheba Turner Overstreet (?-ca. 1825), had 14 children besides Jesse, most of whom were sons whose male lineages have been prolific. And the farthest back that we can prove our lineage is to Thomas, Jr's parents, Thomas Overstreet, Sr. (?-ca. 1791) and Agnes ? Overstreet, who came from Orange Co., VA to Bedford County about 1755 and who had two other sons besides Thomas, Jr.: William, who went to Tennessee, and John, who went to Illinois.

The Overstreets in Bedford County descend from either Thomas Overstreet, Sr., who settled on the south side of the county around 1755, or a James Overstreet, who came from Goochland Co., VA and settled in the north side in the 1700s also. We do not know how Thomas and James were related, but the YDNA of their descendants matches and proves they were related. More than likely they were first cousins once removed and both were probably descended from a James Overstreet who settled in King and Queen Co., VA by the 1680s and died after 1703. James was probably our immigrant ancestor, as shown by YDNA test results from several other Overstreets whose families originated there.

Even for those uninterested in genealogy, I hope this is a good summary of the Overstreet lineage and how interesting it is that a male line can become extinct easily even if people have lots of other descendants. ...

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Comments by Bryan S. Godfrey:

Previously it has been assumed by several Overstreet researchers, including me, that Addison was a son and the youngest child of Littleberry Overstreet and Mildred Witt, simply because he appears in their household in census records. However, in the 1880 Bedford Co., VA Census, he is listed as a son, age 20, in the household of Bettie Overstreet, age 35. Her sister Martha was also listed in her household. Because both were listed in the Littleberry Overstreet household in previous census records, it would appear that Elizabeth AKA Bettie was a daughter of Littleberry and Mildred, and that Addison was her son and their grandson, probably an illegitimate son. In the 1880 census, Bettie is listed as a widow, which may have been a falsehood fabricated to hide the shame of being an unwed mother in those days. Because Mildred would have been about 48-50 years old when Addison was born, that also gives credence to him being her grandson rather than her son. It is not known what became of him or his mother Bettie after the 1880 Census.

Therefore, it appears that my great-great-great-grandfather, Jesse Powers Overstreet, was the only son of Littleberry Overstreet and Mildred Witt.

James and Mildred Overstreet and his daughter Missouri were listed next to Bettie's household in the 1880 Census. James was her uncle, a brother of Littleberry Overstreet. Bettie's brother Jesse and his wife Mary Overstreet, and their children Zone, Mildred, Fannie, and Lissie, were listed two more households up from them but on the preceding page. Six households down the page was listed William Updike and his son Nathan (William being the father of Mildred Updike who married James Overstreet), and just below them was listed Amon Updike, his wife Isabella, and their children.

Littleberry, Mildred, and their children left Bedford County for a time and then returned by the 1870 Census, for they are listed in Montgomery County, Virginia in the 1850 Census and in Tazewell County, Virginia in the 1860 Census. His mother, Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet, appears to have had a sister, Nancy Gordon, who married Braxton Bailey, and they too settled in Montgomery County. Nancy settled in Knox County, Tennessee, with at least two daughters, after Braxton's death. The Baileys and Overstreets were both living in District 41 in Montgomery County in the 1850 Census, yet they were not neighbors, for they were listed about ten pages apart from one another.

More About Littleberry Overstreet:
Census 1: 1850, Montgomery Co., VA--listed as a white laborer, born in Virginia, age 40, with wife Mildred age 39 and children Jesse Powers (13), Eliza Ann (11), Mary A. (9), Sarah J. (8), Martha K. (5).
Census 2: 1860, Listed in Eastern District of Tazewell Co., VA, age 50, as a farm laborer, value of personal estate $40, with wife Mildred, age 50, and assumed daughters Martha, Mary, and Elisabeth. Addison was also listedas age 1, who was probably Elizabeth's son.
Census 3: 08 Jul 1870, Listed in Otter District, Bedford Co., VA, age 60, with wife Mildred, age 60, assumed daughter Betsy A., age 31, assumed daughter Martha W., age 24, and assumed grandson Addison, age 10. Listed next to brother James and 3 households away from son Jesse.
Comment: Nothing currently known about fate of children besides Jesse-1 died young
Nickname: Berry
Occupation: Farmer
Residence: Aft. 1836, Moved from Bedford Co. to Montgomery Co., VA; was listed in the 1850 Census in Montgomery County; listed in Tazewell Co., VA in 1860 Census; returned to Bedford Co., VA before the 1870 Census where he is listed in 1870 and 1880.

More About Mildred Witt:
Cause of Death: heart disease
Nickname: Millie
Residence: Bedford Co., VA; Montgomery Co., VA; Bedford Co., VA

Children of Littleberry Overstreet and Mildred Witt are:
1 i. Jesse Powers Overstreet, born 18 Dec 1838 in Bedford Co., VA or Montgomery Co., VA; died 08 Jan 1924 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Jane Warner 24 Feb 1862 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. Elizabeth Ann Overstreet, born Abt. 1839 in Montgomery Co., VA?; died 08 Jan 1908 in Roanoke, VA; married Tracey Overstreet?.

Notes for Elizabeth Ann Overstreet:
From "Bedford Democrat," Volume 24, Number 40, 23 January 1908:

Death of a Former Bedford Lady

Mrs. Bettie A. Overstreet died at the residence of Mrs. Fannie Luck, her granddaughter, 421 Rutherford avenue, Roanoke, Jan. 8th after an illness of only a short time. Grandma Overstreet, as she was best known to her Roanoke friends, was loved and respected by every one who knew her. She was for many years a devout Christian lady being a member of the Methodist church. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Dogan.

Mrs. Overstreet is survived by one brother, Mr. Jesse Overstreet of Bedford county. She was aged 69 years and was the great grandmother of the quadruplets born to Mrs. Luck Dec. 24th, 1907.

More About Elizabeth Ann Overstreet:
Census: 1870, Apparently unmarried in 1870 at age 31 as she is listed as Betsy A. Overstreet in her parents' household in Bedford Co., VA
Comment: According to her son's marriage record, his father was Tracey Overstreet, mother Betsy Ann Overstreet, but more than likely, he was out of wedlock and the listing of his father was intended to conceal that. No Tracy Overstreets have been found at that time
Nickname: Bettie

iii. Mary A. Overstreet, born Abt. 1841 in Montgomery Co., VA?.
iv. Sarah Jane Overstreet, born Abt. 1842 in Montgomery Co., VA?; died Abt. 1850 in Montgomery Co., VA.
v. Martha K. Overstreet, born Abt. 1845 in Montgomery Co., VA?.

Generation No. 3

4. Jesse Overstreet, born Bef. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died Oct 1814 in Norfolk, VA. He was the son of 8. Thomas Overstreet, Jr. and 9. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner. He married 5. Elizabeth Gordon 24 Dec 1809 in Bedford Co., VA.
5. Elizabeth Gordon, born Mar 1791 in Loudoun Co., VA; died 27 Dec 1889 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 10. John Gordon and 11. Isabella Willis.

More About Jesse Overstreet:
Burial: probably Norfolk, VA
Cause of Death: Died of typhus fever while in service (probably War of 1812)
Comment: His pension files give two different dates for his death, 7 Oct 1814 and 25 Oct 1814. They indicate that he died of typhus fever while at Norfolk, VA while in service.
Military: 1814, Probably served in the War of 1812 since he died while in service.

Notes for Elizabeth Gordon:
Comments on the wife of Jesse Overstreet:

Below are remarks I made between 2001 and 2007--

A Jesse Overstreet married Polly Gordon on 24 December 1809 according to Bedford County Marriage Records. However, in the estate settlement of Jesse's father Thomas Overstreet, Jr., Jesse's widow was listed as Elizabeth. The 1880 death record of Littleberry Overstreet listed his parents as Jesse and Bettie Overstreet and that he was age 70, indicating he was probably born in 1810. This shows that more than likely Jesse Overstreet was not married more than once. Bob Tinsley concluded that Polly and Elizabeth were the same person, that her actual name may have been Mary Elizabeth Gordon, a daughter of John Gordon who was a neighbor of Thomas Overstreet, Jr. The fact that Jesse had a son named John G. Overstreet gives credence to this possibility; perhaps he was named John Gordon Overstreet after his maternal grandfather. John Gordon's wife was Izra or Isabel Willis, but there is no proof as to whether he had more than one wife or whether she was the mother of Elizabeth Overstreet.

I find it odd that Jesse Overstreet's wife's name would be listed as Polly when she was married and later as Elizabeth and/or Bettie, but Bob Tinsley was a much better genealogist than I am and felt it was plausible.

Fortunately, in 2008, Overstreet researcher Robert B. ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, WA, mailed me his latest printout on descendants of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet, which, thanks to the discoveries of two other researchers, gives documentation that Polly and Elizabeth were the same person. The information from Rick Saunders is quoted as follows:

In several different affidavits at different times, it is shown that Jesse Overstreet died in Oct. 1814 of typhus fever while in service, and that she never remarried. That would explain why no Jesse appears in any of the censuses, but it also raises several questions regarding the children assigned to him born after 1815, including Mary (born circa 1820) on her marriage bond was listed as the daughter of Jesse, deceased.

Bedford Co., VA Court Order Book 46:375, Family History Library microfilm 1,940, 764, gives that Elizabeth Overstreet died at Body Camp, Bedford County on 27 December 1889 entitled to accrued pension, and with no assets, but with the expenses of her last sickness and burial that were borne by Granville Overstreet [her son-in-law], who was to receive $17.

I just wanted to add that she was married as "Polley" and all other records I found of her were as Elizabeth. That it is the same person as that in the pension as Elizabeth she said she was married on 24 Dec. 1809 to Jesse O., and there was also a deposition from the Clerk of Court citing the marriage of "Polly" to Jesse O. on that date to the pension commission.

Further remarks by Bryan Godfrey:

After receiving the above information in 2008 to the effect that my great5-grandmother lived until 1889, I double-checked the Bedford County Death Records to see if Elizabeth's death was recorded in them. It was, and she was listed as Elizabeth Overstreet, age 98, died of old age, father John Gordon (I was hoping it would list her mother too so I could have proof Izra Willis was her mother), and consort Granville Overstreet. Consort means wife, so this must have been a misprint, as Granville was actually her daughter Mary's husband whom she lived with. However, I do not know what became of Mary after the 1880 census. It is possible, but seems far-fetched, that Mary could have died while Elizabeth was living with them and then Elizabeth married her son-in-law, Granville Overstreet. But more than likely, Elizabeth was an unfortunate victim of two errors in recording, both on her marriage record and on her death record, which has prevented her descendants in the past few generations from knowing much about her until now. It would be safe to assume her name might have been Mary Elizabeth Gordon (Polly normally being a nickname for Mary and Bettie a nickname for Elizabeth) if only there were not another Polly Gordon being listed in the records as marrying Daniel Harris, for which John Gordon, likely her father, was surety. More than likely, Elizabeth's actual maiden name was Elizabeth Gordon and she was known as Bettie, and Polly Gordon Harris was her sister for whom she named her youngest child, Mary Harris Overstreet.

It is fascinating to me that Elizabeth Gordon Overstreet, probably my last-living great-great-great-great-great-grandparent, lived so long through so many generations and had so many descendants, but I regret that her grave location is most likely lost, that there are probably no extant photographs of her, and that nothing is known of her ancestry beyond her father and maternal grandfather. She and her father-in-law, Thomas Overstreet, Jr., were both in their 98th year when they died, and she was probably the last surviving child-in-law of Thomas. She was still living when my great-grandfather, Herbert Colon Overstreet (1885-1967), was born, and he was not her first great-great-grandchild, as one of her first great-great-grandchildren appears to have been William Louis Robertson (1878-1963), whose son Louis "Rucker" Robertson (1907-1990) married Herbert's oldest daughter, Lucille Estus Overstreet (1908-1965), the two of them most likely not knowing they were fourth cousins through the Overstreet family. Whether Elizabeth AKA Bettie actually held my Great-Grandfather Herbert C. Overstreet we will never know, but more than likely she saw him, and it seems fairly certain that my Great-Uncle Ruck Robertson's father would have remembered her since he was eleven when his great-great-grandmother died. Whether Bettie saw and/or held Herbert is a question that my great-grandfather's mother, Lucy Cheek Overstreet (1861-1958), could have answered more than fifty years ago, another Overstreet matriarch in my ancestry who lived through many generations and had a prolific family of descendants. The fact that my great-grandfather lived to be a great-grandparent means that he lived through eight generations of the Overstreet family, although both of his Overstreet great-grandparents, Littleberry and Mildred Witt Overstreet, died before he was born; Elizabeth seems to have outlived some, if not all, of her children, including her son Littleberry who died in 1880. Even more interesting is the fact that two other descendants of Elizabeth's were born a few years before her death and lived into the 1970s and 1980s, into my lifetime and in the latter case after I became interested in genealogy as a teenager and knew of Elizabeth and Jesse Overstreet. The one who lived into the 1980s was a great-granddaughter, Bettie Mary Overstreet Carter (1886-1989), who was probably named for her. If only I could have met her, I may have touched hands with someone who probably touched hands with someone born in the 1700s, but perhaps some cousins of mine in her family around my age can claim that distinction! Mrs. Carter may have known where Elizabeth was buried and whether there was a photograph of her. I missed that opportunity to find out by nearly twenty years.

More About Elizabeth Gordon:
Census 1: 05 Jul 1870, Listed in the household (housekeeper) of Mary and Granville Overstreet (her daughter and son-in-law) in Liberty Township (present-day Bedford City), Bedford Co., VA.
Census 2: 21 Aug 1850, Elizabeth Overstreet listed in Southern District of Bedford Co., VA, age 50, in household of Granville Overstreet (son-in-law); unable to read or write. Birthplace listed as Virginia.
Census 3: 1880, Listed as E. Overstreet, age 85, in household of son-in-law Granville Overstreet in Liberty Magisterial District, Bedford Co., VA, The census erroneously refers to as mother of head of household when she was actually Granville's mother-in-law.
Comment 1: 1850, listed as widow of Jesse Overstreet in estate settlement of Thomas Overstreet
Comment 2: Her death record lists birthplace as Bedford, but the fact that her father was listed in her Grandfather Willis' household in Loudoun in 1791 indicates she was probably born in Loudoun Co., VA
Comment 3: It is not known why she was referred to as Polly in her marriage record. She apparently had a sister named Mary or Polly, and the record may have recorded her first name wrongly as Polly instead of Elizabeth.
Comment 4: Several affidavits at different times refer to Jesse Overstreet dying in service in 1814 of typhus and that his widow Elizabeth never remarried
Comment 5: The discovery by researcher Rick Saunders that Jesse died in 1814 opened up a mystery because it questions the paternity of his daughter Mary, born about 1820 according to census estimates. Perhaps she was born around 1815 instead.
Comment 6: There were 2 Jesse Overstreets of the same time period in Bedford. The other, son of James and Frances Eubank Overstreet, is often listed as the one who married Polly Gordon. These Overstreets lived on the north side of Bedford County and were related.
Comment 7: When she married Jesse Overstreet, her name was recorded as Polly Gordon, but all later records refer to her as Elizabeth or Bettie. Jesse's Pension File and other court documents prove she was the same person who married Jesse, as marriage date matches.
Comment 8: 27 Dec 1889, In the Bedford Co., VA Register of Deaths, p. 140, she is listed as Elizabeth Overstreet, age 98, died of old age, father listed as John Gordon, birthplace Bedford. It erroneously lists Granville Overstreet, her son-in-law, as her husband, a likely error.
Event 1: Dec 1854, Gave a deposition in court to qualify for a pension as the widow of Jesse Overstreet who died in service.
Event 2: 27 Dec 1889, According to Bedford Co., VA Court Order Book 46, p. 375, Elizabeth Overstreet died at Body Camp entitled to an accrued pension, and that her last expenses were born by Granville Overstreet (husband of her daughter Mary).
Residence: 1850, living with Mary & Granville Overstreet in Bedford Co., VA

Children of Jesse Overstreet and Elizabeth Gordon are:
2 i. Littleberry Overstreet, born Abt. 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; died Jul 1880 in Staunton River District, Bedford Co., VA; married Mildred Witt 12 Dec 1836 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. James W. Overstreet, born Abt. 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1887 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Lucinda P. Newman 30 Dec 1839 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1815 in Bedford Co., VA; died 24 Feb 1862 in Bedford Co., VA; married (2) Elizabeth Meador 11 Oct 1862 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1825; married (3) Amelia "Mildred" Updike 11 Dec 1873 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1836 in Bedford Co., VA; died 20 Jun 1886 in Bedford Co., VA; married (4) Marinda "Ann" Stinnett 11 Aug 1886; born Abt. 1851 in Bedford Co., VA; died 26 Jan 1926 in Bedford Co., VA.
iii. John G(ordon?) Overstreet, born 24 Aug 1811 in Bedford Co., VA; died 05 May 1882 in Bedford Co., VA; married Lucy S. Dowdy 10 Dec 1834 in Bedford Co., VA; born 09 Oct 1812 in Bedford Co., VA.
iv. Mary Harris Overstreet, born Bef. 1820 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bet. 1880 - 1900 in Bedford Co., VA; married Granville Overstreet 17 Feb 1845 in Bedford Co., VA; born Sep 1822 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 14 Feb 1907.

More About Granville Overstreet:
Occupation: 1860, millwright
Residence: Bedford Co., VA

6. Rowland Witt, born Abt. 1768 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1838 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 12. Lewis Witt and 13. Anna Mills. He married 7. Sarah Duvall 31 Jan 1793 in Campbell Co., VA (bond date).
7. Sarah Duvall, born Abt. 1776 in probably Prince Georges Co., MD, Henry Co., VA, or Franklin Co., VA; died 1822 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 14. Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall and 15. Elizabeth ?.

More About Sarah Duvall:
Nickname: Sally

Children of Rowland Witt and Sarah Duvall are:
i. Anne Witt, married Isaac Wright 13 Dec 1837 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. Agnes Witt
iii. Mary Witt, married James Hamilton 18 Dec 1832 in Bedford Co., VA.
iv. Keziah Witt, married Joshua West 07 Jan 1825 in Bedford Co., VA.
v. Elizabeth Witt, married John Pollard 21 Dec 1824 in Bedford Co., VA.
vi. John Witt, born Abt. 1795 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mildred Howard 21 Dec 1818 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1803 in Bedford Co., VA.
3 vii. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; died 18 Jul 1872 in Bedford Co., VA; married Littleberry Overstreet 12 Dec 1836 in Bedford Co., VA.

Generation No. 4

8. Thomas Overstreet, Jr., born 15 Oct 1744 in Orange Co., VA; died 11 Apr 1842 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 16. Thomas Overstreet and 17. Agnes Stone?. He married 9. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner Abt. 1775 in probably Bedford Co., VA.
9. Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner, born Abt. 1755 in probably Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1825 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 18. James Turner, Jr. and 19. ? Phelps?.

Notes for Thomas Overstreet, Jr.:
The following is quoted from Bob Tinsley's speech to the Overstreet Family Reunion on June 20, 1998 at the Terrace Restaurant at Bedford, Virginia:

Thomas Overstreet, Jr. was born about 1750, the son of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet. (When he prepared this speech, Mr. Tinsley was not aware of Thomas Overstreet's 1833 Revolutionary Pension request when he stated he was born October 15, 1744 in Orange County, Virginia). When he was only several years old, his parents moved to Bedford County and settled on Orrix Creek in front of Johnson Mountain. When Thomas Jr. was about thirteen, the family moved again to the northwest to a new home on Falling Creek. Here Thomas Jr. grew to adulthood. In 1773 Thomas was given a 220 acre tract by his father. This tract later taxed as 200 acres was located on the headwaters of the east fork of Difficult Creek in the area now known as Chestnut Fork. It was part of a 1230 acre tract bought by his father from Charles Irby in 1772. Here he apparently lived until about 1787 when he sold the land. During the late 1770's, Thomas apparently served in the American Revolution effort. He was listed as a veteran in his obituary in the "Lynchburg Virginian" triweekly newspaper. He also took a wife named Barsheba who was reputed to be a Native American [incorrect; she was later proven to be white and a Turner], before 1780. Here on Difficult Creek, nearby to his parents, now quite elderly, he began to raise his family. He left Difficult Creek in 1787. The land was sold in 1787 with the part north of Difficult Creek, 140 acres, going to Jehu Lewis and the southern part, 70 acres, going to William Thurman. Thomas, Jr. apparently moved to the 337 acre tract just southeast of the Irby tract. His dad, Thomas, Sr., had purchased the tract in 1786. Here Thomas would remain for the rest of his life. At the end of 1791 Thomas Sr. died. In his will, Thomas Jr. along with his brother, John, were appointed as executors. His mother was pushing 60 years of age. Thomas, Jr. had his hands full. Now the full responsibility for all his father's estate as well as caring for his own family which included a wife and at least nine children. His father's will left him another tract of land which he chose to be the 337 acre tract he was already living on. Either his mother died shortly after her husband, or she went to live with one of her children, for within a year, Thomas, Jr., acting as executor, sold the balance of the Falling Creek home tract to John Mayhew. Thomas, like his father, looked to increasing the land holdings.

In 1793, the year after his father died, Thomas found that the land tract to the east of the 240 acre grant to his father was up for grabs. Thomas, along with William Callaway, submitted a survey for the 840 acres, and in 1795 the grant was issued. However by that time, he had disposed of the 240 acre tract, selling off parcels to John Wigginton, Elijah Weeks, and Thomas' own brother, John.

By 1800 Thomas and Barsheba's children were born, all of them. There were at least fifteen children, and perhaps sixteen. At this time they ranged from adults, Mary and James, both married, to babies, the youngest, Archibald, being born in 1800. Thomas and Barsheba were about fifty years old. Life was apparently good to them since all of the children survived to adulthood and married. Thomas, I am confident, wanted to take care of his sons and daughters as they reached adulthood by seeing to it that they had land. His father for the most part had done this, but then there were only six children. Thomas Jr. had sixteen, and nowhere near the resources to do with. Thus the oldest son (?), James, married in 1799 and went to seek his fortune in Tennessee about 1810. He may have been following in the footsteps of Thomas' brother William, who migrated to Tennessee shortly after 1802. By 1822 Thomas' other brother, John, migrated west, apparently ending up in Ohio, and then to Illinois. Thomas would be the only son of Thomas Sr. who stayed in Bedford County.

Marriages of the children now started happening at a rapid pace. Elizabeth, Sarah, and John married in 1801, William and Jesse married in 1809, Jeremiah in 1810, in 1813 Stephen married, followed by Barsheba in 1815, Littleberry in 1816, Lewis in 1817 (twelve down and four to go). George and Archibald tied the knot in 1820, Thomas Jr. (III) in 1824, and finally Benoney in 1825.

In the midst of all this, Thomas maintained the home tract on Glady Branch 337 acres, and added a 70 acre tract near Dumpling Mountain just to the northeast. He sold this land to his son Lewis in 1817, the year he married. And in the same year he sold off the Island Creek grant. Thus, by the time Benoney married in 1825, he had reduced his holdings to the home tract on Glady Branch. In January, 1824, he sold Benoney 34 1/4 acres of the home tract. He sold another tract, 33 1/2, to Benoney in 1825, shortly after Benoney's marriage. Then disaster struck.

In early 1826 Thomas wife of forty-six years (?), Barsheba, died. She was about seventy years old and Thomas was a few years older than that. Other men would have adjusted to the loss, but not Thomas. After recording a prenuptial agreement, having their individual estates go to their own heirs, he married again on November 30, 1826 to Frances Roberts.

In 1831 another twenty plus acres of the home tract was sold to Benoney. The tracts adjoined each other and were the eastern end of the home tract. Benoney would live there until 1832, when he sold the tracts and moved out of the area to the Craddock Creek area near the Staunton River.

By 1842 Thomas and Frances were becoming so old and feeble that they could not manage their own affairs. Thomas was over ninety (actually ninety-seven) years of age and Fanny was in her seventies. Pleasant Preston appointed a committee to handle their affairs. On April 11, 1842, Thomas died, having lived a long and fruitful life. Oddly enough he didn't leave a will. His wife, Fanny, lived past 1850. Per the prenuptial agreement, the land went to Thomas' children, who couldn't agree on how to divide it. After a chancery suit amongst themselves, the court decreed that it would be sold. On October 28, 1843, Pleasant Preston, now acting on behalf of the court, sold it to James Burroughs. The saga of the Thomases had come to a close. As to the final resting place of these two warriors, we haven't a clue. Thomas, Jr. had probably outlived all his contemporaries. However, his death did not go unnoticed, for it was recorded in the Lynchburg newspaper. He left his estate in the form of hundreds of descendants, many of which still live within a stone's throw of the old homeplace, a fitting tribute. Hopefully this makes people out of these first two. And we can go on for days into the others, but hopefully we gain nothing more tonight; you know who your ancestors were. They were real people. They were busy people. They were prosperous people. They were survivors. Somewhere in the Overstreets there is a rabbit, because they had sixteen kids the second go-round. And I suspect he (Thomas Jr.) may have worn Barsheba out. But these are the first two of the Overstreets. Everybody in here is descended from these people. These are the people who showed up in the county the year after it was founded, and lived to see it become part of the United States, and become populated. And let's face it, there's not a person in this room that could do what these people did. Not anymore. If you have questions, I am available to you, today and tomorrow. Hopefully this has been enlightening. The maps that I handed out should have allowed you, if you wanted to watch through them to follow me across the pieces of land. Hopefully I got it all. Every time I turned up a rock there's another piece of Overstreet under there. Hopefully this will help you folks out.

This ends Mr. Tinsley's quoted information. At the time he gave this speech, he did not know about the booklet "Overstreet-Hall Family," a copy of which is in the Bedford Museum, which traces some of the descendants of Thomas Overstreet, Jr.'s brother, John Overstreet, who settled in Illinois.

The following is quoted from the booklet "Overstreet-Hall Family," a copy of which is in the Bedford Museum, which traces some of the descendants of Thomas Overstreet, Jr.'s brother, John Overstreet, who settled in Illinois, and shows Thomas, Jr.'s Revolutionary War pension application. The portion dealing with Thomas, Jr. is quoted as follows:

Thomas Overstreet 1744-1842
(From his pension application): On the 29th day of October, 1833, personally appeared in open court, before the county court, now sitting, Thomas Overstreet, as resident of Russell Parish in this county and state aforesaid, aged 89 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress, passed June 1833.
"That he entered the service of the United States, under the following named officers and served as herein stated--That in the fall, probably in September, he cannot recollect the day, 1777, he volunteered into the Service of the United States in Bedford County, Virginia, where he resided, under Capt. Samuel Campbell and Lieut. John Phelps, to march against the Indians, who were said at that time to be collected together in the western part of Virginia--His company rendezvoused at Bedford court house, and marched from thence thro Botecourt (sic-Botetourt) to a place called Benhevers Ford on Greenbrier River in Greenbrier County (now in West Virginia), a distance of about 130 miles, where they remained stationed one month--in expectation of the Indians--but not meeting with them, we were then marched to a mill in the same county, where we stationed about two months, still looking out for Indians, but they did not make their appearance. He was discharged by Capt. Campbell sometime in December 1777, but received no written discharge--There was no regular officers with the troops, nor any Continental regiments or companies with the troops during this tour--He was engaged in this tour three months--no other troops of any line along, but his company & no field officers."Again in the winter of 1777, he thinks the last of December, but he cannot recollect the day, he volunteered into the service of the United States, in Bedford county, Va., where he then lived, under Capt. William Leftwich, Lieut. John Phelps to march against the Indians, who were said to be still collected in the western counties of Virginia. His company rendezvoused at Anthony's Store in Bedford county & marched from thence thro Boutecourt to the lead mines on New River in Wythe county, Va. They were stationed at this place five weeks & were engaged in building a Fort, for the purpose of protecting the country against the Indians, but no Indians making their appearance, and the people becoming pacified, they were discharged by Capt. Leftwich, but received no written discharge. He was engaged in this tour five weeks--There were no regular officers, nor any continental regiments, or companies with the troops--no field officers--The troops consisting of his company alone--He was discharged at the expiration of his tour by Capt. Leftwich.
"In the month of October, he cannot recollect the day, 1779, he again volunteered into the service of the United States, in Bedford County, Va. under Capt. Jacob Early of the Virginia militia, for three months--His company rendezvoused at Maj. Ward's in Bedford County, Va. (now Campbell), and marched thence through Charlotte, Prince Edward, Cumberland, Powhatan & Chesterfield counties to Petersburg, where (he) joined the army commanded by Genl. Lawson. His other officers were Col. Charles Lynch, Maj. Leftwich, latter of whom is the same officer he marched under at certain lead mines. He was stationed about half mile from Petersburg during the whole time. Of the regular officers he recollects, Genl. Lawson, Baron Steuben, Col. Holcombe. He was discharged in December 1779 by Col. Lynch, but received no written discharge--He refers to the affidavit of Maj. Samuel Mitchell, who served with this tour, to prove his services.
"In the past two first tours mentioned above, there was but one company at any time in the service--He served not less than the period mentioned below, to wit:--the first tour three months--the second tour, five weeks--& the third tour, three months, for which he claims a pension--He has no documentary evidence of any of his services--He refers to the afidavits of Maj. Sam'l Mitchell & John Turner. Mr. Turner cannot recollect the time, in which, he served the two first tours--"
'In answer to interrogatories he states:
1. He was born in Orange county, Va.--he believes 15 Oct--1744
2. He never had any register of his age
3. He lived in Bedford county, Va. when he entered the service each time & has lived there ever since the revolution & now resides there
4. He entered the service each time as a volunteer.
5. & 6. he has answered to the best of his recollection, in his declaration
7. William Leftwich & Samuel Mitchell are persons to whom he is known in his present neighborhood, who can testify to his character, veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier of the Revolution.'
Record
After relinquishing his claims to any other pension or bounty, except for the present one, he then declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any other agency nor any other state, he signs his name.
William Leftwich, Samuel Mitchell, and John Turner all residents of Bedford county then gave their affidavits as to their memories of Thomas' service: these in turn witnessed by various Justices of the Peace. The court then certified the declarations.
Thomas Overstreet was allowed a pension of $22.88 per year. His allowable service was seven months and forty-five days; the pension was dated back to March, 1833. He died in April, 1842. His entire life was lived in Bedford county (correction-except for about the first ten or so years in Orange County). On November 23, 1826 he had married Fanny Roberts of his home county. She was allowed a pension on her application, dated March 11, 1854, at which time she was eighty-five years of age, and residing in Bedford county. Like many Overstreets, they were Methodists and were married by a Methodist preacher. The account of his War activities as given by Thomas Overstreet gives a good idea of the type of services rendered by the militia forces.

This ends the Hall-Overstreet Genealogy quoted information. A footnote on the bottom of page 68 states, "The names Leftwich, Mitchell, and Turner are prominent in Bedford county history. These pensions may be thought of as the old age benefits and social security of that period of time."

The following is Thomas Overstreet's obituary from the "Lynchburg, Virginia Times":

Another Revolutionary Soldier gone!
--------, at his residence in Bedford county, on the 11th inst., Mr. THOMAS OVERSTREET, supposed to be between ninety and one hundred years old. He has left a numerous train of relations to lament his death. His reasoning faculties had been declining for several years previous to his death.

More About Thomas Overstreet, Jr.:
Burial: Unknown location, probably in the Glady Branch Creek vicinity of Bedford Co., VA where his home tract was, south of Dumpling Mountain and east of Chestnut Fork
Comment: Thomas Overstreet, Jr. was the only son of his parents who remained in Bedford County. His brother William settled in Tennessee, and his brother John settled in Illinois. Most later Overstreets of Bedford descend from Thomas, Jr.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Probably Methodist
Event 1: 1826, His wife Barsheba died early in the year, and on November 30 he married Frances ("Fanny") Roberts, with whom he recorded a prenuptial agreement stipulating that their respective estates would go to their own heirs.
Event 2: 1833, Claimed he was born on Orange Co., VA when applying for a Revolutionary pension
Event 3: Abt. 1842, Pleasant Preston appointed a committee to handle the affairs of Thomas Overstreet, Jr. and his second wife Fanny, who were aging and unable to manage their own affairs.
Military: Bet. 1777 - 1779, Revolutionary War-volunteered as foot soldier-VA Militia-received pension 1833
Occupation: Farmer
Property 1: 1773, Granted a 220 acre tract by his father on the headwaters of Difficult Creek in the Chesnut Fork area of Bedford County; was later taxed as 200 acres. This was part of the old Charles Irby tract, where Thomas, Jr. lived until 1787 when he sold the tract.
Property 2: 1787, Sold his portion of the Irby tract on Difficult Creek to Jehu Lewis (140 acres north of the creek) and William Thurman (70 acres south of the creek). He then moved to his father's 337 acre tract on Glady Branch.
Property 3: Aft. 1787, Apparently for the last 55 years of his life on the 337 acre tract southeast of the Irby tract that had been purchased by his father in 1786. As executor of his father's will in 1792, Thomas, Jr. sold his father's Falling Creek home tract to John L. Mayhew
Property 4: 1793, He and William Callaway had an 840 acre tract surveyed which was east of Thomas, Sr.'s 240 acre grant. A grant was issued to Thomas, Jr. in 1795, by which time he had disposed of the 240 acre tract by selling parcels to his brother John and two others.
Property 5: Bef. 1817, While continuing to live on his Glady Branch home tract, he bought a 70 acre tract to the northeast near Dumpling Mountain, which he sold to his son Lewis upon Lewis' marriage in 1817.
Property 6: 1817, Sold off the Island Creek grant; began reducing his holdings as he was aging.
Property 7: Bef. 1825, Sold his son Benoney (possibly his youngest child) about 67 acres of his Glady Branch tract; sold more than 20 additional acres to Benoney in 1831, which Benoney sold the next year, moving to Craddock Creek area near the Staunton River.
Property 8: 1850, His 15 heirs received $65.70 each-Bedford Order Book 30, pp. 460-63. Upon its discovery by Bob Tinsley about 1993, this document proved extremely valuable because it listed Thomas' 15 heirs; he had no will or other record of his 15 children.
Residence 1: Bef. 1755, Was born in Orange Co., VA, but his parents were living in Bedford Co., VA by 1755 on Orrix Creek in front of Johnson Mountain.
Residence 2: Abt. 1757, His parents moved from the Orrix Creek farm northwest to a farm on Falling Creek, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 3: Abt. 1773, Lived in his early adult years on the Irby tract on Difficult Creek, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 4: Bet. 1787 - 1842, Probably lived on his 337 acre tract on Glady Branch for the last 55 years of his life.
Will: In spite of living to the age of 97 years and having at least 15 children, Thomas Overstreet, Jr. died without a will. His children disagreed on how to divide his property, so a chancery suit decreed it be sold. Pleasant Preston sold it to James Burroughs

More About Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner:
Burial: Unknown location, probably in the Glady Branch vicinity of Bedford Co., VA
Comment 1: The order of births of their 15 children are unknown-listed arbitrarily
Comment 2: Until her maiden name of Turner was determined in 2002, it was believed by some descendants that she was American Indian or part-Indian. The latter may still be true, as her mother's identity has not been determined with certainty (a Phelps or a Wimmer?)
Residence: Bedford Co., VA

Children of Thomas Overstreet and Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner are:
i. James Overstreet, born 15 Jun 1776 in Bedford Co., VA; died 14 Aug 1845 in Maury Co., TN; married Ruth Hurt 13 Sep 1799 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1776 in Bedford Co., VA; died 11 Dec 1867 in Maury Co., TN.

Notes for James Overstreet:
James was the only child of Thomas and Barsheba who is known to have left Bedford County. Most of his descendants are scattered in Tennessee, Missouri, and Oklahoma. One of the notable great-grandsons of James and Ruth Hurt Overstreet was Thomas George Overstreet (1849-1934), who married a Choctaw Indian woman, which enabled him to receive a land grant of over 3000 acres in present-day Oklahoma (then Indian Territory). Thomas George was a son of Clayton and Margaret Cutberth Overstreet, grandson of Thomas and Sally Scott Overstreet, and great-grandson of James and Ruth. He established a large homestead near Sallisaw, Oklahoma with a magnificent house built in 1895, known as the Overstreet-Kerr Farm. For the past few years several Overstreet reunions have been held at this mansion.

I am indebted to James and Ruth Hurt Overstreet's great-great-grandson, Jefferson "Lee" Overstreet (1920-2002) and his wife, Willard Keeling Overstreet (1921-2012), of Texarkana, Arkansas, for their mutual interest in Overstreet family history. They were most gracious in entertaining me and furnishing me with additional Overstreet information when I visited them in the summer of 1997 while I was living temporarily in Austin, Texas. They made several trips to his ancestral home in Bedford County, Virginia to research the Overstreet family and help host Overstreet family reunions, and also helped host reunions at the Overstreet-Kerr Farm at Sallisaw, Oklahoma, the home of his grandfather's first cousin. Several of Mr. J. Lee Overstreet's family married Choctaw Indian women with the ulterior motive of receiving large land grants in Oklahoma. His paternal grandmother was a Choctaw whose family had walked the infamous Trail of Tears from Tennessee to Oklahoma. James was the only child of Thomas and Barsheba who is known to have left Bedford County. Most of his descendants are scattered in Tennessee, Missouri, and Oklahoma. One of the notable great-grandsons of James and Ruth Hurt Overstreet was Thomas George Overstreet (1849-1934), who married a Choctaw Indian woman, which enabled him to receive a land grant of over 3000 acres in present-day Oklahoma (then Indian Territory). Thomas George was a son of Clayton and Margaret Cutberth Overstreet, grandson of Thomas and Sally Scott Overstreet, and great-grandson of James and Ruth. He established a large homestead near Sallisaw, Oklahoma with a magnificent house built in 1895, known as the Overstreet-Kerr Farm. For the past few years several Overstreet reunions have been held at this mansion.

More About James Overstreet:
Burial: Hunter-Kittrell Cemetery, Maury Co TN
Census: 1820
Comment: James Overstreet and his wife Ruth Hurt were second cousins through the Turner family. Her grandparents were Moses Hurt and Ruth Turner.

More About Ruth Hurt:
Burial: Hunter-Kittrell Cemetery, Maury Co., TN
Census: 1850

ii. Thomas Overstreet III, born Abt. 1778 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Creasy 10 Nov 1795 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1774 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Thomas Overstreet III:
"There was one correction I could make based on hearing Bob Tinsley's speech last year at the Bedford Museum. We had been listing Thomas C. Overstreet, who was married three times, as a son of Thomas and Barsheba, but it seems more likely that he was a grandson instead. Mr. Tinsley never could account for the Thomas Overstreet who married Mary Creasey in 1793, but in his last speech he said he must have been the son of Thomas and Barsheba and the father of the Thomas C. Overstreet who married (1) Elizabeth Dickerson; (2) Mary Creasey, and (3) Margaret Taylor. He said the middle initial was probably C for Creasey, the maternal grandfather being Thomas Creasey." per Bryan Godfrey email Dec'01, rbo.

Comment by Bryan Godfrey in 2008: This seems confusing, but it seems most likely that Thomas Overstreet, III's wife was Mary Creasy, and his son Thomas C. Overstreet's second wife was also a Mary Creasy/Creasey.

More About Thomas Overstreet III:
Comment 1: His estimated birthdate seems to match the Thos. Overstreet Sen. who d Apr 1858 of ulcers, age 80, in the poor house, information furnished by H. Beard, Overseer of the poor, according to Bedford Death Records.
Comment 2: There was also a Thos. Overstreet who died 3 Apr 1859 in the Poor House of a sore leg, information also furnished by James H. Beard.

iii. Mary Overstreet, born Abt. 1779 in Bedford Co., VA; died Dec 1850; married (1) Rev. Elijah Hurt 20 Dec 1797 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA?; married (2) Pleasant White 18 Jan 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA.

More About Rev. Elijah Hurt:
Date born 2: Abt. 1772

iv. John Overstreet, born Abt. 1780 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bef. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA; married Peggy Cannady 19 Aug 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1778.
v. William Overstreet, born Abt. 1780 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1859; married Nancy Ann Weeks 01 Nov 1809 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1780.
vi. Sarah Overstreet, born Abt. 1782 in Bedford Co., VA; married John Taylor 19 Mar 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1776.
vii. Elizabeth Overstreet, born Abt. 1784 in Bedford Co., VA; died Dec 1850; married John Richeson (Richardson) 23 Feb 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1780.
viii. Jeremiah Overstreet, born Abt. 1788 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bef. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA; married Lucinda White 25 Oct 1810 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1794 in Pittsylvania Co., VA?; died 18 Jul 1859 in Bedford Co., VA.
4 ix. Jesse Overstreet, born Bef. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died Oct 1814 in Norfolk, VA; married Elizabeth Gordon 24 Dec 1809 in Bedford Co., VA.
x. Littleberry Overstreet, born Abt. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died 24 Oct 1847 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Ann Higgins 01 Nov 1816 in Bedford Co., VA; died 03 Jul 1848 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Littleberry Overstreet:
The following is quoted from Gerald Preas, Overstreet descendant, in regard to Ben T. Overstreet:

In the past we have thought that the illusive father could have been George Dickerson Overstreet. By looking at this Death Cert I have concluded his parents to be Littleberry and Mary Overstreet. The book "Overstreets from Virginia" by Bob Overstreet, Pg. 4 has a Littleberry son of Thomas Jr. born before 1800. His wife, Mary born 1790. Ben T was born 1824 so dates are correct. His son is one on death certificate says Berry and Mary parents. If my name was Littleberry I would go by Berry too. gerald
###
Littleberry/Littlebury Overstreet
Berry Overstreet was my 4th grandfather
Following information was taken from War of 1812 Bounty Land record Group 15, National Archives Wash D.C.
Died 1Oct, 24-1847, Bedford County Va
Married Mary Higgins 11-1-1816
Mary Higgins Overstreet died July 3, 1848
A Guardian of Martha Ann Overstreet, minor, Charles A or H (script too fancy for me to read) brings to court a document requesting land. This was October 15, 1855, saying Martha Ann Overstreet is 18 years and six month old. Littleberry was a Private serving under 7th (Saunders') Virginia Melita, honorable Discharged at Norfolk Va.,1st day of March 1814.
At the time of the Act of September 1850, the following were minors Samuel ?, Mary J? and said Martha Ann Overstreet.
Only comments was Additional Evidence requested
==========
Children of Littleberry Mary Higgins Overstreet
Benjamin T born about 1821 LVA Death Cert lists Berry and Mary as parents Died Dec 11.1893
Ben married Martha Ann Turner 15 Dec 1845

Martha Ann 1 Feb 1837
Samuel unk
Mary J unk
===========
Possible children
Charles
Alexander
Per email to Overstreet Rootsweb 21 Jan 2005, from GERALD PREAS , rbo.
###
Littleberry Overstreet and Mary Higgins of Bedford County Va had these known children.
Source Record Group Records of the Veteran Adm. War of 1812, Littleberry Overstreet, Capt Pleasant Coggins, Co 7, Va Inf. (Saunder's Inf) Nation Archives Wash. D C
At time of the Act Sept 1850 there were three minor children to wit: Samuel (P, H, K or something else as fancy script), Mary J, Martha Ann. Charles ( H or A fancy script) was guardian. Benjamin Thomas the other son was not mentioned, however, on his death cert. is listed Berry and Mary as parents.
Death date of Littleberry Oct 24, 1847 Bedford County Va. Mary Higgins Overstreet died Bedford Va., July 3, 1848. Bible record that Martha Ann Overstreet, born, Feb 1, 1837. Gerald Preas, email 3/9 '08.

More About Littleberry Overstreet:
Comment: It was previously believed that he was the only child of the 15 known children of Thomas and Barsheba Overstreet who did not have children. Evidence has since been located that he had at least 4 children, Benjamin T., Samuel, Mary J., and Martha Ann.
Military: 1812, War of 1812--Private in the 7th Regiment of Virginia Militia. War of 1812 records of the Veterans Administration indicate three minor children, Samuel, Mary J., and Martha Ann, at the time of an 1850 act specifying pensions; Charles Overstreet guardian.
Nickname: Berry

More About Mary Ann Higgins:
Nickname: Polly

xi. Stephen Overstreet, born Abt. 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; married Eunice Crouch 06 Mar 1813 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1795 in Bedford Co., VA; died 20 Aug 1879 in Central District, Bedford Co., VA.

More About Eunice Crouch:
Comment: In Bedford Death Records, a Unie Overstreet is listed as dying 20 Aug 1879 in the poor house of old age, age 85; information furnished by R.M. Beard, Friend--this is probably this Eunice Crouch Overstreet.

xii. Lewis Burwell Overstreet, born Abt. 1792 in Bedford Co., VA; died 1863 in Floyd Co., VA; married Mary Ann Davis 04 Sep 1817 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1802; died Bef. 1850.

More About Lewis Burwell Overstreet:
Military: War of 1812
Residence 1: 1840, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 2: 1850, Fayette Co., VA (now in WV)
Residence 3: 1860, Floyd Co., VA

xiii. Barsheba Overstreet, born Abt. 1794 in Bedford Co., VA; died 29 Jun 1858 in Bedford Co., VA; married John Thomas Crouch 06 Mar 1815 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1792; died 17 Jan 1876 in Bedford Co., VA.

More About John Thomas Crouch:
Military: War of 1812

xiv. Benjamin Oney (Benoni) Overstreet, born 25 Apr 1796 in Bedford Co., VA; died 17 Oct 1884 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Anne Preston 28 Feb 1825 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1808 in Bedford Co., VA; died 05 Jul 1885 in Bedford Co., VA.

Notes for Benjamin Oney (Benoni) Overstreet:
The following is quoted from the database of Benoni's great-great-grandson, Robert Bruce ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, Washington:

I have noted on some mailing lists mention of the given name of Benoni. This is an unusual name, and some people think that it is an Italian family name and the child is named after his or her mother's family and then indicate that they have been unable to find a family with that surname.
Actually Benoni is a Biblical name that means "son of my sorrow." It was the original name given to the younger son of the patriarch Jacob. Rachel, his mother, in her dying agony named the child Benoni. (Genesis 35:18).
This name was often given in American Colonial times to a child whose mother died in childbirth or whose father died before the child was born. In fact, this is an important clue. When one sees the name Benoni, look to see what sad event might have caused the child to be given that name. It might have been the death of a grandparent, a parent or a sibling. By Carl Hommel

***************************************************************************

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~overstrt/Land/vapitt.html

Purchases:
1824 - Deed book 18, page 256 - purchased 34+ acres from Thomas Overstreet &ux

1825 - Deed book 19, page 305 - purchased 33 1/2 acres on waters of Gladys Br

1831 - Deed book 22, page 342 - purchased 20A 2R 17P on which Thomas Overstreet resides

The first two purchases were in the name of Benoney Overstreet and the third one in the name of Benjamin Oney Overstreet.

More About Benjamin Oney (Benoni) Overstreet:
Burial: present-day Dixie Acres subdivision of Bedford Co., VA, near Smith Mountain Lake
Residence: Aft. 1832, Settled in the present-day area of Dixie Acres and Smith Mountain Lake in Bedford Co., VA. Part of his property was inundated when the lake was created in the 1950s and 1960s, but not his home and cemetery.

xv. Archibald Overstreet, born Abt. 1800 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA; married Mary Crouch 18 Dec 1820 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1802 in Bedford Co., VA; died Bef. 1850 in Bedford Co., VA.

10. John Gordon, born Abt. 1770; died Aft. 1849 in Bedford Co., VA?. He married 11. Isabella Willis in Loudoun Co., VA?.
11. Isabella Willis, born Abt. 1775 in Loudoun Co., VA; died Aft. 1849 in Bedford Co., VA?. She was the daughter of 22. George Willis and 23. ? Lucas?.

Notes for John Gordon:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/gordon/messages/7341.html

From the Loudoun Co Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1800:

1789C Second Battalion Gorden, John residing with Mayhugh, John and Lynes, Pearson and Carrell, Wm.
1790A [Second Battalion] Gordon, James and Gordon, Jno.
1791A Second Battalion Gorden, Jno. residing with Willis, George
1793B Second Battalion Gordin, James and Gordin, Jno.
1794B Second Battalion Gordin, James and Gordin, John
1795B Second Battalion Gorden, John
1796B Cameron Parish (2nd Battalion) Gorden, John

Order Book M, 14 April 1790
[p. 41] Samuel EDWARDS ass'ee of John WILLIS against John GORDON – upon a petition – Defendant failed to appear; judgment granted Plaintiff against Defendant for 50 Shillings with 5% interest from 25 December 1788 and costs.

Pat Duncan
[emailprotected]

Children of John Gordon and Isabella Willis are:
i. Mary (Polly) Gordon, married Daniel Harris 23 Dec 1812 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1790.

More About Mary (Polly) Gordon:
Comment: Need to prove she is a daughter of John and Izra Gordon. John Gordon was surety for her marriage. Mary Harris Overstreet, daughter of Elizabeth Gordon, was probably named for her and she was probably Mary's aunt.

5 ii. Elizabeth Gordon, born Mar 1791 in Loudoun Co., VA; died 27 Dec 1889 in Body Camp, Bedford Co., VA; married Jesse Overstreet 24 Dec 1809 in Bedford Co., VA.
iii. Sarah Gordon?, born Abt. 1798.
iv. Nancy Gordon, born Abt. 1800; died Aft. 1859 in Knox Co., TN?; married Braxton Bailey 28 Jul 1817 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1797; died Bet. 1855 - 1860 in Montgomery Co., VA.

More About Nancy Gordon:
Census: 1860, Listed in 12th District of Knox Co., TN with daughter Elizabeth, son-in-law Wade McDaniel, their children, and daughter Isabella.
Comment: Need to prove she is a daughter of John and Izra Gordon. John Gordon was surety for her marriage.

v. Martha Gordon?, born Abt. 1810.

12. Lewis Witt, born Bef. 1735 in present-day Powhatan Co., VA?; died Bef. 28 Feb 1774 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 24. Benjamin Witt and 25. Marianne Chastain. He married 13. Anna Mills Aft. 1755 in Amherst Co., VA?.
13. Anna Mills, born in Goochland Co., VA?; died Abt. 1816 in Bedford Co., VA. She was the daughter of 26. William Mills and 27. Mary Walton?.

Notes for Lewis Witt:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Witt-773

Biography
Lewis Witt was born to Benjamin Witt and Marianne Chastain about 1730, likely in Goochland County, Virginia Colony (Albemarle Co. was formed from Goochland Co. in 1744.)[1]. Alternatively, Lewis' birth is listed as about 1740 in Virginia in the DAR database[2]. This birth would make him very young (~15) if he married after 1755 (see below).

Lewis married Anne Mills (possibly daughter of William and Mary Mills)[1] sometime after September 1755, when Anne was shown as unmarried in her father's will.

From the WikiTree profile of his father Benjamin Witt Sr.:

By June 1755 Benjamin and his family are living in Prince Edward County. The list of tithables between Bush and Buffalo Rivers, Prince Edward County, taken by Thomas Scott lists Benjamin Witt & his sons Charles Witt & Lewis Witt -- 3 thithables.[3] In 1756 Benjamin purchased land in Prince Edward County with his children Lewis and Charles as witnesses.[4]
Lewis is described in the research by Robert Baird on his father, Benjamin Witt, Sr., as follows[5]:

In 1756, as a resident of Buckingham County, he [Benjamin Witt, Sr.] purchased land in Prince Edward County with his children Lewis and Charles as witnesses [32[6]]. He and his sons Lewis and Charles were all on the 1755 tithables list of Prince Edward, though Charles appealed the tax (probably because he was still a resident of Buckingham). His sons Lewis and Charles both appeared as witness to deeds in the next few years, but Benjamin himself seems to have gone back to Buckingham County where he appears in its records.
Children
The will of Anne (as widow of Lewis Witt) named the following eight children (one deceased and seven living) for Anne and Lewis Witt. Anne's will was probated in 1816[7].

Mills (eldest)
Jesse
John Witt
Rowland Witt
Robert
Agnes Witt (as Agatha Lavender)
Milly (as Milly Whitton)
Elizabeth (as Betsy Calvert, deceased with 5 children)
Land
9 February 1773: Lewis purchased from John Cooper land on Island Creek on Otter River in Bedford County, Virginia Colony. In 1785, following the death of Lewis, this land was the subject of a Chancery Case in Bedford County. See the full transcription in the Images tab[8]. Lewis and Anne's land has been mapped by Elizabeth Shown Mills and is available on her website[9]

Death
Lewis passed away about 1774 in Bedford County, Virginia Colony[10]. He died sometime between February 1773 and March 1774 based on Chancery Case #1785-011 (transcription attached[11]).

*****************************************************************

Bedford County Court, 28 Feb 1774, recorded in book 5A, page 261, A Deed, Oglesby to Richard Oglesby Proved by L. Witt; page 263, SL #30579 28 Feb 1774 "On the motion of Ann Witt letters of Admin is Granted her on the Estate of Lewis Witt Dec'd who make Oath & gave Bond w'th Sec'y ac'g to Law. William Adams, John Adams, Thomas Robinson & Robert Mitchell are ap'd to appraise the sd Decedents Estate. Book 5B, page 291, May 1774, An Inventory and Appraisment of the Estate of Lewis Witt Deceased was Exhibited in Court and Ordered to be Recorded.

Bedford County, Virginia, Will Book 1, page 211, SL#30538
Witts List of the Estate of Lewis Witt Dec'd Appraised by Robert\
Appraisment Mitchell, Thomas Robinson & William Adams 21st May 1774 Being first sworn upon\
the Evangelist\
1 Mare L6-19-0 1 ditto L6 L12 - 10 - 0
1 Spinning Wheel 10/ A drawing knife & hd saw 7/6 0 - 17 - 6
1 Cotton Wheel 8/ 1 Rasor and Case 1/ 0 - 9 - 0
Sundry Books 5/6 1 Pocket Book 1/ 0 - 6 - 6
Sundry Shoe tools 3/6 1 froe 2/6 0 - 6 - 0
3 Cows and Calfs L8-0-0 4 Heifers L 4-0-0 12 - 0 - 0
17 Head of Hogs 66/ 2 Axes 10/ 1 Howell? 1/6 3 - 17 - 6
1 Hatchet and 1 Round Shear 0 - 3 - 0
3 Hoes and Mattock 8/ 2 pieces Leather 2/6 0 - 10 - 6
1 Gun 15/ 1 Plain wt Stock and a Chizal 3/9 0 - 18 - 9
1 Read 4/6 3 Pr Cards 6/3 1 Sifter 6d 0 - 11 - 3
1 Sadle and Bridle 15/ 1 Hatchel 5/ 1 - 0 - 0
a parcel of pewter 20/ a parcel of Delphs 6/ 1 - 6 - 0
1 Copper Coffee Pott 9/ 15 Spoons and 1 Kettle 5/6 0 - 14 - 6
a parcel of stone ware and a Candle Stick 0 - 2 - 6
A Table & Chest wt 2 Chairs 0 - 10 - 0
2 Potts 1 Skillet & 1 Frying Pan 0 - 11 - 0
2 pails 4/6 6w Cotton 9/ 2w Wool 3/ 0 - 16 - 6
a Parcel of Flax 2/6 Cotton Yarn & Thread Do Value 33/ 1 - 15 - 6
a plough wt hoe (?) 0 - 3 - 0
2 Beds wt Bedsteds and furniture 5 - 15 - 0
2 Sad Irons 4/ 1 Cow hyde 6/ 0 - 10 - 0
------------------------------------------------------------
Witness our hands date as above 45 - 14 - 0
Robert Mitchell, Thomas Robinson, Wm X Adams. Test...R. Cowan

*******************************************************
-----Original Message-----
From: [emailprotected]
To: [emailprotected]
Sent: Sun, Jun 28, 2009 2:54 pm
Subject: Lewis Witt parentage problem

Mr. Bates,

I spoke with you back in 1997 when I first learned that most now claim my ancestor Lewis Witt was a son of Benjamin Witt and Marianne Chastain. I understand the main claim is based on Lewis appearing on a deed for land purchased by Benjamin Witt in 1756, and on process of elimination because of the fact that William Witt's son John did not mention a son Lewis in his will in 1782. However, I've never felt overly comfortable claiming descent from the Chastain family because Benjamin did not leave a will which may have mentioned Lewis as a son and because Lewis named a son John but did not name any children Benjamin or Marianne.

One item which makes me consider the possibility he was a son of John Witt of Amherst is the fact that Lewis was already deceased when John wrote his will. That could explain why Lewis was not mentioned as a son. Had the will been written prior to Lewis' death in 1774, I would feel more comfortable ruling out Lewis being a son of John and Lucy Littleberry Witt, but the fact that the will was written after his death makes me consider the possibility he was John's son rather than Benjamin's. Secondly, I cannot prove that Lewis Witt married Anne Mills, daughter of William Mills of Amherst, but the fact that the Millses were in Amherst makes me wonder whether Lewis was a son of John and grew up in Amherst rather than in Buckingham or Prince Edward which would be the case if he were Benjamin's son. Even if Anne were a Mills, she may not be identical with William Mills of Amherst's daughter Anna or a sister of the Tory Col. Ambrose Mills; she could have been the daughter of a Mills in Goochland who lived adjacent to a Witt there.

But if Lewis were John's son rather than Benjamin's, I agree it seems unlikely he would have witnessed a deed where his uncle lived when he would have probably lived in Amherst, and that the fact that he witnessed the deed is good circ*mstantial evidence that he was Benjamin and Marianne's son. Also, Lewis settled in Bedford as did his probable brother Benjamin Witt, Jr., and Marianne had a nephew named Lewis Chastain who was probably named for his likely first cousin Lewis Witt.

I'm just looking for any circ*mstantial evidence to make me feel comfortable claiming descent from the Chastain family.

Thanks,

Bryan

Mr. Bates' reply:

Lewis Witt of Amherst Co., was son of Abner Witt b ca 1738. It is telling that Lewis Witt witnessed many deeds for Abner Witt, but not for any other Witt.

This Lewis Witt left an orphan named Jane Lewis Witt, who married her guardian (whose name don't come to mind at the moment).

Lewis Witt of Amherst Co., VA should not be confused with Lewis Witt d1774, who had record in Buckingham and Bedford Co., Va.

All of the children of Benjamin Witt & wife Marianne Chastain ended up in Bedford Co., except Charles Witt, who stayed in Buckingham Co.

Bedford Co. Records
1. Lewis Witt
2. John Witt d after 1821
3. Benjamin Witt d before 1789
4. Marianne Witt Franklin

John Chastain, brother of Marianne Chastain Witt lived in Bedford Co., VA.

Wayne Witt Bates
http://www.witts-end.org

More About Lewis Witt:
Comment 1: The fact that Lewis Witt and Benjamin Witt witnessed Benjamin Witt, Sr.'s purchase of 204 acres in Prince Edward Co., VA in 1756 is the best circ*mstantial evidence that Benjamin was their father.
Comment 2: Earlier genealogies of the Witt family listed Lewis as a son of William Witt, but he was not listed in William's will so later researchers stated he must have been a grandson and narrowed the possibilities down to Benjamin (son of William) as his father.
Comment 3: The fact that Lewis Witt witnessed his father's 1756 purchase indicates he must have been born before 1738, since he had to be over 18 years of age to be a witness to a legal document.
Event: 28 Feb 1774, His wife Anne Witt was granted administration of his estate in Bedford Co., VA.
Residence 1: Abt. 1756, Prince Edward Co., VA
Residence 2: Bef. 1765, Settled in Bedford Co., VA

Notes for Anna Mills:
SL#30579, Bedford County Court Record Book 6, November Court 1774, Guy Smith, Robert Cowan & Robert Alexander appointed to lay off & allot to Ann Witt Widow of Lewis Witt her One third part of the Dec'd Estate. July 28, 1777 (same film etc) Isham Talbot Gent. appointed to Lay off and allot to Ann Witt Widow of Lewis Witt Dec'd her part of the said Decedants Estate in the Room of Robert Cowan who is removed out of this Country.
page 165 to Ann Witt al'd L15 for the support of her and her Family 1 Year in the absence of her Son a Soldier in the Service of the United States wch is orderd to be Cert.
page 200, 24 July 1780, on the mo of Ann Witt her Negroe fellow London is set Levy free.

Bedford County Will Book 4, pages 276-7, SL#30539
In the name of God amen, I Ann Witt of Bedford County State of Virginia being through the attendant surety & goodness of God being of sound state of mind & disposing memory & calling to mind the uncertainty of human life & being desirous to dispose of such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with I give and bequeath the same in manner and form following - Having already given unto my son Mills Witt part of my tract of land (lying in the said county) I give the balance of said tract of land with all the estate I may be possessed of at my decease to be divided amongst my children and grand children in the manner hereafter mentioned & if the said tract of Land cannot be divided to any advantage amongst my children hereafter named it is my desire that my executors hereafter named shall dispose of the same in a manner they shall think most profitable, that is to say they may sell the Said land for cash or on account as they may think best and the money arising from such sale together with such other estate I may be possessed of at my decease to be divided share & share alike as followeth to my sons Jesse John Rowland & Robert each a share, to my daughters Agness & Milly each a share & to my Daughter Betsy Calverts five children to be equally divided amongst them a share equal to that of one of my sons or daughters aforesaid. And lastly I herby constitute & appoint my son Jesse Witt & my friend Henry Adams Executors of this my last will & testament hereby revoking all others wills or testaments by me heretofore made - In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal this 9th day of December in the year 1811.
Signed sealed published & Declared her
as & for the last Will & Testament Anne X Witt (seal)
of the above named Anne Witt mark
in presence of us
Henry Brown, Joel Crumpacker, George White
Whereas I some time past lent my son Jesse Twenty five dollars & my son in Law william Whitton Twelve Dollars my will is that after my decease the sum of twenty five dollars shall be reducted from my son Jesses part of my estate and that the sum of Twelve dollars shall be reducted from my daughter Milly Whittons part of my estate. her
18 Oct 1813 Anne X Witt
Henry Brown mark
Joel Crumpacker, George White
At a court held for Bedford County at the Courthouse the 25th day of October in the year 1816 This last Will & Testament of Anne Witt Dec. was exhibited in court & proven by the oath of Henry Brown, Joel Crumpacker & George White the subscribing witnesses and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Jesse Witt one of the Executors therein named who made oath & gave bond & security according to law - certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due form. Liberty being reserved the other executor to join in the probate when he shall think fit.

Teste, J. Steptoe, C. B. C.

A lengthy and detailed accounting is found in Will Book 5, pages 196-7, on SL#30539, copy in files.

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http://www.genforum.familytreemaker.com/witt/messages/2079.html

Proof that Lewis Witt m Anne Mills of Amherst, VA?
Posted by: Bryan Godfrey Date: February 17, 2002 at 07:00:01
of 2889

My hope is to be able to prove that the William Mills who died about 1767 in Amherst County is the father of Anne Mills who married Lewis Witt. So far the only circ*mstantial evidence I have found for her being a Mills is that she named a son Mills Witt, and the only circ*mstantial evidence of a connection with the William/Ambrose Mills family is the Witt family's residence in Amherst, the fact that William Lavender, who married Lewis' daughter Agatha Witt, was a witness to William Mills' will, and that the Key family of Amherst was associated with both the Witts and Millses. Also, there was a 1757 land record referring to John Witt's land in Goochland which bordered the property of a William Mills, but this bothers me because the William Mills, father of Ambrose, should have been living in Amherst by then. William Mills of Amherst refers to a daughter Anna Mills, whereas Lewis Witt's wife called herself Anne Witt in her 1811 Bedford County will. I ordered a book last year on the descendants of Ambrose Mills, written by Marshall Styles who coincidentally wrote a book on a North Carolina Quaker family, the Lambs, that he and I also descend from. However, I would enjoy his Mills book more if I were more convinced Lewis Witt's wife were of that same family. Every Witt genealogy I have read says Lewis Witt married Anne Mills, and later ones have listed her parents as William and Mary Mills, whose son Ambrose was the noted Tory who was hung at King's Mountain, NC in 1781.

Posted by: Connie Moretti (ID *****6043) Date: February 24, 2003 at 17:46:59
In Reply to: Proof that Lewis Witt m Anne Mills of Amherst, VA? by Bryan Godfrey of 2889

It's been over a year since you posted your query, but I felt compelled to reply since Lewis and Anne are my direct ancestors. There will probably never be a single document that proves the connection, but there is certainly an accumulation of evidence pointing that way. For one, William Mills lived within a short distance of the Witt family on Pedlar Creek on the Amherst/Bedford line. Anne was one of the younger children, not yet married at the time the 1755 will was written. In addition to naming her first son Mills, her next two children, Milly and Jesse, were apparently named for the siblings closest in age to her. Like Mills, both are somewhat unusual names. At the time of her will and death Anne had been the widow Witt for forty years and it would be natural for her to use her married name.

Connie Moretti

More About Anna Mills:
Probate: 28 Oct 1816, Bedford Co., VA
Property 1: 1778, Purchased 15 acres from James Chastain
Property 2: According to a map in "Finding the Father of Henry Pratt of Southeastern Kentucky," National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume 100 Number 2, Anne Witt owned 2 tracts at confluence of Island Creek and Big Otter River, Bedford Co., VA.
Property 3: 1811, Sold 70 acres to John Wood

Children of Lewis Witt and Anna Mills are:
i. Agnes Witt, married Claiborne Dowdy 22 Aug 1795 in Bedford Co., VA.
ii. Mildred Witt, born Abt. 1758 in Bedford Co., VA; married William Whitten.
iii. Agatha Witt, born Abt. 1760 in Bedford Co., VA; married William Lavender.

Notes for Agatha Witt:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/witt/messages/3197.html

"Jesse (Witt) was the Executor of his mother's (Ann) will. In his settlement of the account on 6/25/1820 he lists Agnes Lavendar, Milly Whitton, Jesse Witt, John Witt, Elizabeth Calvert, Five Children, and Rowland Witt are named to receive one-seventh share. Robert Witt, William Lavinder, Polly Calvert, John W. Lavinder, Nancy Lavinder, Charles Lavinder, Clif Lavinder, Bird Lavinder, and Dosha Lavinder, are all children of Agatha (Witt) Lavinder"

I have found a formal record of an Agnes Witt marrying a Clairbourne Dowdy, but not a William Lavender.

iv. Jesse Witt, born 11 May 1762 in Bedford Co., VA; died 03 Feb 1842 in Sandy River area of Prince Edward Co., VA?; married Alice (Alcy) Brown 06 May 1786 in Bedford Co., VA; died 09 Jul 1844.

Notes for Jesse Witt:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vafrankl/jesseandalicebrownwittw6524.htm

Pension Application of Jesse and Alice Brown Witt: W6524

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

State of Virginia}

County of Bedford Sct}

On this 30th day of August in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared before the County Court of the said County of Bedford in the state aforesaid, Jesse Witt a resident of the County and state aforesaid, aged according to his belief seventy years on the 11th day of May last past, who being first duly affirmed according to law, doth on his affirmation, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress, passed June 7th 1832, that he enlisted in the army of the United States on the first day of March 1777 with Capt. George Lambert and served in the 14th Regiment of the Virginia line under the following named officers towit Colo [Charles] Lewis who commanded the Regiment in the first instance and Abraham Buford who was the Major of the same, George Lambert the Captain [last name illegible] the 1st Lieutenant, Rogers the 2nd Lieutenant and Ward[?] the Ensign of the Company in which the applicant enlisted he resided in the said County of Bedford in the aforesaid state at the time of his enlistment and marched from the said County on the 25th of March 1777 with his company which was joined by other companies at Fredericksburg, the route was subsequently through Alexandria Georgetown and Baltimore to the main Army under General Washington then lying at Middlebrook in New Jersey. Upon joining the army the 14th Regiment was a part of the brigade under General Weeden [sic: George Weedon] in the first instance. he continued in the service under the immediate command of General Washington during the whole subsequent period of his service and was in the battles of Brandywine [11 Sep 1777] & Germantown [4 Oct 1777] in the course of the last mentioned year – after the battle of Germantown (but at what particular period or in what order he cannot remember) Col Davis & Col Parker [see note below] commanded the Regiment and Gen'l. Muhlenburg [sic: Peter Muhlenberg] the Brigade to which he belonged. The army to which he was attached went into Winter quarters at Valley forge and in the spring of 1778 crossed the delaware river and pursued the British army through New Jersey to Monmouth and thence they marched to White Plains in New York and afterwards to West Point. at the latter place he was compelled by sickness to quit the field & was sent to a hospital – his company quartered that winter as he understood at Middlebrook in New Jersey, at which place he joined it in the month of May 1779 but his infirmities and & inability were such that he was shortly afterwards sent back to the Hospital and did not join his company again til shortly before his discharge, on the 10th of September in the year 1779 in the high lands of New York. he received his discharge which was signed by Colo. Parker & Gen'l Muhlenburg. He enlisted for the term of three years and after serving [two or three words illegible] from the foregoing dates more than two years, was discharged in consequence of disability incured in the performance of his duty. The discharge given him by Colo Parker & Gen'l. Muhlenburg bears testimony to the fidelity with which he has served his Country, and recommended him to the legislature of Virginia as deserving the attention and assistance of the Government. This discharge he shortly afterwards placed in the hands of the delegates representing his county in the General assembly and was in consequence thereof placed in the invalid pension list and drew for many years half pay or forty dollars per year. The discharge above mentioned he has never seen since he sent it to Richmond and supposes it may be filed and preserved in the archives of the State. – He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity except the present & he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any state except in the State of Virginia.

Affirmed and subscribed the day and year aforesaid [signed] Jesse Witt

NOTES:

In May 1779 Gen. Washington assigned Col. Richard Parker to recruit reinforcements for Charleston SC, and Col. William Davies was Parker's temporary replacement.

On 25 March 1843 Alice Witt, 79, applied for a pension stating that she married Jesse Witt (year illegible), and he died 3 Feb 1842. With her application is a copy of a statement signed by Alcy Brown and witnessed by Henry Brown Jr and Samuel Brown that, "I being of age intend marriage to Jesse Witt," dated 6 May 1786. There is also a copy of a bond signed by Jesse Witt and Henry Brown, Jr. dated 6 May 1786 in Bedford County for the marriage of Witt to Alcy Brown. Documents in the file state that Alice Witt died 9 July 1844 leaving the following living children: Lettice Witt, Elizabeth Witt, Daniel Witt, Alice Witt, Milly Witt, and Jesse Witt.

v. Robert Witt, born Abt. 1765 in Bedford Co., VA; died 31 Mar 1849 in Logan Co., KY; married Nancy Reese 19 Apr 1790 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1836 in Logan Co., KY.
6 vi. Rowland Witt, born Abt. 1768 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1838 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Sarah Duvall 31 Jan 1793 in Campbell Co., VA (bond date); married (2) Sophia Wright 14 Sep 1822 in Bedford Co., VA.
vii. John Witt, born Abt. 1769 in Bedford Co., VA; died Abt. 1808 in Logan Co., KY; married Keziah Creasey.
viii. Mills Witt, born Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA; died 15 Feb 1863 in Liberty, Dekalb Co., TN; married Barthena (Bethani) Creasy 27 Apr 1797 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1768.
ix. Elizabeth Witt, born Abt. 1772 in Bedford Co., VA; died Aft. 22 Sep 1806 in Bedford Co., VA; married Francis Calvert 22 Dec 1791 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1751 in Prince William Co., VA; died 11 Jul 1832 in present-day Kanawha Co., WV.

14. Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall, born Abt. 1750 in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges Co., MD; died Bef. Sep 1809 in Muhlenberg Co. , KY. He was the son of 28. Benjamin Duvall and 29. Anne Griffith. He married 15. Elizabeth ? Bef. 1791.
15. Elizabeth ?, born Abt. 1750; died Aft. 1809 in Muhlenberg Co., KY.

Notes for Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall:
The following has been copied and pasted from Richard Bingham's Digital Editions CDROM which is an electronic reprint of Harry Wright Newman's 1952 book, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation."

BENJAMIN SKINNER DUVALL
176... - 18...

Benjamin Skinner Duvall, known generally as Skinner Duvall, was the son of Benjamin and Ann (Griffith) Duvall and was born in Rock Creek Parish, Prince Georges County, Maryland. He accom­panied his parents to southwestern Virginia, where in 1783 he was listed as a tithable in Bedford County.
On September 24, 1783, as Skanner Duvall he purchased from James Stephens for £30 the tract of land on which Stephens was then living containing 30 acres, beginning at a Spanish oak standing on the Black Water River on "Henry County side."1 On November 23, 1784, he bought of William Mead, of Bedford County, for £20 a tract of 216 acres beginning at Ambrose Rain's corner in Peddy's Hollow and on the north side of Black Water Run. Martha Mead, wife of William, waived all dower rights.2
His plantation lay apparently between Bedford and Franklin Counties, as sometimes his deeds of conveyance were recorded in Bedford and at times in Franklin County. While he does not appear on the land-tax lists for Bedford County between 1797-1807, he is regularly taxed in that county for personal property. From 1801 to 1806 there were two male tithables in his household, and while he was not taxed for slaves, his horses consisted of various times between two and four. In 1807 the last year for which he was listed as a tithable in Bedford County it was noted that he was of "the southern district." Lewis Duvall appears as a tithable in 1807, and whereas Skinner had two males in 1806 and only one in 1807, it is assumed that Lewis appearing for the first time was his son and had established his own household.3
On March 4, 1787, of Franklin County, he purchased from Robert Mead, of Bedford County, for £20 a tract of land beginning at Ambrose Rain's chestnut tree and consisting of 216 acres.

His wife was Elizabeth --- who joined him in a deed of February 7, 1791, when he sold to Jacob Criss, of Franklin County, Virginia, for £ 8 a tract of 246 acres lying on the north side of Black-water River beginning at Peday's Hollow and adjoining the land of Ambrose Rain.5
On October 23, 1799, he bought of James Laird, of Iredell County, North Carolina, for £296 land in the latter county, at which time Lewis Duvall and David Beale witnessed the conveyance. On Jan­uary 12, 1802, for $520 he sold the land to Mareen Duvall, of Iredell County. There is no record of his living in Iredell County, and in 1802 at the time of sale he was styled of "Bedford County."
There are no wills nor administrations accounts for him recorded in either Franklin nor Bedford Counties.
__________
SOURCES: 1. Bedford Co. Deeds, Liber 7, folio 333; 2. Bedford Co. Deeds, Liber 7, folio 448; 3. Bedford Co. tax lists, Richmond State Library; 4. Franklin Co. Deeds, Liber 2, folio 46; 5. Franklin Co. Deeds, Liber 2, folio 163.

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http://files.usgwarchives.net/ky/muhlenberg/wills/d6400002.txt

Source: Will Book 1 Page 111 & 112

In the name of God Amen

I Skinner Durall, *(Duvall) of Muhlenberg County, being of sound mind and memory,
do desire this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others
heretofore by me made. and recommending my soul to God who gave it to me and
my body to the dust in comfortable hopes for a joyful resurrection. and as
to my worldly goods which it hath pleased God to bless me with, I give in
the manner following:

My desire for all my debts first to be paid then I give and bequeath to my
beloved wife Elizabeth Durall, *(Duvall) my land and plantation whereon I now live,
and all my household furniture, and all my stock of all kinds during her
natural life, then to be divided betwen my sons, Howard Durall *(Duvall) and
Benjamin Durall, *(Duvall) and **----? Durall, *(Duvall) except five shillings a piece
to all the rest of my children and ten pounds in trade to Manly Moore.

I appoint my beloved wife Elizabeth Durall *(Duvall) and Elisha Durall *(Duvall)
my joint executors to this my last will and testament.
This 17th day of Sept. in the year 1809

Skinner ( X his mark ) Durall *(Duvall) (seal)
Test ;
Micah Wells,
Spencer O'neal,
Robert Elder

Muhlenberg Co. Sct. Oct. Term 1809
The last will and testament of Skinner Durall *(Duvall) dec'd, was produced into
court and proved by the oaths of Spencer O'Neal, and Micah Wells subscribing
witness thereto and ordered to be recorded.

Att. Chas. F. W i n g

NOTE:
* According to Sandra Kidd (a descendant of Skinner DUVALL says that the
surname Durall is mis-spelled and should be DUVALL in this document, she has
several documents of documentation of the spelling...

** Sandra also believes that ----? Durall, is also Elisha Duvall one of the executors...

More About Benjamin "Skinner" Duvall:
Residence 2: 1783, Bedford Co., VA
Residence 3: Bet. 1807 - 1809, Muhlenberg Co. , KY

Children of Benjamin Duvall and Elizabeth ? are:
i. Anna Duvall, married Henry Jenkins 24 Dec 1804 in Bedford Co., VA (bond date).
7 ii. Sarah Duvall, born Abt. 1776 in probably Prince Georges Co., MD, Henry Co., VA, or Franklin Co., VA; died 1822 in Bedford Co., VA; married Rowland Witt 31 Jan 1793 in Campbell Co., VA (bond date).
iii. Keziah Duvall, born Abt. 1781; married David Farley 20 Aug 1801 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1780; died Apr 1860 in Campbell Co., VA.
iv. Jemima Duvall, born Abt. 1785; died 09 Nov 1851 in Clark Co., OH; married Pleasant Howard 23 Aug 1804 in Bedford Co., VA; born 08 Jan 1783; died 21 Sep 1852 in Clark Co., OH.

More About Jemima Duvall:
Burial: Knob Prairie Cemetery, Mad River Township, Clark Co., OH

v. Lewis Duvall, born Abt. 1785; died Bet. 1843 - 1850 in Chariton Co., MO; married Margaret Butler 1804 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1782 in VA; died Aft. 1850.

Notes for Lewis Duvall:
Imported file from Muhlenberg website described Lewis as moving to Keatsonville, KY in 1844 with six younger children. There is no Keatsonville, KY, but Keytesville is the seat of Chariton Co., MO. Daughters Sarah and Nancy were married in Chariton in 1843 and 1845, respectively. Wife Margaret listed as head of household in 1850 Chariton Co. census. Lewis likely died in Chariton Co. between 1840 and 1850.

More About Lewis Duvall:
Died 2: Aft. 1840
Residence 1: Aft. 1804, Settled in Muhlenberg Co., KY
Residence 2: Aft. 1843, Chariton Co., MO

More About Margaret Butler:
Date born 2: TN
Nickname: Peggy

vi. Benjamin J. Duvall, born Abt. 1790 in Virginia; died Aft. 1860 in Muhlenberg Co., KY or Ohio; married Mary Jane Whitaker 13 Jan 1817 in Butler Co., KY; born Abt. 1792 in KY; died 22 Apr 1867.

Notes for Benjamin J. Duvall:
Death date is approximate. There is a death of a Benjamin Duvall recorded in Ohio county KY in 1872 or 1873. This is likely the same person. (From Barry Wayne Duvall)

More About Benjamin J. Duvall:
Date born 2: Abt. 1790, VA
Died 2: Abt. 1872, Ohio Co., KY

More About Mary Jane Whitaker:
Date born 2: Abt. 1792, Kentucky
Died 2: Aft. 1850, Muhlenberg Co., KY
Burial: Arnold Cemetery, Ohio Co., KY
Fact 7: Lived in Butler Co., KY
Nickname: Polly

vii. Howard Duvall, born Abt. 1790 in Virginia; died 14 Apr 1853 in Muhlenberg Co., KY; married Quinney Wells 11 Jun 1811 in Muhlenberg Co., KY; born Abt. 1791 in North Carolina; died 07 Jun 1856 in Muhlenberg Co., KY.

Notes for Howard Duvall:

viii. Archibald Duvall, born Abt. 1798 in Virginia; died Aft. 01 Jul 1870 in Muhlenberg Co., KY?; married Sarah Wells 16 Mar 1826 in Muhlenberg Co., KY; born Abt. 1805 in Tennessee; died Aft. 01 Jul 1870 in Muhlenberg Co., KY?.

Notes for Archibald Duvall:
In the 1860 census, household of Archibald Duvall included Francis M, 14 year old male, and Amanda, 4 year old female. Do not list these as children, because Francis did not appear in household in 1850 census, and Amanda would have been born to a woman 51 years old.

Notes for Sarah Wells:
In the 1860 census, household of Archibald Duvall included Francis M, 14 year old male, and Amanda, 4 year old female. Do not list these as children, because Francis did not appear in household in 1850 census, and Amanda would have been born to a woman 51 years old.

Generation No. 5

16. Thomas Overstreet, born Abt. 1720 in King and Queen Co., VA?; died Abt. 1791 in Bedford Co., VA. He was the son of 32. (probably) John Overstreet and 33. (possibly) Elizabeth ?. He married 17. Agnes Stone? Bef. 1744 in Orange Co. or Caroline Co., VA?.
17. Agnes Stone?, died Aft. 1791 in Bedford Co., VA?. She was the daughter of 34. William Stone and 35. Elizabeth Ann ?.

Notes for Thomas Overstreet:
Descendants of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet suffered a great loss with the passing of James Robert ("Bob") Tinsley at Lynchburg, Virginia on Wednesday, September 26, 2001, following a short battle with cancer at the age of 59.

Bob Tinsley's passion was local history and genealogy, especially that of Bedford County, Virginia. In that county he was especially authoritative on the history and families of the Taylor's Mountain area of northern Bedford. Three families of Overstreets, of undetermined connection to one another, settled in Bedford County in the late 1700's. One family of the name settled around Taylor's Mountain, and although he was not an Overstreet descendant, Mr. Tinsley became especially interested in the genealogy of all three Bedford Overstreet families. He was probably the first person to meticulously research the records concerning the first few generations of the family of Thomas and Agnes Overstreet, the first Overstreets to settle in Bedford, who came there around 1755. They founded the Overstreet clan which became extremely prolific in the Southside of Bedford County, mainly due to the fact that their son Thomas, Jr. had at least fifteen children. Another son of theirs settled in Illinois and another in Tennessee. Mr. Tinsley became interested in furthering his research on the Overstreets not only because persons of the name spread throughout Bedford County and intermarried with other Bedford families, but also because he observed it was the most common surname in the local telephone directory. Although his research originated from an interest in the Taylor's Mountain Overstreets who were of no known kinship to the Thomas Overstreet family of the Southside, Mr. Tinsley in his final years concentrated on the latter lineage.

Mr. Tinsley's remains were cremated and the ashes scattered from the top of Taylor's Mountain. It is requested that memorial contributions be made to Bedford City-County Museum, which will be involved in preserving his research and unpublished manuscripts.

Below is his obituary from the Lynchburg "News and Advance":

James Robert Tinsley

James Robert Tinsley, 59, of Lynchburg, died Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2001. He was the husband of Vickie Adamson Tinsley.

Born in New London, Conn., he was a son of Catherine Hanel Tinsley of Lynchburg and the late Isaac Dabney Tinsley.

Bob was a highly respected for his thorough research into histories of families and the land in Central Virginia, particularly Bedford County. He was often called upon to speak about his work. He fascinated his audiences with his ability to relate for hours at a time with minute details without referring to notes.

He not only was a contributor to the writing in Vol. III of "Bedford Villages, Lost and Found," but his manuscript, "An in Depth Study of Taylor's Mountain" in Bedford County", that is now being readied for publication.

In addition to his wife and mother, he is survived by three sons, James Robert Tinsley Jr. of Amherst, William Phillip Tinsley, Kenneth Allan Tinsley, both of Lynchburg; two brothers, William Tinsley of Hawaii, Phillip Edward Tinsley of Lynchburg; a sister, Patricia Ellis of West Virginia and four grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Monday in the Chapel of Heritage Funeral Service by the Rev. Nigel Alleyne.

In lieu of flowers please make memorial contributions to Bedford County Museum, c/o James Robert Tinsley Fund, 201 E. Main Street, Bedford, VA 24523.

Heritage Funeral Service and Crematory, 427 Graves Mill Road, 239-2405 in charge of arrangements.

To summarize his years of research in which he compiled voluminous notebooks on Overstreet families, Mr. Tinsley delivered several speeches at reunions, museum functions, and genealogical meetings. Two such speeches are cited in the "More About" information herein on Thomas Overstreet, Sr. and Jr. All of us with mutual interests in genealogy and Overstreet descent are especially grateful to Mr. Tinsley for his time and efforts.

The following information on the lives of Thomas Overstreet and his wife Agnes is quoted from a speech given by James Robert ("Bob") Tinsley, a renowned Bedford County family historian, on June 20, 1998, for a reunion of the Thomas Overstreet family at the Terrace Inn Restaurant at Bedford, Virginia:

Thomas Overstreet was the first person of that name to appear in the records of Bedford County. In 1755, just one year after the formation of the county from Lunenburg County, he made a purchase of 400 acres near the headwaters of the southwestern tributary of the Otter River. This creek came to be known as Orrix Creek, and flows in front of a low mountain ridge known as Johnson Mountain. This creek was named for Benjamin Orric, who had obtained land along the creek as one of the first landowners in the area. This portion of the Virginia colony was basically wilderness to these original settlers who started obtaining land grants along the Otter River in the late 1740's. The Native Americans had of course inhabited the area for centuries. While they didn't claim ownership of the land, they did consider the settlers as intruders into their ancestral hunting areas. And as more and more settlers moved into the area, conflicts were inevitable. However, the English king did claim ownership to the land. And, to encourage more settlement, he granted off large tracts of land to wealthy colonists living in the eastern part of the colony. These patent holders then sold off such subdivided tracts to settlers as they came in. Such men as Obadiah Woodson, Archibald Cary, George Walton, and Richard Randolph patented huge tracts in what is now Bedford County. In fact, Richard Randolph patented in 1755, the same year as Thomas Overstreet appeared, 14,000 acres. This grant included some of the headwaters of Falling Creek, another southwestern tributary of the Otter River, and began a few miles to the northwest of the Orrix Creek site. Between these two creeks flowed another creek, called Island Creek. The Overstreets would become involved in the future of all three of these creeks.

Thomas and his family, which already included a wife and several children, settled on the Orrix Creek farm. This farm is now currently located to the south of Route 24 as you come up the hill from crossing Otter River.

Life on a farm in the wilderness was not easy. First the land had to be cleared, crops planted. Thomas had no adult family to aid in this task, and it is assumed he did the bulk of the work himself. There were few neighbors to help, but neighbors of course had similar problems. There was no settlement nearby. The courthouse was at New London, which would be laid out as a village in 1757. This was more than 10 miles away. Few roads even existed. For all intents and purposes, these settlers had to be self-sufficient.

Of course to add to all their challenges, the threat of problems with the Native Americans always existed. Thomas Overstreet was the only Overstreet in the county until after the American Revolution. The county, when cut off from Lunenburg County, covered the area from the middle of the present Appomattox County westward to the middle of present Franklin County. We do not know at this time where Thomas came from. The nearest Overstreets were located in what is now Prince Edward County and Amelia County. They appear in that area from the late 1740's on and are suspected close kin to Thomas. (At this time Mr. Tinsley did not know that Thomas' son, Thomas, Jr., stated in his 1833 Revolutionary War pension application that he was born in 1744 in Orange County, Virginia, so it can now be assumed Thomas Sr. came from Orange County to Bedford County between 1744 and 1755).

Thomas' wife was named Agnes, and they were married shortly before coming to Bedford. They probably had at least two, if not three, of their six children when they arrived. Agnes must have been a strong woman, for she helped her husband build a home and a family in the wilderness and still outlived him past 1793. Things apparently went well for the Overstreets. By 1763 after eight years on the Orrix Creek farm, Thomas was able to look at the expansion of his landholdings. To the north the 14,000 acre land grant of Richard Randolph was being sold off. Randolph had died, and his heirs were selling off parcels through their agent, Richard Stith. Already tracts had been sold to Richard Turner, John Phelps, Richard Ballard, and others. But there was still the bulk of the land on the north fork of Falling Creek, now known as Bold Branch. One year later he purchased an additional 64 and 136 acres adjoining the 346 acres. With the additions of this farm, now totalled 541 acres. What's more, there was still room for expansion. In early 1765 Matthew Talbot and William Mead entered a 900 acre survey for a land grant east of the Randolph, now Overstreet, tract on Falling Creek. At the same time 235 acres of the 900 acres was surveyed for Thomas Overstreet. This tract adjoined the 541 acres on the northeast side across the old Randolph line. It was apparently bought from Mead and Talbot out of what they were getting as a land grant. This addition would expand the Falling Creek farm to 776 acres. Apparently Thomas relocated to this farm about this time, for in 1765 he sold the Orrix Creek farm to John Perry. Apparently when the Mead-Talbot land grant was issued in 1769, there was an error in the amount of land sold or transferred to Thomas Overstreet. To rectify this error a deed was issued to Thomas from Robert Mead for 35 acres, bringing the 200 acres back up to 235.

While waiting for this, Thomas was able to make another land transaction. In 1769 he was able to buy a 350 acre parcel of the Archibald Cary 10,000 acre land grant, which he immediately sold to Adam Lynn. This tract was on Wolf Creek about ten miles west of Falling Creek and probably was never farmed by Thomas. By 1770, all of the Overstreet children were probably born. At least two of the sons were now nearing adulthood. Thomas could now look forward to having grown sons to help him develop the land. To this end he sold the 200 acres obtained from Mead and Talbot to Edwin Franklin in mid-1771. This sale money mayhave been in the works before then because the 35 acres deeded to Thomas a little over two months before the Franklin deed was retained by Thomas as part of the home tract. It didn't go with that. Next in 1772 Thomas bought a 1230 acre tract from Charles Irby. This tract was located on both sides of the east fork of Difficult Creek and had just been granted to Irby the year before in 1771. Later in 1772, Thomas sold off the southwest portion of the Falling Creek farm to James Robertson, perhaps to help cover costs.

There were at least six children in the Overstreet family. Their birthdates for the most part have not been accurately documented. But in approximate order were as follows: Thomas, Jr. born sometime before 1752 (1744 to be exact, as Mr. Tinsley did not know this at the time of his speech); William, born before 1758; Nancy Ann, born in the 1750's; John born 10/10/1758; Mary born in the 1760's; and Elizabeth born in the 1760's. It is suspected that the first to marry was Nancy Ann, who married John Haile. In 1772, as was previously mentioned, Thomas sold approximately 200 acres of the Falling Creek farm to James Robertson. This tract included all the 131 acres on the southwest and on the southwestern part 70 acres of the original 346. This left a residue of 346 acres plus the 64 acre addition plus the 35 acres. This remained as the home tract until Thomas' death.

In 1773 Thomas began splitting up and selling off the Irby tract on Difficult Creek. First he sold off the northeast corner 304 acres to Zachariah Davis. Then he sold a 322 acre parcel to the west of that to John Haile. John had probably already married Thomas' daughter Nancy Ann. In May of 1773 he deeded 222 acres of the Irby tract to his son, Thomas, Jr. This tract was the parcel just west of the parcel he had just sold to his son-in-law John Haile. The balance of the Irby tract was held for another two years, with the tract being either rented or cared for by Thomas Jr., who lived next door. In December, 1773, Thomas entered two surveys for land grants of his own. Apparently the land located on Island Creek which was unclaimed, first survey was for 240 acres, the second survey for 700 acres adjoining the 240 on the south end and running westward across headwaters of Falling Creek. These surveys were probably followed by applications for land grants.

By 1774 the situation with the Native Americans had erupted. With English challenging the French over who would control the lands to the west of the Appalachian Mountains and each side having allies among the native tribes, war broke out. The Bedford Militia was mobilized and sent on the Point Pleasant Campaign. Thomas' son, William, was old enough to participate, and went as a private in Thomas Buford's company.

In 1775 Thomas sold off the last remaining parcel of the Irby tract, to Isiah Turner. This tract was adjacent to Thomas Jr.'s tract and composed of 290 acres. The point at which this tract joined Thomas Jr.'s tract on the south end would become the site of the Lower Goose Creek Quaker Meeting House in 1789 (where you will be tomorrow). Thomas then bought another tract. This 200 acre tract was located on the southside of Goose Creek and was bought from Elijah Turner. Also in 1775 John Haile sold his parcel of the Irby tract to John Burden. Although spelled Burden in the records it is suspected that the correct spelling is Borden. John Borden and his wife, Ann, would live there until 1780 when they sold the tract to Nathaniel Manson. Their daughter, Rebecca, would marry Thomas Overstreet's son, William, about 1780.

In 1776 the American Revolution started. This threw everything into an uproar. Land grant processing stopped, leaving Thomas still waiting for his two surveys. At the same time the militia was mustered again. This time Thomas Jr. and his younger brother, John, answered the call. Thomas, Sr., being too old to serve, provided provisions to the Army as did most of his neighbors. It is not known whether William served again or remained at home to help his father.

In 1777 Zachariah Davis sold 204 of the 304 acres of the Irby tract back to Thomas. This tract Thomas retained until after the end of the war. At the conclusion of the war, the king obviously no longer owned the undeeded land. A new setup had to be instituted to process land claims. In addition to the delay caused by this, the veterans from the war were paid by the state with land warrants. The results of this were a flood of land claims. Old surveys did not necessarily produce the grant that they should have. This may have been the case with Thomas Overstreet.

In 1779 Thomas' son, William, bought 350 acres at the head of Glady Branch. He held this tract for two years and it was sold in 1781 to William Leftwich. About this time William (Overstreet) married Rebecca Borden. In 1785 William bought 100 acres on Arvias Creek on the south side of Goose Creek. In about 1780 Thomas' son, Thomas Jr., returned from the war, having taken a wife, Barsheba. Family tradition says that she was a Native American. No record has been located for the marriage. They lived on the parcel of the Irby tract which Thomas Jr. still owned from before the war. Also in 1780 Thomas' son, John, returned from the war. He was unmarried and apparently installed on the 100 acre tract on the western end of the 700 acre land survey, however on 2/1/1780 Benjamin Witt was issued a land grant for 700 acres. This was the same 700 acres that Thomas Overstreet had surveyed in 1773. How this occurred is unsure. Thomas Overstreet's daughter, Mary, first married a Witt, and then Edward Doss. Did Thomas sell his rights to the 700 acres to his son-in-law as he had sold land to the older daughter's husband, John Haile, allowing the grant to come through in Witt's name? Benjamin Witt died before 1791, leaving only an infant son, John.

A chancery suit developed between Thomas Overstreet and John Witt, resulting in the sale of 100 acres at the western end of the 700 acre tract in 1791 to Ennis Mitchell. The sale was from John Witt, guardian for John Witt, the younger, and only son and heir to John Witt, deceased, to Ennis Mitchell. In 1783 Thomas sold the 200 acres he bought from Elijah Turner in 1775 to Admire Turner. He also sold the 100 acres of the 204 acres he bought back from Zachariah Davis to Joseph Wilson. On 11/3/1785 Thomas' only unmarried son, John, married Nancy Dabney, the daughter of Cornelius Dabney. The Dabneys lived on Body Camp Creek just west of the Irby tract. The following year, 1786, saw Thomas buying yet another tract. This time he bought a 337 acre tract on Glady Branch from William Mead. The tract was actually on a western branch of Glady Branch, almost joining the Irby tract on the southern end. This tract he would keep until his death. In 1787 Thomas sold the final parcel from the Irby tract of 100 acres to Thomas Pullen. This then reduced his land holdings to the home tract, on Falling Creek. The 337 acres on Glady Branch which he had just bought and the 240 acre survey on Island Creek awaited patent. The patent was finally issued on 8/8/1787. By this time Thomas and Agnes were approaching 60. All of their children are married, and there were already grandchildren. His home tract was intact, and he had two tracts available for sale if desired.

There were even other Overstreets in the county. Thomas Overstreet, the hatter by profession, had arrived and purchased 125 acres on Big Otter River in 1783. He and his wife, the former Judith Walker, would remain there until 1793 when they would sell all their land and move to Mercer County, Kentucky. A third Overstreet, James Overstreet, from Goochland County, had just moved into the northern part of the county near Suck Mountain. All three of his (Thomas') sons and their children lived nearby. Everything seemed okay with the first Overstreet family, this however was short-lived. For five years later, around New Year's 1792, Thomas Overstreet, Sr. died. He left a will in which he took care of his wife and family. His two sons, Thomas Jr. and John, were named as executors. Within one year the Falling Creek home tract was sold to John L.W. Mayhew. Another year would see the 240 acre land grant divided and sold. The Glady Creek tract would become the home of Thomas Jr., who had sold the Irby parcel in 1787 possibly to return home or move temporarily to the 240 acre grant and run it for his dad. Agnes outlived her husband, but we do not know how long. With her death the curtain closes on the life of this early settler. But life goes on, as we shall see with Thomas Overstreet, Jr.

This concludes Mr. Tinsley's speech, at least the portion pertaining to Thomas, Sr. Even though he had been working on the Overstreets for several years prior, he was unaware of Thomas Overstreet, Jr.'s Revolutionary War pension claim in which he deposed he was born 15 October 1744 in Orange County, Virginia. Someone brought this record to his attention after his speech, which was found in a recently published booklet on Bedford Revolutionary Pension applications.

Although the ancestry of Thomas Overstreet, Sr. of Bedford County, Virginia, who died in 1791, will probably never be proven, the following information was prepared by noted Bedford historian J. Robert ("Bob") Tinsley (1942?-2001) on February 7, 1999, which is conjecture on the origins of the Overstreet families of Bedford and Southside Virginia:

The following is an attempt to place all of the early Overstreets into perspective. Many of the county records in that region of the state were destroyed during the Civil War. Therefore much of what is developed here is speculative. Therefore the rules of common sense must apply. The picture given here makes sense, based on the bits of available information. As new pieces are unearthed, it is subject to modification. This author hopes at the conclusions that have been made will be ultimately found to be at least close to being historically accurate.

James R. Tinsley
February 7, 1999

The colony in Virginia was founded as a business venture. By 1620 over 1000 individuals had been transported to Virginia to tend the farms and projects of the London Company. These were almost exclusively men and unfortunately most of their names have not been documented. Soon women began to appear and families began to appear.

John Overstreet, the first of that name to appear in Virginia, was most likely one of those early individuals. He first appears in the records in York County in 1654. He lived there until he died in 1671. He married Sarah Moore, the daughter of Geoffrey Moore. She already had one child, Edward Jenkins, by a previous marriage and blessed John Overstreet with three children, namely, Geoffrey, Thomas, and Sarah. All three of the children appear to have lived and died in York County. Thomas died about 1692 leaving "children" which included a son named John. Jeffrey died about 1702 leaving sons John, Henry, Thomas, and Edward. The 1704 Quit Rent list showed that a Jeffrey Overstreet owned land in York County as well as a Thomas Overstreet. A John Overstreet died there in 1710 and a Thomas Overstreet in 1720. It is not known whether any of this line of Overstreets survived with male namesakes. A Henry Overstreet moved to Georgia in the early 1700's. He may have been Jeffrey's son but to this date no evidence has surfaced to imply that.

By 1704 another Overstreet had entered the scene. James Overstreet, after making several trips to the colony during the period of 1682 to 1703, had settled in King and Queen County. References to him appear in the Middlesex County records in the early 1690's. By the 1704 Quit Rent list he appears to have obtained 180 acres and 50 acres in King and Queen County. This county is adjacent to Middlesex County on the west and was split lengthwise in 1702 to form King William County. No evidence has been found to link this James Overstreet to the John Overstreet in York County.

The colony at this time (1704) was composed of two counties on the Eastern Shore peninsula and 22 counties on the western side of the Chesapeake Bay. Settlement, however, had barely reached the fall line of the rivers, about fifty or sixty miles inland. The two Overstreet groups lived about thirty or forty miles apart.

At this point it is assumed that both groups were having children. Ignoring the Henry Overstreet who went to Georgia for the moment, only two sons appear to emerge from this time period. One is a John Overstreet and one is a William Overstreet.

It would appear that John Overstreet lived and owned land in King and Queen County. He died prior to 1743, leaving a wife Elizabeth, who took on boarders through at least 1757. The King and Queen County records were destroyed. However, some of the Vestry records survived, from which the above was obtained. It would seem that he inherited the land of James Overstreet, hence implying James to be his father. If he inherited the land, then any brother he may have had would have been landless.

Thus the other Overstreet would have been landless. William Overstreet went southward to Amelia County, which was cut off of Prince George and Brunswick Counties in 1735. This William died in 1757 where the Inventory and Account of his estate appears in the Prince Edward Will Book I. Prince Edward (the western part of Amelia County) was formed in 1754.

This picture of the two "brothers," one in King and Queen and one in Amelia, is supported by the locations of their children, born in the 1720's and 1730's. John Overstreet had probable sons Gabriel (land in King and Queen County) who went to Kentucky, John (went to North Carolina by 1755--Gabriel got the land), Henry (went with his brother to North Carolina by 1755), and Thomas (married Agnes--went to Bedford County by way of Caroline and Orange Counties). None of these families went to Southside Virginia (i.e., Amelia, Nottoway, Prince Edward, Charlotte, or Halifax County).

On the other hand, William became the father of all the southside Overstreets. His sons were James (Amelia---Hanover---Louisa Counties in Virginia---Kentucky), Thomas (Amelia/Nottoway), Richard (Middlesex County; his son went to Charlotte County), and William (Amelia County). Thomas (the hatter), who migrated to Kentucky, appears to be the son of William Overstreet of Amelia County (William son of William). The Walkers were in this area. He married Judith Walker, then moved to Bedford County, then Halifax County, then to Kentucky. There appears to be no connection between the elder William Overstreet and the York County group. Of course there is also no connection between William and the immigrant James Overstreet. Therefore a choice was made. No William was mentioned in Jeffrey Overstreet's will.

Thus, by the mid 1700's, the Overstreet tree had spread out to Georgia, North Carolina, Southside Virginia, and western Virginia.

Previous to 1745 all the Overstreet references are confined to areas north of the James River, mainly in the Middlesex, King and Queen, and King William County vicinity. This changed in 1745.

A land grant for 393 acres was issued to Anne Overstreet on 6 July 1745 (Grant Book 22, page 269). The tract was located between Namozine Creek, the present line between Amelia and Dinwiddie Counties, and Mawhipponock Creek, the next creek downstream on the James River. It was in Prince George County at that time. Dinwiddie County would be formed from Prince George in 1752, seven years later.

Anne is rarely referenced. She was involved in a debt lawsuit with Buchanan and Hill in Amelia County in 1749 with a capias (?) being issued against her on 20 May 1749 and two debts to the same Buchanan and Hill being dismissed on 16 March 1750/51. At that time the year didn't change until spring so by our date this would be 16 March 1751.

A land grant for 137 acres was issued to William Loftis on 10 March 1756 which bordered the Overstreet tract. This grant was on both sides of Mawhipponock Creek. At this time all reference to Anne or this tract cease. The records for Dinwiddie and Prince George have not survived.

We have no reference to the husband of Anne Overstreet. However, the next references may give a clue.

A number of the Amelia County Tithable lists have survived. In 1749 a James Overstreet appears. He remains on the lists through 1756. In 1752 a William Overstreet appears. He remains on the lists through 1752 and 1753. In 1754 the western end of Amelia County was cut off to form a new county called Prince Edward. In 1757 the estate of William Overstreet (dec'd) was inventoried and appraised (Prince Edward Will Book 1, page 12).

On 31 December 1760 a Thomas Overstreet witnessed the deed by which James Overstreet purchased 100 acres on Lazaretto Creek. This tract, now in Nottoway County, was located then in Amelia County. Lazaretto Creek flows southeasterly parallel to present-day U.S. Route 460 between Burkeville and Nottoway Court House. Five months before, James had purchased 200 acres on Allens Creek in Lunenburg County. This tract was located in the northeast corner of present-day Halifax County. It may have been lost since no record can be found of its being sold. This Thomas Overstreet bought a 100 acre tract in Prince Edward County in 1768, sold it in 1776 (eight years later), and bought a 31 acre tract on Peters Creek in Nottoway County, where he lived until his death in 1797.

Assuming that James and Thomas Overstreet were adults in the 1750's, their births would have occurred in the 1720's or early 1730's.

Adding all of this together produces the following assumed family:

William Overstreet (ca. 1700-ca. 1757) married Anne ? (died after 1756)

1. James Overstreet (before 1720-1817), married three times, eventually moved to Jessamine Co., KY

2. Thomas Overstreet (ca. 1730-1797) married Mary ?; lived in Nottoway Co., VA

These three Overstreets were not the only ones to appear in the Southside counties. In 1782 a land grant was issued for 1064 acres on Cub Creek, in present Charlotte County, to one William Overstreet. On 26 July 1790 the same land was granted to John H. Overstreet, "heir at law" of William Overstreet dec'd. John H. Overstreet first appears in the records on 21 March 1777 when he bought 200 acres in Prince Edward County. He lived in Prince Edward County, except for a three year period from 1789 through 1792, his entire life until his death in 1815. Assuming adulthood when he bought the land in 1777, he would have been born before 1756. Therefore his father William would have been born in the 1730's. This makes William another assumed son of the elder William Overstreet and Anne.

There was another William Overstreet in the area. This William Overstreet bought land in the Louse (?) Creek area of Charlotte County in 1781 and lived there until his death in 1823. In his will he mentioned at least four children. Louse Creek is near to Cub Creek but this William is clearly not the father of John H. Overstreet. Per the early Charlotte County personal property tax lists, he was the only tithable Overstreet in Charlotte County. His birthdate, based on backdating the births of his children, occurred in the early 1750's. It would appear that he was not a child or grandchild of William and Anne. To get a hint of his origins we must return to James Overstreet, the son of William and Anne. Where was he prior to the first appearance in 1749?

In the Christ Church Parish records appears a James Overstreet. This James registered the birth of two children, John on 4 April 1741 and Mary on 23 January 1744. This places James in Middlesex County in the years immediately preceding the land grant to Anne.

Examination of the Middlesex County records reveals a Richard Overstreet who died there in late 1774 leaving a will which names four children: Henry, William, Richard, and Mary. The first child, Henry, had his birth recorded in the Christ Church Parish Record on 20 February 1752. This would make him about the same age as James and in the same place. Richard and his wife Jane probably lived and died in Middlesex County. Richard was probably the father of the William Overstreet of Charlotte County.

Adding all of this to the previous data gives the family shown next. William's birth date fits his being a son of James Overstreet, the immigrant. There is nothing that has been found to link William with the earlier York County Overstreets. James, the immigrant, left records in Middlesex County.

James Overstreet

Grant of 460 acres New Kent County to Lewis Waldin and George Martin 22 September 1682 (Grant Book 7, page 192) for the transportation of ten persons including James Overstreet.

Land grant (29 acres south side of Rappahannock River) issued to John Wood for importation of James Overstreet 22 October 1690 (Grant Book 8, page 116).

James Overstreet and John Stone witnesses Morris vs. Lewis 27 May 1695 (Middlesex Order Book 2, page 46-47) and Jno. Overstreet paid. [This is circ*mstantial evidence that Thomas Overstreet, Sr. of Bedford County, believed to be a grandson of James Overstreet, married a Stone (Agnes Stone?)]

Land grant (700 acres Dragon Swamp in King and Queen) issued to William Jones, Jr. for importation of James Overstreet 6 September 1699 (Grant Book 9, page 209).

Land grant (350 acres on north side of Mattaponi River in King and Queen) issued to William Jones for importation of James Overstreet 23 October 1703 (Grant Book 9, page 557).

John and Elizabeth Overstreet

Land of John Overstreet (dec'd) referenced in processioning order in Vestry meeting (King and Queen) 3 August 1743.

Elizabeth to board (keep) Eliza Brown from 5 October 1753 through October 1754--300 pounds of tobacco levied to pay. Vestry meetings 5 October 1753 and 7 October 1754. Vestry Book of Stratton Major Parish, King and Queen County.

This ends the quoted information from Mr. Tinsley's manuscript. The main point of the manuscript was to state his hypotheses regarding the origins of the Overstreet families who settled Bedford County in the 1700's and whether they were related. The Thomas Overstreet who came with his wife Agnes to Bedford around 1755 and settled in the Southside of the county, may be a grandson of the immigrant James Overstreet of King and Queen County, a son of James' hypothetical son John. Most of the Overstreets on the north side of Bedford County descend from James Overstreet (ca. 1749-ca. 1791) who married Frances Eubank Harrison and came to Bedford before 1780. Mr. Tinsley suggested that this James was also descended from James of King and Queen, perhaps a great-grandson, a son of the James Overstreet who was married three times and a grandson of James the Immigrant's son William. Finally, a third Overstreet, known as "Thomas the Hatter" to distinguish him from the other Thomas in Bedford, came to Bedford County in the 1780's but did not remain there long, eventually settling in Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Overstreet Y-DNA tests seem to corroborate most of Bob Tinsley's hypotheses. According to the latest Overstreet direct-male-lineage DNA tests, the Thomas Overstreet family of Bedford's Southside appears to be related to James Overstreet of the Northside (due to a match between a descendant of Thomas and a descendant of Charles Fayette Overstreet, a son of James and Frances Eubank Overstreet). A descendant of William Overstreet of Goochland/Fluvanna Counties (born about 1750) matches the above. Furthermore, Mitchell and Gabriel Overstreet have been placed in the Bedford group because of matching DNA among their descendants. They were in King and Queen County between 1782 and 1787, but Mitchell later settled in Buckner County, Kentucky. According to a descendant, Gabriel Overstreet rented a pew at the Anglican Church of Stratton-Major Parish in King and Queen County. Apparently he stayed in King and Queen and was descended from James Overstreet, and because the Bedford Overstreets match his descendants, it gives credence to Bob Tinsley's theory that Thomas and James Overstreet of Bedford descend from James of King and Queen. However, the DNA tests performed on the descendants of the James Overstreet (ca. 1736-1817) who was married three times and lived in Culpeper County, Virginia, and later in Jessamine County, Kentucky, do not match those of the Thomas Overstreet family, but their DNA does match that of two descendants of Thomas Overstreet "the hatter." This places James (AKA James with Three Wives) and Thomas the Hatter in a separate group from the King and Queen and Bedford Overstreets. It is hoped that further DNA contributions among male Overstreets will enable researchers to revise or draw more conclusions on whether the various families are related and where they originated.

The following are additional notes on Thomas and Agnes Overstreet, taken from the database of Robert Bruce ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, Washington:

Orange County, VA Pg. 160 Inventory of John McKeney, Decd.
John McKeney. Inventory. 9/23/1751. Total valuation L63.11.5 1/2 including money owed by Thomas Overstreet, John Eubanks, Mordecai Hoard, William Huntsman, Henry Franklyn, Edward Coffee and James Berry. Witness: Honorias Powell, Henry Franklyn, Wm. Hensley
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"Virginia's Colonial Soldiers" by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck. There is a section on Militia Miscelany which mentions a Thomas Overstreet under the command of Lt. Samuel Hairston. No mention of whether it was for service during the French and Indian War or Revolution war. Sharon Fakkema [mailto:[emailprotected]], October 2003, rbo.
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"ABSTRACTS OF BEDFORD COUNTY VIRGINIA, WILLS BK. 1 W/INVENTORY AND ACCOUNTS, 1788-1803" p.126-128
Thomas Overstreet Inventory and appraisem*nt - Dated 29 Feb, 1792
Negros Jenny, Little Jenny, Sale and her child Bacchus, Davie, Jack, Chole and Lucy.
Listed household goods (no beds or chairs listed), livestock (including 18 cattle), no farm equipment, a "New Wagon" and an "Old Wagon". Included "One sommoth gun", onle old stille, and horses names "Hix" (grey), Jack, Darby, Hudnall (grey).
Appraisers; Francis Hopkins, Henry Hayes, James Edgar. returned, 27 Jan. 1794
###
"ABSTRACTS OF BEDFORD COUNTY VIRGINIA, WILLS BK. 2 W/INVENTORY AND ACCOUNTS, 1788-1803" p.80-81
Thomas Overstreet, senior. dated 17 Dec. 1791
Just debts and funeral charges to be paid.
Unto my loving wife Agness Overstreet all my estate real and personal after paying my just debts during her widowhood. If she should marry she shall relinquish two thirds thereof to my children to be disposed of as shall hereafter be directed and the other third part shall be hers during her natural lufe, then to return to my children as the other. I have given my son Thomas Overstreet a tract of land which he hath disposed of now sold him another. He shall pay up the whole of the price to my estate to be divided with the rest and my executors shall make him a deed to the land when he shall make payment according to agreement. To my son John Overstreet that tract of land whereon he now lives containing 200 acres joining lands of Auston, Fauster and Wigginton, exclusive of his equal part hereafter mentioned.
To my six children (viz) Thomas Overstreet, Ann Hail, William Overstreet, Mary Witt, Elizabeth Keath and John Overstreet all the remainder of my estate real and personal to be equally divided between them as followeth; two thirds thereof at the marriage of my widow if she should marry and the other third at her death or at her death if she should not marry at all.
executors; my sons John Overstreet and Thomas Overstreet, Junior...the occation my son William not being mentioned till the fifth item was on account of his having had land given him before...
witnesses; Joel Lewis, John Overstreet, Thomas Overstreet,
Proven; 27 Feb. 1792 by the oath of John Overstreet and the solemn affirmation of Joel Lewis
executor, Thomas Overstreet, (Note; No reference is made here to John Overstreet as an executor)
securities; William Trigg, John Trigg
bond; 2000 pounds
###
---- WILL of Thomas Overstreet, Sr. ----
Posted by: Cathy PORTER-Maynard (ID *****9734) Date: June 09, 2004 at 13:01:56 of 960.
======================================
~ WILL of Thomas Overstreet, Sr. ~
======================================
Know all men by these Presents that I Thomas Overstreet Sener of the County of Bedford and State of Virginia do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament touching such worthy Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with that is today (Viz)
1st Item the first I order and ordain that all my just Debts and funeral charges be paid by my Executors hereafter named.
2nd Item The second I give and bequeath unto my Loving wife Agness Overstreet all my Estate Real and Personal (___) Lands Negroes Chattles good and after paying my just debts during the time of her widowhood. And if she should marry than she shall relinquish two thirds thereof to my children to be Disposed as shall be hereafter Directed and the other third part shall be hers during the term of her natural life and then to return to my children as the other or if she shall not marry to have the whole to the time of her death.
3rd Item the third whereas I have given to my son Thomas Overstreet a tract of land which he hath disposed of I now sold him another My will is that he shall pay up the whole of the price to my Estate to be divided with the Rest and that my Executors shall make him a Deed to the Land where he shall make payment according to agreement.
4th Item the forth I give and bequeath to my son John Overstreet that tract of land whereon he now lives containing two hundred acres more or less joining to lands of Auston, Fauster and Wiggington exclusive of his equal part hereafter mentioned.
5th Item the fifth I give and bequeath to my six children (VIz) Thomas Overstreet, Ann Hail, William Overstreet, Mary Witt, Elizabeth Heath and John Overstreet all the remainder of my Estate Real and Personal to be equally divided between them as followeth two thirds thereof at the marriage of my widow if she should marry and the other third at her Death or all at her Death if she should not marry at all.
6th Item the sixth I do hereby nominate Constitute and appoint and by these have nominated constituted and appointed my sons John Overstreet and Thomas Overstreet Jr. Executors of this my Last Will and Testament and I do further disannul disallow and denounce all former Wills legacies or testaments by me made done or bequeathed Ratifying and confirming This and this only to be my Last Will and Testament__ In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventeenth day of December in the year of our Lord one Thousand seven hundred and ninely one (1791) the occation my son William not being mentioned till in the fifth Item was on account of his having had land given him before.
Thomas Overstreet
Signed and sealed in the presence of us
Joel Lewis,
John Overstreet,
Thomas Overstreet
----------
Will found in Will Book 1, Bedford Co VA
This is from "Six Generations of Overstreets and Their Allied Families," Beginning 18th Century Virginia to 20th Century Middle Tennessee__Clay, Jackson, Knox and Overton Counties, compiled by Pixy Lynn Overstreet Morgan 5724 W. Del Rio Street, Chandler, Arizona 85226 revised 1995. Some families included: Borden, Butler, Dale, Goodpasture, Green, Holman, Nevins, Sevier, Thurman, Waddell, Williams.

More About Thomas Overstreet:
Burial: probably Bedford Co., VA (location unknown)
Comment 1: It has been claimed in one secondary source that he came to America in 1756 with 2 brothers (Scotch-Irish?) but his son Thomas, Jr. was born in Orange Co., VA in 1744 according to his own deposition in 1833 for his Revolutionary pension application.
Comment 2: Because male-line DNA of one of his descendants matches that of descendants of James Overstreet who settled in the northside of Bedford Co., VA, and a descendant of Gabriel Overstreet of King & Queen Co., VA, Thomas probably originated in King and Queen.
Comment 3: His origins and parents have not been proved. But DNA comparisons among Overstreet families indicate he was probably descended from James Overstreet who settled in King and Queen Co., VA, before the 1680s.
Comment 4: 1749, The name Thomas Overstreet is found in Caroline Co., VA and earlier in York Co., VA
Military: Bet. 1757 - 1758, Virginia Militia soldier; Revolutionary War-public service
Occupation: Farmer; may have owned stills according to family tradition
Probate: 1792, Bedford Co., VA
Property 1: 1755, Purchased 400 acres near the headwaters of the southwestern tributary of the Otter River, later known as Orrix Creek for Benjamin Orric who was one of the first landowners there at Johnson Mountain.
Property 2: 1765, Sold the Orrix Creek farm to John Perry. As the 14, 000 acre Richard Randolph land grant was being sold off, Thomas Overstreet purchased 64 and 136 acres adjoining his 346 acre Orrix Creek farm. He then purchased 235 acres nearby on Falling Creek.
Property 3: 1769, Purchased 350 acres of the 10, 000 acre Archibald Cary land grant on Wolf Creek, ten miles west of Falling Creek. Thomas probably never farmed this property because he sold it to Adam Lynn shortly thereafter.
Property 4: 1772, Purchased 1230 acres from Charles Irby on both sides of the east fork of Difficult Creek. a land grant to Irby issued only a year earlier. In 1772 Thomas sold the southwest portion of his Falling Creek tract to James Robertson.
Property 5: Aft. 1773, Began subdividing and selling off portions of his Irby tract on Difficult Creek. Zachariah Davis and John Haile were among the purchasers, the latter having married Thomas' daughter Nancy Ann. 222 acres of this tract Thomas deeded to Thomas, Jr. May 1773.
Property 6: Abt. 1775, Purchased from Elijah Turner a 200 acre tract on the southside of Goose Creek.
Property 7: 1775, Sold the last remaining parcel of his Irby tract to Isiah Turner, 290 acres adjacent to Thomas, Jr.'s land. Where the tracts adjoined was the later site of Lower Goose Creek Meeting House, founded in 1789.
Property 8: 1777, Thomas Overstreet, Sr. repurchased from Zachariah Davis 204 acres of the 304 acre Irby tract, 100 acres of which he sold again to Joseph Wilson in 1783.
Property 9: 1786, Purchased 337 acres on Glady Branch from William Mead close to the Charles Irby tract. The Glady Branch tract and a 240 acre Island Creek tract received patents on 8 Aug 1787.
Property 10: Abt. 1792, Following his death, his Falling Creek home tract was sold to John Love William Mayhew who later settled in Iredell Co., NC.
Residence 1: Bef. 1755, Orange Co., VA
Residence 2: Aft. 1755, Bedford Co., VA; was on jury to value land there in Mar 1755. He was the first of three Overstreets to appear in Bedford County in the mid-1700's. A James Overstreet settled in the northside, and a Thomas Overstreet "the Hatter" also came through Bedford.
Residence 3: Bet. 1755 - 1765, Lived on the Orrix Creek farm after first settling in Bedford County; land was located south of present-day Route 24 near its bridge over the Otter River.
Residence 4: Aft. 1765, After selling his Orrix Creek farm, Thomas apparently moved to a 776 acre farm on Falling Creek.
Will: 07 Dec 1791, Bedford Co., VA

Notes for Agnes Stone?:
Circ*mstantial evidence Agnes was a daughter of William and Elizaberh Ann Stone:

1. Thomas Overstreet, her husband, purchased land on Orrix Creek, Bedford Co., VA from William Stone

2. Agnes had a son William and a daughter Elizabeth Ann

3. Agnes had a great-great-grandson named William Stone Jourdan, MD (1831-1869)

4. Agnes and Thomas' son Thomas had sons named Jeremiah and Stephen, names not see in their immediate Overstreet and Turner sides, and William Stone had sons with those names.

5. William Stone's brother Nicholas also had a daughter named Agnes

6. The Stone, Overstreet, and Turner families appear to have known one another in Caroline County and nearby areas in Tidewater Virginia, and to have come to Bedford County around the same time and intermarried.

More About Agnes Stone?:
Comment 1: Bob Tinsley suggested her maiden name could have been Stone, a possible daughter of William Stone from whom Thomas Overstreet bought land on Orrix Creek. William Stone also apparently lived in Caroline and/or Orange Co., VA. Agnes had a son William.
Comment 2: There is other circ*mstantial evidence that she was a daughter of William Stone. She had a descendant named William Stone Jourdan, MD through her son William who settled in Tennessee. There is no proof that William Stone had a daughter Agnes.

Children of Thomas Overstreet and Agnes Stone? are:
8 i. Thomas Overstreet, Jr., born 15 Oct 1744 in Orange Co., VA; died 11 Apr 1842 in Bedford Co., VA; married (1) Barsheba/Bethsheba Turner Abt. 1775 in probably Bedford Co., VA; married (2) Fanny Roberts 1826.
ii. Nancy Ann Overstreet, born Abt. 1748 in Orange Co., VA?; died in Bedford Co., TN?; married John Haile Abt. 1767 in Bedford Co., VA; born 13 Sep 1743 in Baltimore Co., MD; died Aft. 1810.

Notes for Nancy Ann Overstreet:
The following is quoted from the database of Robert Bruce ("Bob") Overstreet of Everett, Washington:

Below is a paragraph from Roots in Virginia by Nathanial Claiborne HALE, Pg. 11, "Richard HALE of Bedford who died in 1784, had the following children: Sarah, who married Elijah HATCHER; John, who married Nancy OVERSTREET; Elizabeth;James; Martha; Richard; Francis; and Powell. They left numerous descendants later locating in Franklin County on the Blackwater and Piggs Rivers, especially John who married Nancy OVERSTREET. She was a daughter of Thomas OVERSTREET, an early resident and Indian fighter during the depredations of the supposedly friendly Cherokees in 1757. Thomas OVERSTREET died February 26, 1792 and left the following children: John, Mary, William, Elizabeth and Nancy the wife of John HALE. John and Nancy (OVERSTREET) HALE, of this line, thus perpetuated among their HALE descendants in Franklin County the given names of Thomas, John, William and Overstreet, as well as Francis, Richard, James and Powell." Warm Regards, Cindy Hale (date unknown)
###

Well, Bob, we differ in several places, don't we? Especially in the number of children!!! :-)
1. First and foremost, I KNOW from documents through the years that the name is spelled "Haile." That comes all the way down to me....from Nicholas I b. Abt. 1628 to me. I have the name spelled that way in documents all the way down to me. (A few did change to "Hale" in TN...)
2. I have always been told that her name was "Nancy Ann" and you have "Ann Nancy." ???? I have no proof either way. I got this from Denzil Mauldin several years ago. He also gave me the list of children. ?????
3. Denzil also says that John Haile was the son of Nicholas Haile III and Ann Long. There are baptismal records that a John Haile, son of Nicholas Haile and Ann Haile, was born Sept. 13, 1743. There were other John Hailes in a similar time frame, but Denzil Mauldin and others feel that John Haile who was a son of Richard Haile was born later than 1743. This is some of their reasoning....

-TAX LIST: Tax list of 1782 Bedford Co VA states info about Richard Haile and son John, BUT, shows that Richard's son John would have been born ca 1761-1766, which is much later than the John Haile who married Nancy Ann Overstreet.
Bedford Co, VA, 1782 tax list..... "Richard Haile, John Haile his sons, Negroes, Bob, Dafney, Prudy, Rachell, Benn, Randoll and Amy. Personal property & tithes- 5 pounds 2 shillings 3 pence, Free whites over 21- 1, slaves, 7, horses-4, cattle-17, White tithes over 16-2, Blacks over 16- 3.
NOTE: John Haile moved from Bedford Co, VA to Bedford Co, TN as did most of the children of Nicholas III and Ann Long. It appears that William Bannister, second husband of Ann, and Ann Long may have lived Bedford Co, TN along with children and families...Nicholas IV and wife Ruth Acre, Mary Hail and husband Matthew Talbot, Ann Hail and husband William Mead, Meshack Hail and wife Sophia, Abednego Hail and wife Johanna Smith, and John Hail and wife Nancy Ann Overstreet. Mead Haile and wife (Betsey and/or Mary) for sure were in Bedford Co, TN. (I have been told this about the others; I need to research it and verify it!)

-CENSUS: In the 1850 TN Census, I found the following children of Nancy
Ann Overstreet and John Haile:
1. Nancy Haile and John Rees. Nancy, 78, b. VA, John Rees, 80, b. VA, Charles Rives 35, Charlotte 35, Nancy 13, Benjamin 11, Adeline 9, Martha 7, Mary 5, John 3. They were living in Lincoln Co (LI-472-65)
2. Mary (?) and Mead Haile. Miade 76, b. VA, Mary 61, b. NC. They were living in Bedford Co, TN (B-73-166).
3. Elizabeth (Betsey) Haile and Charles Dabney. Charles Dabney 89, b. VA, Elizabeth 73, b. VA. They were living in Campbell Co. (C-203-582).
4. Thomas Hale 63, b. VA, Elizabeth 62, b. VA. They were in Lincoln Co (Li-329-258).
QUESTIONABLE FINDS were Nicholas Haile and Sophia Reese, wife of Meshack Haile.
5. Nicholas Haile. Nicholas Hale 57, b. TN, William 23, Priscilla 22, John 20, Theophilus 16, Mary 14, Marcha 19, Nicholas 1. (Sh-1069-301). There is no wife listed.
6. Sophia Reese, 49 (this would make her 10 when she married if age 49 is correct), b. T, George A. 18, Joseph W. 16, John A. Emerson 16, Rhoda Trevillion 15, Olanda B. Rees 9, Margeret J. Gibson 7, Cahterine J. Reese 5, Eliza Brown 19. They were living in Jefferson Co (Je-678-750).
I could NOT find by surname (including if the wife is a widow) the following children: Frances Haile Thorp or William Thorp, Overstreet Haile or Judith Witt Haile (she remarried John Turner: I did not look for her that way), Jinsey Haile but possibly did find Nicholas Haile. I do NOT know the wife's name of Nathan Haile.

-LAND: Fee Book of 1773, p. 170, Bedford Co, VA; John Haile and wife Ann to Ano. Burdon/Burder (sp??) all land in Bedford, VA, Aug. 20, 1775. Land Jno. purchased from Overstreet.

-BAPTISMAL RECORD: Baptismal Record from St Paul's Episcopal Parish, filmed at the Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore Maryland, Register, Vol. 1, pp1-456 1710-1808: The hand recorded Baptism of John Haile, b. Sept 13 1743, son of Nicholas & Ann Haile. Also recorded in same book is the recorded Baptism of his brother, Abednego Haile, b. 12 Aug 1741, son of Nicholas & Ann Haile, as well as other children of theirs.

We have never been able to find a will for Nicholas Haile III. There is no conclusive proof that the John Haile who married Nancy Ann Overstreet is the son of Nicholas III. It is strongly believed that he is.

4. Mead Haile, b. 1774 did NOT spell "Mead" with an "e." I have several legal documents to back this up. He is my g-g-g grandfather.

If you would like to contact Denzil Mauldin, his address is....
Denzil R. Mauldin, P. O. Box 180, Waverly, TN 37185-0180
I hope some of this helps. When you hear back from Denzil, I would appreciate your sending me a copy. I would like to get a copy of his book. It should be out by now. Sincerely, Pat
Via: Kinsey, Pat, email September 2001, rbo.

iii. William Overstreet, born Abt. 1755 in Orange Co., VA or Bedford Co., VA?; died 24 Jun 1829 in Overton Co., TN; married Rebecca Borden May 1781 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1760 in Botetourt Co., VA?; died Aft. 1827 in Overton Co., TN.

Notes for William Overstreet:
The following is quoted from the database of Robert B. Overstreet of Everett, WA:

Virginia Pension Roll of 1835. Report from the Secretary of War in relation to the Pension Establishment of the United States 1835.

WILLIAM OVERSTREET
UNKNOWN
PAPERS BURNT AT WAR OFFICE
PRIVATE
$36.00 ANNUAL ALLOWANCE
$---- AMOUNT RECEIVED
SEPTEMBER 4, 1789 PENSION STARTED
TRANSFERRED TO PENNSYLVANIA

This is being placed here with no assurance that it is the correct William Overstreet.

October 25, 1774 at Point Pleasant, Virginia (now in West Virginia), the first battle of the Revolutionary War was fought. It is known more popularly as Lord Dunmore's War. William Overstreet is listed as serving in Capt. Thomas Buford's Rifleman's company from Bedford County, Virginia.

Later, William is listed as a resident of Bedford County, Virginia who served one day in military service and was owed 5 British pounds payment. On the same page of the listing of monies owed Patriots for time served, William's brothers-in-law, John Keith and John Haill, are also credited with time served. John Keith for ten days was owed fifty pounds and John Haill was owed thirty pounds for six days served. William Overstreet's brother, Thomas, was credited for nine days service and was owed forty-five pounds. William's wife, Rebecca Borden, is the granddaughter of Benjamin Borden and Zeruiah Winter, who are the Bordens of the Great Borden's Tract of Virginia fame. Her parents were John and Anne Borden.

A deposition (aoldb://mail/write/template.htm#_edn1) concerning the children of John and Anne Borden was taken from Thomas Anderson. Mr. Anderson gave the names of six children for Rebecca Borden Overstreet: William, John, Nancy, Aggy, Rebecca, Rhoda. Mr. Anderson said that Nancy married Robert Neeley, Aggy married Jeremiah Rogers, Rebecca married William Sherrill and Rhoda married John Sevier.

Mr. Anderson reported that John Borden left Augusta County, Virginia after the death of his father and then sold his interest in his father's estate to William Russell in 1753. He believed that John Borden's name was also associated with Orange and Rockingham Counties, Virginia. Anderson also reported that by 24 October 1792, John Borden, his wife and children, along with William Overstreet, were residing in Knox County, Tennessee. Another deposition (aoldb://mail/write/templete.htm#_edn2) was taken on 23 Jan 1841 from William Wheeler who was a son-in-law to John and Ann Borden.

He stated that Rebecca Borden, the third daughter of John and Ann Borden the elder, married William Overstreet, but they were both dead. Rebecca and William had six children. William Overstreet lives in Overton County, Tennessee. He reported that he had been informed that John Overstreet was dead (John died in 1834). Aggy Overstreet married Jeremiah Rogers, but at the time of the deposition were both deceased; they did have children, but Mr. Wheeler didn't know how many boys and girls Aggy had. He reported that Nancy Overstreet married Robert Neeley, who is dead, but she was still living in Overton County, Tennessee. In addition, Rebecca Overstreet married William Sherrell, but they were both dead and had left children. And, finally, Roda Overstreet, the sixth and last child, married John Sevier and they were still living in Overton County, Tennessee, at the time of the deposition.

More About William Overstreet:
Burial: Overstreet family plot, Clay Co., TN
Comment: His son William Overstreet, Jr. (1784-1847) married Polly Preston Sevier whose father, John Sevier, was the first Governor of Tennessee.
Military: 1774, Served in the Bedford Militia in the Point Pleasant Campaign as a private in Thomas Buford's company.
Property 1: 1779, Purchased 350 acres at the headwaters of Glady Branch, Bedford Co., VA, which he sold in 1781 to William Leftwich.
Property 2: 1785, Purchased 100 acres on Arvias Creek on the south side of Goose Creek.
Residence: Aft. 1784, Moved from Bedford Co., VA to Tennessee.

More About Rebecca Borden:
Burial: Overstreet family plot, Clay Co., TN

iv. John Overstreet, born 16 Jan 1760 in Bedford Co., VA; died 08 Jul 1848 in Athens, present-day Menard Co., IL; married Nancy Dabney 03 Nov 1785 in Bedford Co., VA; born Abt. 1756 in Hanover Co., VA; died Oct 1836 in Athens, Sangamon Co., IL.

Notes for John Overstreet:
http://www.genealogytrails.com/ill/menard/fam/hall/ho_6.html

The Grandfathers
Vol.I, The Hall and Overstreet Families
Carrol Carman Hall, Springfield, IL, 1981

The Revolutionary War Period
Section II
Chapter 6, Page 51
The Overstreet line enters the Hall family with the marriage of John Overstreet's daughters to Hezekiah Hall's sons.

"No d----d traitor can march in a parade with me"

John Overstreet 1760 - 1848
Teen-Ager in the Revolution

The time: somewhere in the early 1840's. The place: Athens, Illinois. The event: a Fourth of July Barbeque. The speaker: John Overstreet - an honored patriot who had been in Washington's Army.

The account of the incident reads as follows: "At a barbeque at Athens, Illinois John Overstreet found a Tory in the ranks, and during the parade, dragged him out of line and administered a sound thrashing to him, remarking, " No d----d traitor can march in a parade with me."

If this story is true, John Overstreet was then an old man - by the time's standards - but rugged and full of fight as ever. Chances are good that he did recognize a local resident, who he had known back in Virginia during Revolutionary times. Those were days of passion and memories remained vivid.

Teen-Ager
Our teen-ager of the Revolution was born 16 Jan 1760. This would make him sixteen years of age in 1776. An old account says that he enlisted at the age of 15. Since he had not reached his sixteenth birthdate at the time of enlistment, this is true.

A typical account of his life written by an admiring descendant say: "he enlisted in the Continental Army at the age of 15 years and served his country for a period of six years, having taken part in the Battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth and served under 'Mad' Anthony Wayne at Stony Point. His service ended at Yorktown."

Another record indicates that he participated in the capture of Trenton. There is no doubt that 'he endured the great hardships at Valley Forge!'

John Speaks
On 16 June 1818 John Overstreet appeared before the Court of Common Pleas, Lawrence County, State of Ohio for the purpose of obtaining the benefits of a law of the United States entitled "An Act to provide for certain persons ingaged in the Land and Naval Services of the United States in the Revolutionary War."

On several occasions the writer has used all or portions of this paper in speaking before various SAR groups in Springfield and Decatur, Illinois.

Here is what John declared under oath: "That he entered the service of the United States as a private soldier sometime in September A.D. 1775, for one year service as an enlisted Soldier in Captain William Campbells company, in the first Virginia Regiment then commanded by Col. Lewis and Lt. Col. Christy, and, that he continued until the 22nd day of September A.D. 1776, at which time he was discharged at Williamsburg in Virginia, as will appeare by his discharge herewith presented -

"That on or about the first of January 1777 he again enlisted as a private soldier for the term of three years in Captain George Lamberts Company, Col. William Davis, regiment, fourteenth Virginia regiment and believes then known by the name of the 'first and fourteenth Virginia Regiment,' and that he continued to discharge his duty, faithfully as a private soldier up to the first day of January, 1780, at which time he was honorably discharged at Philadelphia, he being then detached from said Regiment under his other Captain Nathan Reed, his former Captain (George Lambert) having been previously cashiered for unofficerlike conduct - That his discharge was signed by the said Captain Nathan Reed, and Colonel Webb - and the said John Overstreet further saith, that during the time of service he was in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, + the Regiment being then and there commanded by said Col. Lewis and the said Lambert his captain. That he was at the 'storming of the fort at Stony Point under General Wayne, the company being there commanded by said Lambert. The he was also in the battle of Monmouth, where the same Col. Davis commanded the Regiment and the same Lambert commanded the company. That after receiving his discharge (which discharge he has lost) he volunteered to serve at the Siege of York, at which Siege he remained before enemies lines until the Surrender of Cornwallis. And the said John Overstreet further saith that from his age, and reduced circ*mstance he absolutely needs the assistance of his country for his support."

Resume
In looking over John Overstreet's original application it can be seen that he did indeed have a formidable military record. He was not at Trenton as that battle was fought on Christmas Day, 1776. He was at Valley Forge for that terrible winter.

The Continental Line of which Virginia furnished fifteen regiments during the Revolution was the nearest that the colonists had as regular troops. Virginia, alone of the other colonies furnishing Continental soldiers demanded three-year enlistments. They were the main and central body of Washington's army - the most trusted troops, commanded by those officers Washington considered most experienced in the field and were directly under his leadership.

'Almost to be considered Washington's personal troops were the First Regiment of Virginia Continental Infantry, the regiment of Delaware Continental Infa